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I came across this C program in a blog post:

main()
{
    int n;
    n = 151;
    f(n);
}

f(x)
int x;
{
    printf("%d.\n", x);
}

The post doesn't explain it. Can anybody explain what this weird function definition means?

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2  
Please don't change the code/question once you ask. This might be misleading to people who have a look at the answer and find it unrelated. – vishram0709 Mar 21 '14 at 7:03
    
@ruakh, You have changed my entire code. There was an another code before the code you've have included in my question. So I've to edit this one more. – Scotia 웃 Mar 21 '14 at 7:08
    
What part of this code don't you understand? Please be specific what you need explained. – Raymond Chen Mar 21 '14 at 7:14
    
@vishram0709, Scotia: Mea culpa. – ruakh Mar 21 '14 at 14:48
up vote 10 down vote accepted

This is the K&R style of C code, it's still valid C syntax, but I suggest you not using it in new-written code.

f(x)
int x;

is equivalent to ANSI C:

void f(int x)

K&R C is the C language described in the first edition of the book C programming language by Brian Kernighan and Dennis Ritchie, and named after the two authors. The second edition of the book updated to use ANSI C.

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2  
It's still valid, even in C11 so, while you are correct in suggesting it shouldn't be used, saying "don't use it" could be considered a little too strong. Especially since glibc uses it :-) – paxdiablo Jun 27 '14 at 5:13
f(x)
int x;
{
    printf("%d.\n", x);
}

is an older way of defining function. Now it can be read as

void f(int x)
{
    printf("%d.\n", x);
}
share|improve this answer

This code is simply bad.

  1. Obsolete declaration of function f()
  2. There should be forward declaration of f() before main()
  3. Return type is missing for f()
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1  
Also, the compiler may make f() default to int as return type, which in turn will lead to the compiler complaining for non returned value. – Asblarf Mar 21 '14 at 7:03
    
Thx, @Asblarf - updated the answer according to your comment – Robert Mutke Mar 21 '14 at 7:05

please change your c learning source!

that is a very old style of C (K&R C).

f(x)

int x;
{}

is equivalent to

void f(int x)
{}

you should really not wasting time learning that.

look for sources that teach ANSI C C89/C90 and also note the new features of C99 (that isn't widely adopted by many compilers, so know the differences)

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Hey, C89/C90??? - it's over 20 years old. Check out the latest C11! – Robert Mutke Mar 21 '14 at 7:03
    
@RobertMutke have you ever worked on some serios industrial products? the most compiler for the embedded systems that are certified does not actually support c99. – vlad_tepesch Mar 21 '14 at 7:05
    
Let me disagree with you. gcc, keil, iar fully support c99 – Robert Mutke Mar 21 '14 at 7:07
    
@RobertMutke gcc does not fully support c99! and you seldem will use gcc in safety relevant products. also i haven't sad that c99 should be ignored. i just sad 'know the basics' and know the differences. – vlad_tepesch Mar 21 '14 at 7:09
    
@RobertMutke also look at this thread: stackoverflow.com/questions/139479/… and this link gcc.gnu.org/c99status.html – vlad_tepesch Mar 21 '14 at 7:12

This is a very old style of coding. This doesn't work out in ANSI. Better use something like

void f(int x)
{
 ... ... ...;/*Whatever is required*/
}
share|improve this answer
    
It works in my computer without any problem!! – Scotia 웃 Mar 21 '14 at 13:13

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