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My question is about the conditional test in trial division. There seems to be some debate on what conditional test to employ. Let's look at the code for this from RosettaCode.

int is_prime(unsigned int n)
{
    unsigned int p;
    if (!(n & 1) || n < 2 ) return n == 2;

    /* comparing p*p <= n can overflow */
    for (p = 3; p <= n/p; p += 2)
        if (!(n % p)) return 0;
    return 1;
}

Wheel factorization or using a predetermined list of primes will not change the essence of my question.

There are three cases I can think of to do the conditional test:

  1. p<=n/p
  2. p*p<=n
  3. int cut = sqrt(n); for (p = 3; p <= cut; p += 2)

Case 1: works for all n but it has to do an extra division every iteration (edit: actually it does not need an extra division but it's still slower. I'm not sure why. See the assembly output below). I have found it to be twice as slow as case 2 for large values of n which are prime (on my Sandy Bridge system).

Case 2: is signficantly faster than case 1 but it has a problem that it overflows for large n and goes into an infinitive loop. The max value it can handle is

(sqrt(n) + c)^2 = INT_MAX  //solve
n = INT_MAX -2*c*sqrt(INT_MAX) + c^2
//INT_MAX = 2^32 -> n = 2^32 - c*s^17 + c^2; in our case c = 2

For example for uint64_t case 2 will go into an infinite loop for x =-1L-58 (x^64-59) which is a prime.

Case 3: no division or multiplication has to be done every iteration and it does not overflow like case 2. It's slightly faster than case 2 as well. The only question is if sqrt(n) is accurate enough.

Can someone explain to me why case 2 is so much faster than case 1? Case 1 does NOT use an extra division as I though but despite that it's still a lot slower.

Here are the times for the prime 2^56-5;

case 1 9.0s
case 2 4.6s
case 3 4.5s

Here is the code I used to test this http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/69497863a97d8953. I also added the functions to the end of this question.

Here is the assembly output form GCC 4.8 with -O3 for case 1 and case 2. They both only have one division. Case 2 has a multiplication as well so my first guess is that case 2 would be slower but it's about twice as fast on both GCC and MSVC. I don't know why.

Case 1:

.L5:
  testl %edx, %edx
  je  .L8
.L4:
  addl  $2, %ecx
  xorl  %edx, %edx
  movl  %edi, %eax
  divl  %ecx
  cmpl  %ecx, %eax
  jae .L5

Case 2:

.L20:
  xorl  %edx, %edx
  movl  %edi, %eax
  divl  %ecx
  testl %edx, %edx
  je  .L23
.L19:
  addl  $2, %ecx
  movl  %ecx, %eax
  imull %ecx, %eax
  cmpl  %eax, %edi
  jae .L20

Here are the functions I'm using to test the time:

int is_prime(uint64_t n)
{
    uint64_t p;
    if (!(n & 1) || n < 2 ) return n == 2;

    /* comparing p*p <= n can overflow */
    for (p = 3; p <= n/p; p += 2)
        if (!(n % p)) return 0;
    return 1;
}

int is_prime2(uint64_t n)
{
    uint64_t p;
    if (!(n & 1) || n < 2 ) return n == 2;

    /* comparing p*p <= n can overflow */
    for (p = 3; p*p <= n; p += 2)
        if (!(n % p)) return 0;
    return 1;
}

int is_prime3(uint64_t n)
{
    uint64_t p;
    if (!(n & 1) || n < 2 ) return n == 2;

    /* comparing p*p <= n can overflow */
    uint32_t cut = sqrt(n);
    for (p = 3; p <= cut; p += 2)
        if (!(n % p)) return 0;
    return 1;
}

Added content after the bounty.

Aean discovered that in case one saving the quotient as while as the remainder is just as fast (or slightly faster) than case two. Let's call this case 4. The following following code is twice as fast as case 1.

int is_prime4(uint64_t n)
{
    uint64_t p, q, r;
    if (!(n & 1) || n < 2 ) return n == 2;

    for (p = 3, q=n/p, r=n%p; p <= q; p += 2, q = n/p, r=n%p)
        if (!r) return 0;
    return 1;
}

I'm not sure why this helps. In any case there is no need to use case 2 anymore. For case 3, most versions of the sqrt function in hardware or software get the perfect squares right so it's safe to use in general. Case 3 is the only case that will work with OpenMP.

share|improve this question
3  
Case 1 shouldn't really involve an extra division: your processor is probably capable of computing both the quotient and remainder in a single instruction, and that's exposed to C (at least in C99) in the form of the div function. Have you tried using that? –  Mark Dickinson Mar 21 at 10:58
1  
Reference for div and ldiv: see section 7.20.6.2 of open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg14/www/docs/n1256.pdf –  Mark Dickinson Mar 21 at 10:59
    
