Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I need to make an assignment where I switch the values of a certain int. For example: 0xaabbccdd should be turned in to 0xddccbbaa.

I've already extraced all of the bytes from the given number and their values are correct.

unsigned int input;

scanf("%i", &input);

unsigned int first_byte = (input >> (8*0)) & 0xff;
unsigned int second_byte = (input >> (8*1)) & 0xff;
unsigned int third_byte = (input >> (8*2)) & 0xff;
unsigned int fourth_byte = (input >> (8*3)) & 0xff;

Now I'm trying to set an empty int variable (aka 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000) to those byte values, but turned around. So how can I say that the first byte of the empty variable is the fourth byte of the given input? I've been trying different combinations of bitwise operations, but I can't seem to wrap my head around it. I'm pretty sure I should be able to do something like:

answer *first byte* | fourth_byte;

I would appreciate any help, becau'se I've been stuck and searching for an answer for a couple of hours now.

share|improve this question
1  
You need to shift the bytes to the correct position in the integer before ORing. – Nick Mar 20 '14 at 11:10
    
But I can OR an entire byte if I'm on the correct position? Because I can't seem to do that correct. I'm not sure how I can OR an entire byte for the empty variable. I only found ways to do it per bit, plus everytime I try to edit the empty variable I end up assigning an int to it, which is ofcourse not what I want. – Bono Mar 20 '14 at 11:13
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Based on your code :

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    unsigned int input = 0xaabbccdd;
    unsigned int first_byte = (input >> (8*0)) & 0xff;
    unsigned int second_byte = (input >> (8*1)) & 0xff;
    unsigned int third_byte = (input >> (8*2)) & 0xff;
    unsigned int fourth_byte = (input >> (8*3)) & 0xff;

    printf(" 1st : %x\n 2nd : %x\n 3rd : %x\n 4th : %x\n", 
        first_byte, 
        second_byte, 
        third_byte, 
        fourth_byte);

    unsigned int combo = first_byte<<8 | second_byte;
    combo = combo << 8 | third_byte;
    combo = combo << 8 | fourth_byte;

    printf(" combo : %x ", combo);

    return 0;
}

It will output 0xddccbbaa

Here's a more elegant function to do this :

unsigned int setByte(unsigned int input, unsigned char byte, unsigned int position)
{
    if(position > sizeof(unsigned int) - 1)
        return input;

    unsigned int orbyte = byte;
    input |= byte<<(position * 8);

    return input;
}

Usage :

unsigned int combo = 0;
    combo = setByte(combo, first_byte, 3);
    combo = setByte(combo, second_byte, 2);
    combo = setByte(combo, third_byte, 1);
    combo = setByte(combo, fourth_byte, 0);

    printf(" combo : %x ", combo);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! That actually makes a lot of sense, and it did the trick. Didn't you know you could do it that way. – Bono Mar 20 '14 at 11:18

unsigned int result;

result = ((first_byte <<(8*3)) | (second_byte <<(8*2)) | (third_byte <<(8*1)) | (fourth_byte))

share|improve this answer

You can extract the bytes and put them back in order as you're trying, that's a perfectly valid approach. But here are some other possibilities:

bswap, if you have access to it. It's an x86 instruction that does exactly this. It doesn't get any simpler. Similar instructions may exist on other platforms. Probably not good for a C assignment though.

Or, swapping adjacent "fields". If you have AABBCCDD and first swap adjacent 8-bit groups (get BBAADDCC), and then swap adjacent 16-bit groups, you get DDCCBBAA as desired. This can be implemented, for example: (not tested)

x = ((x & 0x00FF00FF) <<  8) | ((x >>  8) & 0x00FF00FF);
x = ((x & 0x0000FFFF) << 16) | ((x >> 16) & 0x0000FFFF);

Or, a closely related method but with rotates. In AABBCCDD, AA and CC are both rotated to the left by 8 positions, and BB and DD are both rotated right by 8 positions. So you get:

x = rol(x & 0xFF00FF00, 8) | ror(x & 0x00FF00FF, 8);

This requires rotates however, which most high level languages don't provide, and emulating them with two shifts and an OR negates their advantage.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, swapping the adjacent fields was another approach I was thinking about as well. But for extra clarity I used the "extract" method. These are good suggestions though, I'll definitely keep them in mind! – Bono Mar 20 '14 at 12:04
#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    unsigned int input = 0xaabbccdd,
                 byte[4] = {0},
                 n = 0,
                 output = 0;
    do
    {
        byte[n] = (input >> (8*n)) & 0xff;
        n = n + 1;
    }while(n < 4);

    n = 0;
    do
    {
        printf(" %d : %x\n", byte[n]);
        n = n + 1;
    }while (n < 4);

    n = 0;
    do
    {
        output = output << 8 | byte[n];
        n = n + 1;
    }while (n < 4);

    printf(" output : %x ", output );

    return 0;
}

You should try to avoid repeating code.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yeah I know. Just writing it down in such a way that I can understand it easily. And when I fully comprehend what everything is I go and refactor it. Cheers – Bono Mar 20 '14 at 11:25
    
Don t worry, I do that a lot too. Cheers. – DrakaSAN Mar 20 '14 at 11:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.