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I feel like this one should be obvious, but I'm a bit stuck.

I have a DataFrame (df) with a 3-level MultiIndex on the rows. One of the levels of the MultiIndex is ccy and represents the currency that denominates the information contained in that row. Each row has 3 columns of data.

I would like to convert all of the data to be denominated in a reference currency (say USD). To do this, I have a series (forex) that contains foreign exchange rates for the relevant currencies.

So the goal is simple: multiply all the data in each row of df by the value of forex that corresponds to the ccy entry of the index of that row in df.

The mechanical setup looks like this:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
import itertools

np.random.seed(0)

tuples = list(itertools.product(
                                list('abd'), 
                                ['one', 'two', 'three'], 
                                ['USD', 'EUR', 'GBP']
                                ))

np.random.shuffle(tuples)

idx = pd.MultiIndex.from_tuples(tuples[:-10], names=['letter', 'number', 'ccy'])

df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randn(len(idx), 3), index=idx,
                  columns=['val_1', 'val_2', 'val_3'])

forex = pd.Series({'USD': 1.0,
                   'EUR': 1.3,
                   'GBP': 1.7})

I can get what I need by running:

df.apply(lambda col: col.mul(forex, level='ccy'), axis=0)

But it seems weird to me that I would need to use pd.DataFrame.apply in such a simple case. I would have expected the following syntax (or something very much like it) to work:

df.mul(forex, level='ccy', axis=0)

but that gives me:

ValueError: cannot reindex from a duplicate axis

Clearly the apply method isn't a disaster. But just seems weird that I couldn't figure out the syntax for doing this directly across all the columns with mul. Is there a more direct way to handle this? If not, is there an intuitive reason the mul syntax shouldn't be enhanced to work this way?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This now works in master/0.14. See the issue: https://github.com/pydata/pandas/pull/6682

In [11]: df.mul(forex,level='ccy',axis=0)
Out[11]: 
                      val_1     val_2     val_3
letter number ccy                              
a      one    GBP -2.172854  2.443530 -0.132098
d      three  USD  1.089630  0.096543  1.418667
b      two    GBP  1.986064  1.610216  1.845328
       three  GBP  4.049782 -0.690240  0.452957
a      two    GBP -2.304713 -0.193974 -1.435192
b      one    GBP  1.199589 -0.677936 -1.406234
d      two    GBP -0.706766 -0.891671  1.382272
b      two    EUR -0.298026  2.810233 -1.244011
d      one    EUR  0.087504  0.268448 -0.593946
              GBP -1.801959  1.045427  2.430423
b      three  EUR -0.275538 -0.104438  0.527017
a      one    EUR  0.154189  1.630738  1.844833
b      one    EUR -0.967013 -3.272668 -1.959225
d      three  GBP  1.953429 -2.029083  1.939772
              EUR  1.962279  1.388108 -0.892566
a      three  GBP  0.025285 -0.638632 -0.064980
              USD  0.367974 -0.044724 -0.302375

[17 rows x 3 columns]

Here is a another way to do it (also requires master/0.14)

In [127]: df = df.sortlevel()

In [128]: df
Out[128]: 
                      val_1     val_2     val_3
letter number ccy                              
a      one    EUR  0.118607  1.254414  1.419102
              GBP -1.278149  1.437371 -0.077705
       three  GBP  0.014873 -0.375666 -0.038224
              USD  0.367974 -0.044724 -0.302375
       two    GBP -1.355714 -0.114103 -0.844231
b      one    EUR -0.743856 -2.517437 -1.507096
              GBP  0.705641 -0.398786 -0.827197
       three  EUR -0.211952 -0.080337  0.405398
              GBP  2.382224 -0.406024  0.266445
       two    EUR -0.229251  2.161717 -0.956931
              GBP  1.168273  0.947186  1.085487
d      one    EUR  0.067311  0.206499 -0.456881
              GBP -1.059976  0.614957  1.429661
       three  EUR  1.509445  1.067775 -0.686589
              GBP  1.149076 -1.193578  1.141042
              USD  1.089630  0.096543  1.418667
       two    GBP -0.415745 -0.524512  0.813101

[17 rows x 3 columns]

idx = pd.IndexSlice

In [129]: pd.concat([ df.loc[idx[:,:,x],:]*v for x,v in forex.iteritems() ])
Out[129]: 
                      val_1     val_2     val_3
letter number ccy                              
a      one    EUR  0.154189  1.630738  1.844833
b      one    EUR -0.967013 -3.272668 -1.959225
       three  EUR -0.275538 -0.104438  0.527017
       two    EUR -0.298026  2.810233 -1.244011
d      one    EUR  0.087504  0.268448 -0.593946
       three  EUR  1.962279  1.388108 -0.892566
a      one    GBP -2.172854  2.443530 -0.132098
       three  GBP  0.025285 -0.638632 -0.064980
       two    GBP -2.304713 -0.193974 -1.435192
b      one    GBP  1.199589 -0.677936 -1.406234
       three  GBP  4.049782 -0.690240  0.452957
       two    GBP  1.986064  1.610216  1.845328
d      one    GBP -1.801959  1.045427  2.430423
       three  GBP  1.953429 -2.029083  1.939772
       two    GBP -0.706766 -0.891671  1.382272
a      three  USD  0.367974 -0.044724 -0.302375
d      three  USD  1.089630  0.096543  1.418667

[17 rows x 3 columns]

Here's another way via merging

In [36]: f = forex.to_frame('value')

In [37]: f.index.name =  'ccy'

In [38]: pd.merge(df.reset_index(),f.reset_index(),on='ccy')
Out[38]: 
   letter number  ccy     val_1     val_2     val_3  value
0       a    one  GBP -1.278149  1.437371 -0.077705    1.7
1       b    two  GBP  1.168273  0.947186  1.085487    1.7
2       b  three  GBP  2.382224 -0.406024  0.266445    1.7
3       a    two  GBP -1.355714 -0.114103 -0.844231    1.7
4       b    one  GBP  0.705641 -0.398786 -0.827197    1.7
5       d    two  GBP -0.415745 -0.524512  0.813101    1.7
6       d    one  GBP -1.059976  0.614957  1.429661    1.7
7       d  three  GBP  1.149076 -1.193578  1.141042    1.7
8       a  three  GBP  0.014873 -0.375666 -0.038224    1.7
9       d  three  USD  1.089630  0.096543  1.418667    1.0
10      a  three  USD  0.367974 -0.044724 -0.302375    1.0
11      b    two  EUR -0.229251  2.161717 -0.956931    1.3
12      d    one  EUR  0.067311  0.206499 -0.456881    1.3
13      b  three  EUR -0.211952 -0.080337  0.405398    1.3
14      a    one  EUR  0.118607  1.254414  1.419102    1.3
15      b    one  EUR -0.743856 -2.517437 -1.507096    1.3
16      d  three  EUR  1.509445  1.067775 -0.686589    1.3

[17 rows x 7 columns]
share|improve this answer
    
Jeff, thanks for the reply. And sorry for highlighting something that's already been flagged as an issue. For what it's worth, I think my apply column-wise solution, above, is easier to read than the pd.concat... method in your [129]. What do you think? –  8one6 Mar 21 '14 at 13:07
    
using apply will be much slower. –  Jeff Mar 21 '14 at 13:29
    
What is pd.IndexSlice above? –  8one6 Mar 21 '14 at 13:32
    
look at the docs; its a grouping class for multi-index slicing –  Jeff Mar 21 '14 at 13:37
    
Cool...new post 0.13...that seems like a great feature add. –  8one6 Mar 21 '14 at 14:13

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