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I am looking for a way to generate N pieces of question marks joined with comma.

string element="?";
string sep=",";
int n=4;
// code to run and create ?,?,?,?
  • EDIT 1

I am looking in a simple way. Probably using 1-2 line of code. In c++ there are array fill() and joins.

  • EDIT 2

I need this for Compact Framework

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13 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
static class Extensions
{
     public static string Times(this string s, int count)
     {
          StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(count * s.Length);
          for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
          {
              sb.Append(s);
          }
          return sb.ToString();
     }
}

Usage:

Console.WriteLine("?,".Times(5).Trim(','));
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Use the new Enumerable.Repeat method in conjunction with String.Join:

String.Join(sep, Enumerable.Repeat(element, n).ToArray());
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+1, far more readable than the accepted answer –  Mark Elliot Feb 12 '10 at 16:15
    
+1 forgot about repeat. –  Stan R. Feb 12 '10 at 16:18
    
what would be the long path for Enumerable eg : System.Collections. Generic.Enumerable ..... ? I can't find it. I am CompactFramework. –  Pentium10 Feb 12 '10 at 16:20
    
+1 Damn that's elegant. –  Pwninstein Feb 12 '10 at 16:23
    
@Pentium10 - System.Linq.Enumerable.Repeat - not sure if linq is in CF –  David B Feb 12 '10 at 16:23
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var result = Enumerable.Repeat(element, n).DefaultIfEmpty("").Aggregate((s1, s2) => s1 + sep + s2);
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Although this is tricky its way too complicated.. –  Stan R. Feb 12 '10 at 16:15
    
what would be the long path for Enumerable eg : System.Collections. Generic.Enumerable ..... ? I can't find it. I am CompactFramework. –  Pentium10 Feb 12 '10 at 16:18
    
It's System.Linq.Enumerable in System.Core, but I don't know if it's in CF as well. –  Mark Seemann Feb 12 '10 at 16:19
1  
I think all these one liners are way too clever. Having one line do several things at once doesn't make it faster or more efficient. It just makes the code harder to understand. The simple string builder for loop is probably faster and it is certainly eaiser to understand. –  Kevin Gale Feb 12 '10 at 16:20
    
According to the documentation, it's supported on CF 3.5: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb348899.aspx –  Mark Seemann Feb 12 '10 at 16:20
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static string BuildSeparatedString(string element, string sep, int count)
{
  StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

  for (int i = 1; i <= count; i++)
  {
    sb.Append(element);

    if (i != count)
      sb.Append(sep);
  }
  return sb.ToString();
}

It's not fancy but neither is it a cryptic one liner. Anyone reading or maintaining the code should very quickly understand it.

By some quick testing this also runs nearly twice as fast as the two most popular one liners.

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In C# I would do:

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
string element="?";
string sep=",";
int n=4;

for (int x = 0; x < n; x++)
{
    sb.Append(element);
    sb.Append(sep);
}

if (sb.Length > 0)
{
    // remove the final separator
    sb.Length -= sep.Length;
}

Console.WriteLine(sb.ToString());
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What if sep isn't a single character? –  Mark Elliot Feb 12 '10 at 16:14
    
Good point. Updated. –  Michael Todd Feb 12 '10 at 16:36
    
This is the way I have alway done it as well –  Gordon Tucker Feb 12 '10 at 17:41
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StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
  sb.Append((i != n-1) ? "?," : "?");
string result = sb.ToString();
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Not concise but it'll do the trick..

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
sb.Append(element);
for(int i = 1; i < n; i++){
   sb.Append(sep);
   sb.Append(element);
}
string output = sb.toString();
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One line

String s = "".PadLeft(n-1, 'X').Replace("X", element+sep) + element;
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I guess this was downvoted because it fails for n==0? –  finnw Feb 12 '10 at 16:49
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Here is a one liner as well :)

 int n = 10;
 string element = "?";
 string sep = ",";

 string result = String.Join(sep, Enumerable.Range(0, n).Select(x => element).ToArray());
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what would be the long path for Enumerable eg : System.Collections. Generic.Enumerable ..... ? I can't find it. I am CompactFramework. –  Pentium10 Feb 12 '10 at 16:18
    
It turns out it doesn't help me, as I am not on Compact Framework 3.5 Anyway thanks for the effort, I will use other one. –  Pentium10 Feb 12 '10 at 17:00
    
no problem, you have many choices to choose from. –  Stan R. Feb 12 '10 at 17:48
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string result = String.Join(sep,Enumerable.Repeat(element, n).ToArray());
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It turns out it doesn't help me, as I am not on Compact Framework 3.5 Anyway thanks for the effort, I will use other one. –  Pentium10 Feb 12 '10 at 17:01
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Here's another one-line expression to do what you want (with LINQ):

string.join(sep, (from x in Enumerable.Range(1, n) select element).ToArray())
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It turns out it doesn't help me, as I am not on Compact Framework 3.5 Anyway thanks for the effort, I will use other one. –  Pentium10 Feb 12 '10 at 17:02
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string element = "?";
string sep = ",";
int n = 4;

string[] array = new string[n];

for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++) {
    array[i] = element;
}

string result = String.Join(sep, array);
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        string output = "?";
        int n = 4;
        while (n > 1)
        { output += "," + "?"; n--; }
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Doesn't this increase exponentially? You end up with "?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?" i.e. 16 ?'s not the required 4! –  Grhm Feb 12 '10 at 16:14
    
and how is that ? –  Asad Butt Feb 12 '10 at 16:53
    
try it out and you will see –  Pentium10 Feb 12 '10 at 16:57
    
Thanks mate, have made the correction, It was not exponential. The string was repeated! –  Asad Butt Feb 12 '10 at 17:35
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