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I'm using Spring 3 and Maven. I've defined all spring modules in my pom.xml.

When I use <aop:scoped-proxy />, I get an error saying that CGLIB is missing.

Well... I add CGLIB as a dependency in my pom and it all runs...

I'm a little confused... Maven is a dependency manager... Why it does not download CGLIB when I use the spring-aop module?

It's not the only case... Why do some projects need explicit dependency declaration instead of using Maven transitive dependency mechanism?

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@Jerome C. Well you can't expect maven to find everything on its own, its not a magic thing, because sometimes some dependencies don't exist on repository, sometimes you need to download them manually. However it should have downloaded on its own that dependency but it didn't, and Maven is far from perfect but it is the closest of all other build tools(although maven is not just a build tool). –  ant Feb 12 '10 at 16:29
    
@Pascal Thivent hmm I think you miss-understood my comment or I wrote it in uncomprehending fashion because : 1. Maven will find a dependency if it is available in a repository and if the pom contains the required information - ".., because sometimes some dependencies don't exist on repository" 2. But in the case of spring and cglib, cglib is an optional dependency so you won't get it unless you specify it explicitly - "Well you can't expect maven to find everything on its own, its not a magic thing" -> as you said because it is an optional dependency it wont find it. Where I was being wrong –  ant Feb 12 '10 at 22:21
    
@Pascal Thivent Anyways I've just started with maven couple of weeks ago its very good tool/platform, but everyone knows you're far experienced user and they should use common sense and conclude that your post/comments are likely to be more correct than mine.I personally like reading your posts/comments about Maven cause they are always useful so don't get this the wrong way. Cheers –  ant Feb 12 '10 at 22:22
    
@c0mrade Maybe I misunderstood your comment. In that case, I apologize. And I'll remove mine –  Pascal Thivent Feb 13 '10 at 15:08
    
@Pascal Thivent no worries m8, leave your comment as it is it might be helpful to someone. –  ant Feb 13 '10 at 16:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 45 down vote accepted

It's because cglib is marked as an optional dependency.

Essentially you don't need cglib for every usage of the spring-aop library, so maven doesn't download it automatically. You need to specify it manually, unfortunately.

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+1 for your answer –  ant Feb 12 '10 at 16:32
    
exact, I just discover the optional feature ;) But when a dependency is declared as optional, it's just for doc ? or there is a way to activate it in the module declaration ? –  Jerome Cance Feb 12 '10 at 16:39
1  
@Jerome as I understand it the dependency is downloaded when they build spring-aop, but not when you build a project which depends on spring-aop. If that makes sense! –  Phill Sacre Feb 12 '10 at 16:57

I'm a little confused... Maven is a dependency manager... Why it does not download the cglib when I use the spring-aop module ?

Because not everybody uses CGLIB (an AOP proxy in Spring can be a JDK dynamic proxy or a CGLIB proxy) so CGLIB is marked as an optional dependency in the pom of spring-aop and you have to add it explicitly if you want to use it. This is exactly what optional dependencies are for.

Another similar example is Hibernate that lets you choose between cglib and javassist in hibernate-core in the same way. Hibernate also lets you choose between various connection pools (if you decide to use one of them) or cache providers (only ehcache, the default, is not declared as optional).

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My guess would be that cglib is not enabled in Spring by default. And therefore it's not included in the pom unless you explicitly enable it.

As far as I know, Maven cannot go into your Spring configuration files and determine if it needs additional optionally enabled libraries. Although, that certainly sounds like it would be a cool Spring-Maven plugin if it were possible to modify the pom on the fly via plugin. Not sure if it is, but it would be cool.

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