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I'm working on a encryptor application that works based on RSA Asymmetric Algorithm. It generates a key-pair and the user have to keep it. As key-pairs are long random strings, I want to create a function that let me compress generated long random strings (key-pairs) based on a pattern.

(For example the function get a string that contains 100 characters and return a string that contains 30 characters)

So when the user enter the compressed string I can regenerate the key-pairs based on the pattern I compressed with.

But a person told me that it is impossible to compress random things because they are Random!

What is your idea ? Is there any way to do this ?

Thanks

share|improve this question
5  
That person was right. You should read up on information theory and entropy. – Kretab Chabawenizc Mar 20 '14 at 14:46
    
Well, if it's random then you've got a random chance of being able to compress it! – Sean Mar 20 '14 at 14:46
1  
The easiest answer is to try and compress them, and see what you get and see if it is good enough. One word of caution, compression algorithms usually produce binary output and not strings. You can convert binary to string using BASE64 encoding, but that incurs inflation penalty of 25% (IIRC). Still you may wind up with shorter string - depends on its contents. – LB2 Mar 20 '14 at 14:47
    
I'm not an expert on cryptography, but what you are trying to do will make the compression go from keys with 100 characters to keys with 30 characters. And if you are relying on attacker not knowing your "function" then that will never work : en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Security_through_obscurity – Euphoric Mar 20 '14 at 14:49
1  
Some data is compressible, other is not. You cannot expect a certain level of compression every time. – Kami Mar 20 '14 at 14:49
up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's impossible to compress (nearly any) random data. Learning a bit about information theory, entropy, how compression works, and the pigeonhole principle will make this abundantly clear.

One exception to this rule is if by "random string", you mean, "random data represented in a compressible form, like hexadecimal". In this sort of scenario, you could compress the string or (the better option) simply encode the bytes as base 64 instead to make it shorter. E.g.

// base 16, 50 random bytes (length 100)
be01a140ac0e6f560b1f0e4a9e5ab00ef73397a1fe25c7ea0026b47c213c863f88256a0c2b545463116276583401598a0c36
// base 64, same 50 random bytes (length 68)
vgGhQKwOb1YLHw5KnlqwDvczl6H+JcfqACa0fCE8hj+IJWoMK1RUYxFidlg0AVmKDDY=

You might instead give the user a shorter hash or fingerprint of the value (e.g. the last x bytes). Then by storing the full key and hash somewhere, you could give them the key when they give you the hash. You'd have to have this hash be long enough that security is not compromised. Depending on your application, this might defeat the purpose because the hash would have to be as long as the key, or it might not be a problem.

share|improve this answer
    
This indeed seems to be the better and also safer way of working, might even associate them with GUID's instead of a hash of the key. – woutervs Mar 20 '14 at 15:05
    
@woutervs potentially, yes, but a GUID is not a secure thing. It's mostly pseudorandom now, but not cryptographically secure. A secure pseudorandom number generated of the appropriate length would work as well. – Tim S. Mar 20 '14 at 15:17
    
Yes but I was purely targeting, the store it somewhere thing, In that case I think a GUID might be better for referencing the actual key. As far as I know that has nothing to do with security. Offcourse the transport of the key from and to the client should be secured. (For example through WCF using transport/message security). – woutervs Mar 20 '14 at 15:27
public static string ZipStr(String str)
{
    using (MemoryStream output = new MemoryStream())
    {
        using (DeflateStream gzip = 
          new DeflateStream(output, CompressionMode.Compress))
        {
            using (StreamWriter writer = 
              new StreamWriter(gzip, System.Text.Encoding.UTF8))
            {
                writer.Write(str);           
            }
        }

        return Convert.ToBase64String(output.ToArray());
    }
}

public static string UnZipStr(string base64)
{
    byte[] input = Convert.FromBase64String(base64);

    using (MemoryStream inputStream = new MemoryStream(input))
    {
        using (DeflateStream gzip = 
          new DeflateStream(inputStream, CompressionMode.Decompress))
        {
            using (StreamReader reader = 
              new StreamReader(gzip, System.Text.Encoding.UTF8))
            {
                return reader.ReadToEnd();
            }
        }
    }
}

Take into account that this doesn't have to be shorter at all... depends on the contents of the string.

share|improve this answer

Try to use gzip compression and see if it helps you

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