@MarkDickinson, no I have not tried that. I assumed the compiler would do this optimization for me (MSVC2012 and GCC 4.8+)... –  Z boson Mar 21 at 11:49
    
Hmm; yes, I guess it's possible it would, depending on optimisation levels, etc. You could take a look at the assembly output (compile with -S flag) to check. –  Mark Dickinson Mar 21 at 11:51
    
@MarkDickinson, I looked into those functions. They call external functions and don't inline a single instruction. However, I looked at the assembly output of case 1 and 2 and they both only do division once. I don't know why case 1 is so much slower. I updated my answer with the assembly output. –  Z boson Mar 21 at 12:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+50

UPD: This is a compiler optimization issue, obviously. While MinGW used only one div instruction in loop body, both GCC on Linux and MSVC failed to reuse the quotient from previous iteration.

I think the best we could do is explicitly define quo and rem and calculate them in the same basic instruction block, to show the compiler we want both quotient and remainder.

int is_prime(uint64_t n)
{
    uint64_t p = 3, quo, rem;
    if (!(n & 1) || n < 2) return n == 2;

    quo = n / p;
    for (; p <= quo; p += 2){
        quo = n / p; rem = n % p;
        if (!(rem)) return 0;
    }
    return 1;
}

I tried your code from http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/69497863a97d8953 on a MinGW-w64 compiler, case 1 is faster than case 2.

enter image description here

So I guess you are compiling targeted to a 32-bit architecture and used uint64_t type. Your assembly shows it doesn't use any 64-bit register.

If I got it right, there is the reason.

On 32-bit architecture, 64-bit numbers is represented in two 32-bit registers, your compiler will do all concatenation works. It's simple to do 64-bit addition, subtraction and multiplication. But modulo and division is done by a small function call which named as ___umoddi3 and ___udivdi3 in GCC, aullrem and aulldiv in MSVC.

So actually you need one ___umoddi3 and one ___udivdi3 for each iteration in case 1, one ___udivdi3 and one concatenation of 64-bit multiplication in case 2. That's why case 1 seems twice slower than case 2 in your test.

What you really get in case 1:

L5:
    addl    $2, %esi
    adcl    $0, %edi
    movl    %esi, 8(%esp)
    movl    %edi, 12(%esp)
    movl    %ebx, (%esp)
    movl    %ebp, 4(%esp)
    call    ___udivdi3         // A call for div
    cmpl    %edi, %edx
    ja  L6
    jae L21
L6:
    movl    %esi, 8(%esp)
    movl    %edi, 12(%esp)
    movl    %ebx, (%esp)
    movl    %ebp, 4(%esp)
    call    ___umoddi3        // A call for modulo.
    orl %eax, %edx
    jne L5

What you really get in case 2:

L26:
    addl    $2, %esi
    adcl    $0, %edi
    movl    %esi, %eax
    movl    %edi, %ecx
    imull   %esi, %ecx
    mull    %esi
    addl    %ecx, %ecx
    addl    %ecx, %edx
    cmpl    %edx, %ebx
    ja  L27
    jae L41
L27:
    movl    %esi, 8(%esp)
    movl    %edi, 12(%esp)
    movl    %ebp, (%esp)
    movl    %ebx, 4(%esp)
    call    ___umoddi3         // Just one call for modulo
    orl %eax, %edx
    jne L26

MSVC failed to reuse the result of div. The optimization is broken by return. Try these code:

__declspec(noinline) int is_prime_A(unsigned int n)
{
    unsigned int p;
    int ret = -1;
    if (!(n & 1) || n < 2) return n == 2;

    /* comparing p*p <= n can overflow */
    p = 1;
    do {
        p += 2;
        if (p >= n / p) ret = 1; /* Let's return latter outside the loop. */
        if (!(n % p)) ret = 0;
    } while (ret < 0);
    return ret;
}

__declspec(noinline) int is_prime_B(unsigned int n)
{
    unsigned int p;
    if (!(n & 1) || n < 2) return n == 2;

    /* comparing p*p <= n can overflow */
    p = 1;
    do {
        p += 2;
        if (p > n / p) return 1; /* The common routine. */
        if (!(n % p)) return 0;
    } while (1);
}

