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I am writing a "Monitor" object to facilitate debugging of my app. This Monitor object can be accessed at run time from an IronPython interpreter. My question is, is it possible in C# to store a reference to a value type? Say I have the following class:

class Test
{
    public int a;
}

Can I somehow store a "pointer" to "a" in order to be able to check it's value anytime? Is it possible using safe and managed code?

Thanks.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 33 down vote accepted

You cannot store a reference to a variable in a field or array. The CLR requires that a reference to a variable be in (1) a formal parameter, (2) a local, or (3) the return type of a method. C# supports (1) but not the other two.

(ASIDE: It is possible for C# to support the other two; in fact I have written a prototype compiler that does implement those features. It's pretty neat. (See http://ericlippert.com/2011/06/23/ref-returns-and-ref-locals/ for details.) Of course one has to write an algorithm that verifies that no ref local could possibly be referring to a local that was on a now-destroyed stack frame, which gets a bit tricky, but its doable. Perhaps we will support this in a hypothetical future version of the language.)

However, you can make a variable have arbitrarily long lifetime, by putting it in a field or array. If what you need is a "reference" in the sense of "I need to store an alias to an arbitrary variable", then, no. But if what you need is a reference in the sense of "I need a magic token that lets me read and write a particular variable", then just use a delegate, or a pair of delegates.

sealed class Ref<T> 
{
    private Func<T> getter;
    private Action<T> setter;
    public Ref(Func<T> getter, Action<T> setter)
    {
        this.getter = getter;
        this.setter = setter;
    }
    public T Value
    {
        get { return getter(); }
        set { setter(value); }
    }
}
...
Ref<string> M() 
{
    string x = "hello";
    Ref<string> rx = new Ref<string>(()=>x, v=>{x=v;});
    rx.Value = "goodbye";
    Console.WriteLine(x); // goodbye
    return rx;
}

The outer local variable x will stay alive at least until rx is reclaimed.

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To make this work properly, the language/framework should allow storage locations to be declared persistent, returnable, or ephemeral, and only allow things of one storage class to be stored to an equally- or more-restrictive class. The return value of a function would be the more restrictive of either its declared return class, or the most restrictive storage class passed into its "returnable" parameters. Such rules would not be useful not only with ref parameters, but to other parameters as well (so code could pass a reference to a mutable class object to a method, and know... –  supercat Sep 18 '12 at 0:36
    
...that any mutations that would ever result from that would be complete before the method in question returned, thus in many situations eliminating the need for defensive copying). –  supercat Sep 18 '12 at 0:37
    
+1 your answer because it solves the persistence problem. I am a bit sad, though, that C# has no mechanism for storing value types as a reference. I do understand this might complicate things for the GC, but referencing value types could really have a great impact on coding techniques. –  David Peterson Feb 12 at 3:22
    
@DJPeterson: You can store a value type as a reference; that's called boxing in C#. I think you meant the opposite: C# has no mechanism for storing a reference to a variable as a value of a field. –  Eric Lippert Feb 12 at 5:34
    
@Eric Lippert That is correct (if I understand correctly). Boxing was something I investigated for my situation but found the lack of type safety and null checks to be unbearable. I could work around that to an extent with wrappers. The deal breaker, though, was the fact that no construct exists for holding a reference to a value type inside of a field while retaining the type information. Without that, I couldn't safely return the reference without boxing, which of course, put the burden of type safety on the consumer rather than the provider of the value - defeating the purpose entirely. –  David Peterson Feb 23 at 19:26

No - you can't store a "pointer" to a value type directly in C#.

Typically, you'd hold a reference to the Test instance containing "a" - this gives you access to a (via testInstance.a).

