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Is there some Haskell extension that enables the creation of more complex data constructors then GADT?

Suppose I wanted to create a data structure that is an ordered list, and have a data constructor similar to (:) that work with lists, with type signature:

data MyOrdList a where
    (>>>) :: (Ord a) -> a -> MyOrdList a -> MyOrdList a

But I want (>>>) to have a specific behavior, something like this:

(>>>) :: (Ord a) => a -> [a] -> [a]
x >>> [] = [x] 
x >>> xs = low ++ [x] ++ high 
  where low  = filter (<x) xs
      high = filter (>x) xs

So the structure will be always an ordered structure. (I don't now if this is a good practice, I'm just offering the simplest example that occurred me of the type of behavior I want).

Of course I can use a function (>>>), but then I'll have no pattern matching and other benefits I'd have it >>> was a data constructor.

Is there any way to do something like this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could make :>>> a data constructor, but you'd have to hide it to preserve your invariant. Notice that you can pattern-match against it as in render:

module MyOrdList (mkMyOrdList,MyOrdList,render) where

import Data.List

import qualified Data.ByteString as BS

data MyOrdList a
  = EmptyDataList
  | (:>>>) a (MyOrdList a)
  deriving (Show)

mkMyOrdList [] = EmptyDataList
mkMyOrdList xs = y :>>> mkMyOrdList ys
  where y = minimum xs
        ys = delete y xs 

render :: (Show a) => MyOrdList a -> String
render EmptyDataList = "<empty>"
render (x :>>> xs) = (show x) ++ " -> " ++ render xs

Then you might use the MyOrdList module as in

module Main where

import Control.Applicative
import System.IO

import qualified Data.ByteString as BS

import MyOrdList

main = do
  h <- openBinaryFile "/dev/urandom" ReadMode 
  cs <- readBytes 10 h
  -- but you cannot write...
  -- let bad = 3 :>>> 2 :>>> 1 :>>> EmptyOrdList
  putStrLn (render $ mkMyOrdList cs)
  where
    readBytes 0 _ = return []
    readBytes n h = do c <- BS.head <$> BS.hGet h 1 
                       cs <- readBytes (n-1) h
                       return (c:cs)

Sample output:

54 -> 57 -> 64 -> 98 -> 131 -> 146 -> 147 -> 148 -> 190 -> 250 -> <empty>
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You could make MyOrdList an abstract type and (>>>) a function and use view patterns. For simplicity, I use a standard list as a "backend" here.

module MyOrdList
  (MyOrdList,
   MyOrdListView (OrdNil, OrdCons),
   (>>>),
   emptyOrdList,
   ordview
  ) where

import Data.List (sort)

newtype MyOrdList a = List [a]
  deriving Show

data MyOrdListView a = OrdNil | OrdCons a (MyOrdList a)

infixr 5 >>>

(>>>) :: (Ord a) => a -> MyOrdList a -> MyOrdList a
x >>> (List xs) = List (sort $ x:xs)

emptyOrdList = List []

ordview :: MyOrdList a -> MyOrdListView a
ordview (List []) = OrdNil
ordview (List (x:xs)) = OrdCons x (List xs)

You can use it like that:

{-# LANGUAGE ViewPatterns #-}

import MyOrdList

ordlength :: MyOrdList a -> Int
ordlength (ordview -> OrdNil) = 0
ordlength (ordview -> OrdCons x xs) = 1 + ordlength xs

Works:

*Main> ordlength $ 2 >>> 3 >>> 1 >>> emptyOrdList 
3
*Main> 2 >>> 3 >>> 1 >>> emptyOrdList 
List [1,2,3]

So your type is abstract, lists can only be constructed by emptyOrdList and (>>>) but you still have some pattern matching convenience.

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