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Can someone please thoroughly explain how a '\r' works in Python? Why isn't the following code printing out anything on the screen?

#!/usr/bin/python

from time import sleep

for x in range(10000):
    print "%d\r" % x,
    sleep(1)
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\r (newline) is similar to '\n' (carriage return) –  Cyber Mar 21 at 17:13
    
What platform? Different consoles and terminals handle \r differently; it's a carriage return but some consoles may also clear the line. –  Martijn Pieters Mar 21 at 17:14
    
You need to flush your output buffer. –  Fred Larson Mar 21 at 17:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your output is being buffered, so it doesn't show up immediately. By the time it does, it's being clobbered by the shell or interpreter prompt.

Solve this by flushing each time you print:

#!/usr/bin/python

from time import sleep
import sys

for x in range(10000):
    print "%d\r" % x,
    sys.stdout.flush()
    sleep(1)
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Excuse my ignorance, what is flushing? –  user2538722 Mar 21 at 17:45
    
To improve performance, output is often buffered. That means that it gets stored up in memory until the buffer is full or it gets flushed (actually sent to output). \n will usually flush the buffer implicitly, but you're not printing one. So you need to ask for an explicit flush. –  Fred Larson Mar 21 at 17:47
    
also, I am not quite sure how a '\r' and a comma after a print statement work. Could you also explain that? –  user2538722 Mar 21 at 17:47
    
\r is a carriage return character. As others have said, its behavior depends on what kind of terminal you're using. But many (perhaps most) will move the cursor to the beginning of the current line without creating a new line. Python's print statement normally puts a newline on the end of it's output, but a trailing comma suppresses that. –  Fred Larson Mar 21 at 17:51

'\r' is just a another ASCII code character. By definition it is a CR or carriage return. It's the terminal or console being used that will determine how to interpret it. Windows and DOS systems usually expect every line to end in CR/LF ('\r\n') while Linux systems are usually just LF ('\n'), classic Mac was just CR ('\r'); but even on these individual systems you can usually tell your terminal emulator how to interpret CR and LF characters.

Historically (as a typewriter worked), LF bumped the cursor to the next line and CR brought it back to the first column.

To answer the question about why nothing is printing: remove the comma at the end of your print line.

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You've got those backwards. \n is linefeed, \r is carriage return. –  Jim Stewart Mar 21 at 17:26
    
Thanks @Jim, thats what my first line and the CR/LF part said, then I mistyped. –  Octopus Mar 21 at 17:28

This has nothing to do with \r. The problem is the trailing , in your print statement. It's trying to print the last value on the line, and the , is creating a tuple where the last value is empty. Lose the , and it'll work as intended.

Edit:

I'm not sure it's actually correct to say that it's creating a tuple, but either way that's the source of your problem.

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1  
It's printing on separate lines now. –  user2538722 Mar 21 at 17:20
    
Interpretation of a \r is outside the scope of Python. Your terminal emulator decides what to do. If you're trying to overwrite the same line, and you're seeing multiple lines, that's your terminal at work. If you want to overwrite the same line in a cross-terminal way, you'll need to uses the curses library. –  Jim Stewart Mar 21 at 17:21
    
\r and the trailing comma works just fine for me if I add a flush after each print. –  Fred Larson Mar 21 at 17:31
1  
, at the end of print statement in Python 2.x skips \n which is implicitly printed otherwise. –  Fenikso Mar 21 at 17:32

Do this instead:

print "\r%d" % x,
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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  Rico Mar 21 at 17:54

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