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I'm new with ThreadStatic, and I used ConcurrentDictionary before. So which is the better choice? Or it's depended to scenario. If it's depended:

  1. What scenario should I use [ThreadStatic] marked with a IList property?
  2. What scenario should I use *ConcurrentDictionary *?
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It depends on what you're using them for. On the face of it, the two things share nothing in common. It's like asking whether you should eat an orange or ride a bicycle. Tell us what you want to do, and we can help you decide how to do it. –  Jim Mischel Mar 21 '14 at 20:57
    
@JimMischel: oh thanks, I didn't recognize it. What I want is multi-thread share same resource (e.g. a List of objects), and it should be thead-safe. –  Vu Nguyen Mar 24 '14 at 1:26

1 Answer 1

ThreadStatic can only be used in current thread and it is not possible to access instance from other thread. Each thread will have its own instance of ThreadStatic.

ThreadStatic is stored in Thread Local Storage, each Thread has local storage, .NET does some extra logic to make this work.

  1. When you want to access one instance per thread, then you should use ThreadStatic. In case of client server communication, server has one thread per socket, and it needs to store information about client socket and some other information in static variable accessed by some other library. ThreadStatic leads to complicated code so it should be avoided or coded carefully.

  2. When you want to access a shared resource among multiple threads then you can use ConcurrentDictionary.

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ThreadStatic - "When you want to access one instance per thread". If there is one instance per thread, why do I need to use ThreadStatic? Actually, as usual, I don't use ThreadStatic if I need one instance only. –  Vu Nguyen Mar 21 '14 at 6:40

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