The is_prime_B will be twice slower than is_prime_A on MSVC / ICC for windows.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. I ran it in MSVC201 64-bit mode release and got: case 1 1.8s, case 2 1.2 s, case 3 1.1 seconds. So case two is still about twice as slow with MSVC2012 in 64-bit mode. Let me try it with GCC on Linux. –  Z boson Mar 25 at 8:36
    
@Z boson MSVC failed to reuse the result of div, I will explain more. Please wait a moment. –  Aean Mar 25 at 8:38
    
Nope, I just booted into Linux and compiled with `g++ -O3 -fopenmp prime.C and I get the same results: case 1 2.0s, case 2 1.0 s, case 3 1.1 s. Case 1 is still twice as slow. I have a E5-1620@3.60GHz (Xeon Sandy Bridge cores). –  Z boson Mar 25 at 8:44
    
Have you checked the assembly output? –  Aean Mar 25 at 8:48
    
No. I'll check later. Just to be clear. I dual boot so I tested MSVC and GCC on the same machine just different OS. –  Z boson Mar 25 at 8:57

sqrt(n) is accurate enough as long as your sqrt is monotone increasing, it gets perfect squares right, and every unsigned int can be represented exactly as a double. All three of these are the case on every platform I know of.

You can get around these issues (if you consider them to be issues) by implementing a function unsigned int sqrti(unsigned int n) that returns the floor of the square root of an unsigned int using Newton's method. (This is an interesting exercise if you've never done it before!)

share|improve this answer
    
Do you have a source about sqrt getting the perfect squares right? I know unsigned in can be represented exactly as double but uint64_t can't be exactly represented by double therefore I don't see why it should be guaranteed to get the perfect squares right. Good point about doing this myself with Newton's method. I have been thinking of doing that. –  Z boson Mar 21 at 17:32
1  
sqrt on most (all?) major platforms is "correctly rounded"---in round-to-nearest mode, it's always within 1/2 ulp of being right, and in the directed rounding modes, it's still within 1 ulp of being right. That implies that it gets the exact cases right (since getting them wrong would imply a difference of at least 1 ulp). IEEE 754 requires that sqrt be provided and correctly-rounded. However, IEEE 754 is not the C standard. –  tmyklebu Mar 21 at 22:38

An answer to only a small portion of this post.

Case 2 fix to deal with overflow.

#include <limits.h>

int is_prime(unsigned n) {
  unsigned p;
  if (!(n & 1) || n < 2)
    return n == 2;

  #define UINT_MAX_SQRT (UINT_MAX >> (sizeof(unsigned)*CHAR_BIT/2))
  unsigned limit = n;
  if (n >= UINT_MAX_SQRT * UINT_MAX_SQRT)
    limit = UINT_MAX_SQRT * UINT_MAX_SQRT - 1;

  for (p = 3; p * p < limit; p += 2)
    if (!(n % p))
      return 0;

  if (n != limit)
    if (!(n % p))
      return 0;
  return 1;
}

The limit calculation fails if both sizeof(unsigned) and CHAR_BIT are odd - a rare situation.

share|improve this answer

About your first question: why (2) is faster that (1)?
Well, this depends on the compiler, maybe.
However, in general one could expect that a division is a more expensive operation than a multiplication.

About your 2nd question: is sqrt() an accurate function?

In general, it is accurate.
The only case that could give you problems is the one that sqrt(n) is an integer.
For example, if n == 9 and sqrt(n) == 2.9999999999999 in your system, then you are in trouble there, because the integer part is 2, but the exact value is 3.
However, this rare cases can easily handled by adding a not so small double constant like 0.1, say.
Thus, you can write:

  double stop = sqrt(n) + 0.1;  
  for (unsigned int d = 2; d <= stop; d += 2)
       if (n % d == 0)
           break;  /*  not prime!! */

The added term 0.1 could add one iteration to your algorithm, which is not a big issue at all.

Finally, the obvious choice for your algorithm is (3), that is, the sqrt() approach, because there is not any calculation (multiplications or divisions), and the value stop is calculated just once.

Another improvement that you can have is the following:

  • Note that every prime p >= 5 has the form 6n - 1 or well 6n + 1.

So, you can alternate the increments of the variable d being 2, 4, 2, 4, and so on.

share|improve this answer
    
Multiplication being faster than division is NOT the reason case 1 is slower than case 2. If I save the quotient and remainder case 1 is slightly faster than case 2. The sqrt function obey's IEEE 754 and therefore will get perfect squares (such as sqrt(9)) so no correction to the sqrt is needed. I agree case 3 is the best in general. I already use a 30 spoke wheel to exclude multiples of 2, 3, and 5 in my own code. –  Z boson Mar 26 at 7:07

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