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But I suppose there is no way to dynamically store something? Like wrapping it in a delegate or such? –  Alex Turpin Feb 13 '10 at 1:05
    
You can always copy it. You can do a closure, but that (indirectly) stores a reference to the containing class... –  Reed Copsey Feb 13 '10 at 1:07
1  
I had been looking all over the Net for how to do this. Would you be so kind as to edit your answer showing a small example please? For now I'm using Reflection, but it gives things like Monitor.Watch(new Property(Game, "FPS")), I'd rather be able to just do Monitor.Watch(Game.FPS) or something simpler at least. –  Alex Turpin Feb 13 '10 at 1:09
    
Can you show some code that demonstrates exactly how your (current) code works? I'd recommend posting that (as a new question), asking for advice on how to improve it (ie: remove magic strings, etc). –  Reed Copsey Feb 13 '10 at 1:15
    

Here is a pattern I came up with that I find myself using quite a bit. Usually in the case of passing properties as parameters for use on any object of the parent type, but it works just as well for a single instance. (doesn't work for local scope value types tho)

public interface IValuePointer<T>
{
    T Value { get; set; }
}
public class ValuePointer<TParent, TType> : IValuePointer<TType>
{
    private readonly TParent _instance;
    private readonly Func<TParent, TType> _propertyExpression;
    private readonly PropertyInfo _propInfo;
    private readonly FieldInfo _fieldInfo;

    public ValuePointer(TParent instance, 
                        Expression<Func<TParent, TType>> propertyExpression)
    {
        _instance = instance;
        _propertyExpression = propertyExpression.Compile();
        _propInfo = ((MemberExpression)(propertyExpression).Body).Member as PropertyInfo;
        _fieldInfo = ((MemberExpression)(propertyExpression).Body).Member as FieldInfo;
    }

    public TType Value
    {
        get { return _propertyExpression.Invoke(_instance); }
        set
        {
            if (_fieldInfo != null)
            {
                _fieldInfo.SetValue(_instance, value);
                return;
            }
            _propInfo.SetValue(_instance, value, null);
        }
    }
}

This can then be used like so

class Test
{
    public int a;
}
void Main()
{
    Test testInstance = new Test();
    var pointer = new ValuePointer(testInstance,x=> x.a);
    testInstance.a = 5;
    int copyOfValue = pointer.Value;
    pointer.Value = 6;
}

Notice the interface with a more limited set of template arguments, this allows you to pass the pointer to something that has no knowledge of the parent type.

You could even implement another interface with no template arguments that calls .ToString on any value type (don't forget the null check first)

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You can literally take a pointer to a value type using usafe code

public class Foo
{
    public int a;
}

unsafe static class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var f=new Foo() { a=1 };
        // f.a = 1

        fixed(int* ptr=&f.a)
        {
            *ptr=2;
        }
        // f.a = 2
    }
}
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class Test
{
    private int a;

    /// <summary>
    ///  points to my variable type interger,
    ///  where the identifier is named 'a'.
    /// </summary>
    public int A
    {
        get { return a; }
        set { a = value; }
    }
}

Why put yourself through all that hassle of writing complicated code, declaring identifiers everywhere linking to the same location? Make a property, add some XML code to help you outside the class, and use the properties in your coding.

I don't know about storing a pointer, don't think it's possible, but if you're just wanting to check its value, the safest way to my knowledge is to create a property of the variable. At least that way you can check its property at any time and if the variable is static, you wouldn't even have to create an instance of the class to access the variable.

Properties have a lot of advantages; type safety is one, XML tags another. Start using them!

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2  
Please refrain from using profanity in your answer. As well as emoticons. Read the FAQ for guidelines. –  ekims Nov 30 '12 at 19:09
2  
This doesn't appear to answer the question. The question as posed includes a public variable, which is nearly the same as the public property that you suggest. –  Michael Myers Nov 30 '12 at 20:00
    
emoticons are habbit from chat clients. not sure what you mean by profanity, i'm just expressing my thoughts. from what i understand, he wants an identifyer that points to the variable, if that was possible he would have to (to my knowledge) make either the variable or the something that accesses it, public. im saying, okay, why not just use a property? in creating an instance of his class 'monitor' inside MAIN or wherever, use that property to check its value. OR make it static and access that property like this; namespace.class.property, when he needs to check the value. an alternative. –  Gorlykio Nov 30 '12 at 21:59

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