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ok im new at javascript, but im trying to change the innerhtml of a div tag, heres my script and its not working:

<head>
<script type="text/javascript">
function var1() {
document.getElementById('test').innerHTML = 'hi';
}
window.onLoad = var1();
</script>
</head>
<body>
<div id="test">change</div>
</body>

it should work but for some reason its not, any help?

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The phrase "not working" covers an awful lot of scenarios. What exactly is the error? –  Jonathon Faust Feb 12 '10 at 20:22
    
theres no error, its just not changing the text inside the 'test' div. i just tried and if i put the javascript under the div, it works. is there a way to make it work when above the div as i have shown? –  change Feb 12 '10 at 20:23

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Rather than assigning var1 to window.onload, you're currently calling the function and storing its result. Also, this might be obvious, but var1 seems like an odd name for a function. Try this:

function var1() {
  document.getElementById('text').innerHTML = 'hi';
}

window.onload = var1;

Note the casing of onload, as well as the missing parentheses after var1.

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1  
you should not use innerHTML it is non-standard and a bad practice. It’s a lot safer to use DOM methods like createElement, createTextNode and appendChild. –  Jarrod Roberson May 5 '10 at 15:44

correct:

window.onload = var1;

in your example value of window.onload is undefined because function var1 returns nothing (undefined). You should set onload property to function var1, not result of calling function var1()

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still doesnt work.. –  change Feb 12 '10 at 20:19
1  
@David: Notice also the change from onLoad to onload. I tried it and it works just fine. –  Guffa Feb 12 '10 at 20:25

using .innerHTML is considered bad practice, it is non-standard, you should create a new element and add it to the tree instead

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2  
No. Using innerHTML is the fastest way. –  Josh Stodola Feb 12 '10 at 20:32
1  
doesn't mean is isn't bad practice –  Jarrod Roberson Feb 12 '10 at 20:34
2  
It's non standard, therefore it can lead to undefined behaviour, ie: security flaws, thus is bad practice. I can't believe someone voted this down... –  L̲̳o̲̳̳n̲̳̳g̲̳̳p̲̳o̲̳̳k̲̳̳e̲̳̳ May 5 '10 at 0:26

You're getting an element with an id of "test", but there is no element with that id in your html. There is, however, one called "text".

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oh sorry, i fixed that i didnt copy and paste from my text just typed it in here, my bad. but yeh still doesnt work –  change Feb 12 '10 at 20:16

Your example will work if you change the uppercase "L" to a lowercase "L" in "onLoad" and remove the parenthesis after var1 where you currently have window.onLoad = var1();

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Try changing onLoad to onload.

function var1() {
  document.getElementById('test').innerHTML = 'hi';
}
window.onload = var1; // onload
share|improve this answer
    
It’s a lot safer to use DOM methods like createElement, createTextNode and appendChild. –  Jarrod Roberson May 5 '10 at 15:44
    
You can check that this will not solve the problem. You execute the function before the onload, which is unintended. –  brunoais Oct 29 '12 at 22:23
    
@brunoais updated. the issue I was trying to draw attention to there was the camelCase on onload. –  johnmdonahue Nov 13 '12 at 23:54

I would normally call a function I wanted to fire when a page loads by attaching an event to the body tag ... <body onload="var1();"> ... also innerHTML is read/write so keep in mind it will write over anything inside the corresponding DIV. if you wanted to keep existing content inside a DIV tag and add new HTML/Content you would have to employ the createElement()/appendChild() DOM scripting methods

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