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I have looked at a number of questions that are very similar but I still can't manage to fix this.

Consider the simple class:

class Obj
{
public:
    Obj(int moose);
    ~Obj();

private:
    int* val;
};


Obj::Obj(int num)
{
    val = new int;

    *val = num;
}


Obj::~Obj()
{
    printf("Cleanup");
    delete val;
}

Now I want to have a vector of pointers to objs. The source details the problem:

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    std::vector<Obj*> objs;

    Obj* o = new Obj(10);

    objs.push_back(o);

    objs.erase(objs.begin() + 0);

    // should have been deleted by now - I want the destructor to have been called
    // I have tried delete objs[0], casting to it and then deleting it.

    return 0;
}

The destructor in Obj is only called when the program has finished. I want it to be called when the object is erased from the vector.

Clarification: I am trying to delete the object using the reference from the vector. I cannot get it to do so. I know that the vector doesn't deallocate the memory. It just removes the reference from the vector. Can anyone provide code which would delete the object and call the destructor using a reference from the vector.

Edit:

Even after adding:

auto it = objs.begin() + 0;
delete *it;
objs.erase(it);

as suggested, the destructor of the Obj does not fire.

share|improve this question
1  
Then you'll have to use delete on it before erasing it, or use something like a container of smart pointers or Boost's ptr_vector. –  chris Mar 21 '14 at 1:27
2  
std::vector<> doesn't destruct its elements, it simply removes them from the container. It's up to you to delete the memory. –  0x499602D2 Mar 21 '14 at 1:27
    
You want to use shared_ptr or ptr_vector stackoverflow.com/questions/10790161/shared-ptr-with-vector –  Daniel Mar 21 '14 at 1:28
    
Why are you having a pointer to an integer in your class? I hope you don't have that in your real code. –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 21 '14 at 1:28
1  
@JoachimPileborg Just for a simple allocation example. –  user923 Mar 21 '14 at 1:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As a number of comments have pointed out, vector.erase only removes the elements from the vector. It does NOT try to delete any associated memory.
To delete the associated memory explicitly, you need to:

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    ...

    auto it = objs.begin() + i;
    delete *it;
    objs.erase(it);

}

Actually, in your case:

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    std::vector<Obj*> objs;

    Obj* o = new Obj(10);
    objs.push_back(o);    

    auto it = objs.begin();
    delete *it;
    objs.erase(it);

}

There are a number of other inconsistencies with your code and, better solutions for what you're trying to do, such as:

  • Using a vector<Obj>:

    int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
    {
        std::vector<Obj> objs;
        objs.emplace_back(10);    
    
        auto it = objs.begin();
        objs.erase(it);
    }
    
  • If you need to dynamically allocate your objects, but for some reason do not want the vector to handle that, you can use shared_ptr or unique_ptr, who will take care of the deallocation for you:

    int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
    {
        std::vector<std::unique_ptr<Obj>> objs;
    
        objs.emplace_back(new Obj(10));    
    
        auto it = objs.begin();
        objs.erase(it);
    }
    
share|improve this answer
    
Oh good point, my bad, will edit –  Martin J. Mar 21 '14 at 1:37
    
Using your examples, I am still not getting the destructor of my Obj class to fire. That's the problem I have been having. –  user923 Mar 21 '14 at 1:42
    
I have actually tested the three versions of the code I posted, and they all seem to properly destroy the object. One version briefly had a delete[] operator because I had misread your code, so maybe that's the version you're trying to use ? –  Martin J. Mar 21 '14 at 1:51
    
Weird. Must be something with my code then. It really is just the code I posted above. Also, I realize it looks weird declaring memory on the heap and then using a vector of pointers but in my actual program, it's not used in this way. –  user923 Mar 21 '14 at 1:55
1  
Try it with just this code, and see if that works for you... if it does, that narrows down the problem to something else. Possibly the use of a derived class with a non-virtual destructor ? –  Martin J. Mar 21 '14 at 1:59

When you erase an element (which is a pointer) from a vector, you are just removing it from the container vector. But the location that the pointer was pointing to is still valid memory on heap. If you want to free that memory, you should use delete, and explicitly free the memory. If you do not want to manage the memory on your own, use smart pointers.

share|improve this answer
    
I still cannot get the destructor to fire when deleting the object. –  user923 Mar 21 '14 at 1:45
    
Something similar to delete objs[0] will call the destructor. You should erase the object from the vector if you don't need it, but you should also call delete o or delete objs[0]. –  user1717884 Mar 21 '14 at 1:59
    
How are you deleting the object and checking if the destructor was called before the program ended? –  user1717884 Mar 21 '14 at 2:06

When you erase an item from a vector, the destructor of the item will be called. But in this case the item is a pointer, and pointers don't have destructors. The object the pointer is pointing to will not have its destructor called until you use delete on the pointer. If the pointer is erased and you don't have another copy of it, you'll never be able to delete it and you'll have a memory leak.

Whenever possible, prefer to put the object itself in the vector rather than a pointer. That will relieve you of the chore of memory management.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. The particular problem I am having here though is that when I delete the object, the destructor doesn't fire until the program has ended. –  user923 Mar 21 '14 at 1:44
    
@user923 you delete val, but to make that happen you have to delete o first. I don't see that in the code you posted. –  Mark Ransom Mar 21 '14 at 1:47
    
auto it = objs.begin() + 0; delete *it; objs.erase(it); –  user923 Mar 21 '14 at 1:52
    
Still does not call the destructor. –  user923 Mar 21 '14 at 1:54
    
@user923 it does for me: ideone.com/JP0mIE –  Mark Ransom Mar 21 '14 at 1:56

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