Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Frequently I have run into a problem when installing gems that provides a problem like:

Does anyone know what this stems from? I've seen in it several different cases, yet still haven't learned what exactly is causing it.

$ sudo rake gems:install --trace
(in /u/app/releases/20100213003957)
** Invoke gems:install (first_time)
** Invoke gems:base (first_time)
** Execute gems:base
** Invoke environment (first_time)
** Execute environment
rake aborted!
cannot remove Object::ClassMethods
/u/app/releases/20100213003957/vendor/rails/activesupport/lib/active_support/dependencies.rb:603:in `remove_const'
/u/app/releases/20100213003957/vendor/rails/activesupport/lib/active_support/dependencies.rb:603:in `remove_constant'
/u/app/releases/20100213003957/vendor/rails/activesupport/lib/active_support/dependencies.rb:603:in `instance_eval'
/u/app/releases/20100213003957/vendor/rails/activesupport/lib/active_support/dependencies.rb:603:in `remove_constant'
/u/app/releases/20100213003957/vendor/rails/activesupport/lib/active_support/dependencies.rb:549:in `new_constants_in'
/u/app/releases/20100213003957/vendor/rails/activesupport/lib/active_support/dependencies.rb:549:in `each'
/u/app/releases/20100213003957/vendor/rails/activesupport/lib/active_support/dependencies.rb:549:in `new_constants_in'
/u/app/releases/20100213003957/vendor/rails/activesupport/lib/active_support/dependencies.rb:156:in `require'
/u/app/releases/20100213003957/vendor/rails/railties/lib/tasks/misc.rake:4
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:617:in `call'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:617:in `execute'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:612:in `each'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:612:in `execute'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:578:in `invoke_with_call_chain'
/usr/lib64/ruby/1.8/monitor.rb:242:in `synchronize'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:571:in `invoke_with_call_chain'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:564:in `invoke'
/u/app/releases/20100213003957/vendor/rails/railties/lib/tasks/gems.rake:17
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:617:in `call'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:617:in `execute'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:612:in `each'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:612:in `execute'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:578:in `invoke_with_call_chain'
/usr/lib64/ruby/1.8/monitor.rb:242:in `synchronize'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:571:in `invoke_with_call_chain'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:588:in `invoke_prerequisites'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:585:in `each'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:585:in `invoke_prerequisites'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:577:in `invoke_with_call_chain'
/usr/lib64/ruby/1.8/monitor.rb:242:in `synchronize'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:571:in `invoke_with_call_chain'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:564:in `invoke'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:2027:in `invoke_task'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:2005:in `top_level'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:2005:in `each'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:2005:in `top_level'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:2044:in `standard_exception_handling'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:1999:in `top_level'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:1977:in `run'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:2044:in `standard_exception_handling'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/lib/rake.rb:1974:in `run'
/usr/lib64/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.4/bin/rake:31
/usr/bin/rake:19:in `load'
/usr/bin/rake:19
share|improve this question
    
Did you come up with any solution after all? –  Milan Novota Mar 23 '10 at 17:03
    
nope :( Still waiting for help on this one. –  Matthew Mar 26 '10 at 19:34
    
See my definitive answer below –  gtd Aug 13 '10 at 4:10

6 Answers 6

up vote 15 down vote accepted

The cause of this error is a double exception. Usually something in your code is crashing, which raises an initial exception. Then Rails' custom require attempts to keep the namespace clean by removing partially defined constants, which is the purpose of the new_constants_in method. The problem is that new_constants_in is not properly handling some particular construction somewhere within the code, I suspect due to mishandling of module namespaces or something (because ClassMethods is probably inside some module other than Object). In any case, I have not traced the error back to a Rails component or anything else, because frankly it's not worth the effort.

The solution (short of proposing something a little less invasive to Rails core) is a quick hack to figure out what raised the original exception. All you need to do is go to where Dependencies.new_constants_in is called and comment it out (there are a few places where this could be). So for example:

def require(file, *extras) #:nodoc:
  if Dependencies.load?
    Dependencies.new_constants_in(Object) { super }
  else
    super
  end
rescue Exception => exception  # errors from required file
  exception.blame_file! file
  raise
end

Comment out the new_constants_in stuff:

def require(file, *extras) #:nodoc:
#  if Dependencies.load?
#    Dependencies.new_constants_in(Object) { super }
#  else
    super
#  end
#rescue Exception => exception  # errors from required file
#  exception.blame_file! file
#  raise
end

Then you'll see your error straight away.

share|improve this answer

I believe I've found a practical non-intrusive method to get at the root of the problem. It works for me (Rails 2.3) :

As it happens Exception#blame_file! is invoked at some point in spite of the fact that it will fail and cause a new error, thus masking the original error.

So, open your FIRST initializer and add,

class Exception
  def blame_file!( file )
    puts "CULPRIT >> '#{file.to_s}' # #{self.to_s}"
  end
end

You'll get both the incriminated file and the original error message. That should be enough to pinpoint your problem.

Don't forget to remove the Exception initializer snippet.

share|improve this answer
1  
Voting you up because your solution doesn't involve hacking library code, even temporarily. –  Dylan Lacey Jan 11 '12 at 6:15
    
very awesome! You just saved me a boatload of time. –  J_McCaffrey Nov 28 '12 at 15:50

I just came across this problem again. After some debugging I came to this conclusion: this weird error means that Rails has some troubles with requiring some particular library. The problem is that Rails doesn't tell us which library causes the problem. So, the first step you have to do is this:

Open this file (or the appropriate file in your installation): /u/app/releases/20100213003957/vendor/rails/activesupport/lib/active_support/dependencies.rb

and edit the load_with_new_constant_marking method so it looks like this:

def load_with_new_constant_marking(file, *extras) #:nodoc:
  if Dependencies.load?
    Dependencies.new_constants_in(Object) { load_without_new_constant_marking(file, *extras) }
  else
    load_without_new_constant_marking(file, *extras)
  end
rescue Exception => exception  # errors from loading file
    puts "FAILS HERE: " + file
    exception.blame_file! file
    raise
end

From now on, when running your application or a rake task, instead of just telling you that it "cannot remove Object::ClassMethods" Rails will tell you which file causes the problem (just look for the "FAILS HERE" statement). (Btw. I suppose this is what the exception.blame_file! method should be doing, but it obviously doesn't work that way.)

After you have located the file which causes the problem, you can dig into that particular chunk and use some exception blocks to get to the core of the problem.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

I also started catching this bizarre error today -- traced it back to an out-of-date mysql gem .

I'd just switched from using the Mac MySQL package (the one that comes with a PrefPane) to a Homebrew-compiled version and the old /usr/local/mysql was lingering in my PATH

Deleting that directory (and other traces of the old MySQL) and then re-bundling my app solved it!

share|improve this answer

I ran into this issue, and tried each of the above solutions, but to no avail.

In my case, the problem was that I had accidentally included ActionView::Helpers::TextHelper and ActionView::Helpers::NumberHelper at the top of a file (thereby including them into the root Object class), this worked OK in Rails 3.0.0.rc, but raised the "cannot remove Object::ClassMethods" in Rails 3.0.1, and once raised, the app remained stuck until the server was restarted.

share|improve this answer

This started happening with me, but only after I included the delayed_job gem in my bundle. Like Eric above, I included ActionView::Helpers::TextHelper and ActionView::Helpers::NumberHelper at the top of a controller, but the funny thing is that I had no problems whatsoever until I started using delayed_job. I've no idea what's going on, I just removed the includes and the problem seems to have disappeared.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.