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I have two unsigned int numbers: a and b (b is an unsigned int pointer). I want to copy 8th and 9th bit of a to 2nd and 3rd bit of b(all indices are 0 based).

This is how I am doing it:

 bool secondBit =  (a & (1 << 8) ) ;
 bool thirdBit =   (a & (1 << 9) ) ;

 if (secondBit) {
     *b |= (1u << 2);
 }
 if (thirdBit) {
     *b |= (1u << 3);

Reminder: b is an unsigned int pointer.

Is there a better way of doing this ?

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1  
    
Does endian matter for a question like this? –  Logan Murphy Mar 21 '14 at 17:38
    
a is not a pointer, just an int –  brainydexter Mar 21 '14 at 17:39
    
Note that this doesn't actually reset the bit if it was already set in *b. If that is your intention, then I think your code is clearer than the top answer. –  Matt McNabb Mar 23 '14 at 1:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Clear the relevant bits of *b and set them to the bits you want from a:

*b = (*b & ~0xC) | ((a & 0x300) >> 6);

// This is the 'not' of 00001100, in other words, 11110011
~0xC;

// This zeros the bits of *b that you do not want (b being a pointer)
*b & ~0xC;   // *b & 11110011

//This clears all of a except the bits that you want
a & 0x300;

// Shift the result into the location that you want to set in *b (bits 2 and 3)   
((a & 0x300) >> 6);

// Now set the bits into *b without changing any other bits in *b
*b = (*b & ~0xC) | ((a & 0x300) >> 6);
share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to wrap my head around what you wrote. Can you explain, what are we doing here ? –  brainydexter Mar 21 '14 at 17:42
1  
@brainydexter (1) 0xC is 12, which is represented as ...0 1100 in binary, bitwise negation ~ of which is ...1 0011. And'ing *b with that gives you a *b with its 2nd and 3rd bits cleared. (2) 0x300 is 0x100 + 0x200, which are 8th and 9th powers of 2, meaning that they represent the 8th and 9th bits. And'ing a with that gives you an a with only 8th and 9th bits. Shifting that 6 bits towards right, makes those bits to get located at 2nd and 3rd bits. (3) Or'ing those two result in what you want, so we assign (or he assigns) that to *b –  ThoAppelsin Mar 21 '14 at 17:47
    
Makes sense. Thanks for the detailed explanation @ThoAppelsin ! –  brainydexter Mar 21 '14 at 17:51
    
@brainydexter no problem bro... But god, I hate it when I see a stale direct answer like this, getting so much up-votes... –  ThoAppelsin Mar 21 '14 at 17:52
1  
+1, but I would have shifted a first, and then applied the mask (*b = (*b & ~0xC) | ((a >> 6) & 0xC)) since you have the same mask (modulo the invert) on both sides of the OR. –  pat Mar 21 '14 at 18:04

Depends on your definition of "better" :)

But, well, there is the std::bitset class in C++. Perhaps it suits your needs by offering a less error-prone interface.

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I don't know the implementation of std::bitset, but it is probably less efficient then the "mask, shift, unmask" approach. –  Michael Walz Mar 21 '14 at 17:44
    
Or more efficient. I don't know, I've not measured :) Chances are the actual difference in his real application is too small to be measured. Hard to tell without any context, really. –  Christian Hackl Mar 21 '14 at 17:47

Here's a more verbose way of creating the result you are looking for and code to test the operation.

#include <stdio.h>

void printBits(int n)
{
   int i = 31;
   char bits[32];
   for ( ; i >= 0; --i, n /= 2 )
   {
      bits[i]= n % 2;
   }

   for ( i = 0; i < 32; ++i )
   {
      printf("%d", bits[i]);
      if ( (i+1)%8 == 0 )
      {
         putchar(' ');
      }
   }
}

int foo(int n1, int n2)
{
   // copy 8th and 9th bit of n1 to 2nd and 3rd bit of n2 
   // (all indices are 0 based).

   // Extract the 8th and 9th bits of n1
   int k1 = 0x00000300;
   int r1 = n1 & k1;

   // Clear the 2nd and 3rd bits of n2.
   int k2 = 0xFFFFFFF9;
   int r2 = n2 & k2;

   // Move the 8th and 9th bits of n1 by 6 to the right
   // to put them in 2nd and 3rd places.
   // Construct the result and return.
   return (r1 >> 6) | r2;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
   int n1 = atoi(argv[1]);
   int n2 = atoi(argv[2]);

   printf("Input n1: ");
   printBits(n1);
   printf("\n");

   printf("Input n2: ");
   printBits(n2);
   printf("\n");

   int n3 = foo(n1, n2);

   printf("Result  : ");
   printBits(n3);
   printf("\n");
}

Sample output:

./test-19 251282 85
Input n1: 00000000 00000011 11010101 10010010
Input n2: 00000000 00000000 00000000 10000000
Result  : 00000000 00000000 00000000 10000100
share|improve this answer

In the given code, it does not copy the bits - it just ors them. Should it be doing

*b &= ~0xC0;

first? Then

*b |= ((a >> 6) & 0xC0);
share|improve this answer
    
This is not correct. The first line will zero all bits of *b except bit-0 and bit-1. You meant to AND with ~0xC to zero only bit-2 and bit-3. In general, insert under mask is dst = (dst & ~mask) | (src & mask) where the bits of src are already in the correct position, and mask has a 1 for every bit we wish to insert, and a 0 for every bit we wish to preserve. –  pat Mar 21 '14 at 18:02
    
Thanks - I've corrected the solution –  cup Mar 21 '14 at 20:07

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