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When I send a text message via "AT+CMGS" I get a response from the console "+CMGS: [x]", X is a number that seems to increment with each message I send. Is there a command to set this number back to "0"?

I would like to do something like:

AT+CMGS="<+1xxxxxxxxxx>"

This is a text message.

CTRL-Z

---->Insert command to reset x in "+CMGS: [x]"

UPDATE 1:

To summarize, I would like know how to reset the reference number in the information response to "AT+CMGS" OR disable the information response all together (only for AT+CMGS, I still need the information responses from other commands later in the program.)

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"Here is an example that gives you some idea of how an actual information response should look like: +CMGS: 5,"07/02/05,08:30:45+32" The message_reference Field The first field of the information response of the +CMGS AT command, message_reference, contains an integer in the range from 0 to 255. It is a reference number allocated by the GSM/GPRS modem or mobile phone to the SMS message sent." I have found out that the integer in the response is a "reference number" and not a indication of the number of messages stored in memory. Hope this helps clarify my question better. –  Rob_IGS Mar 21 '14 at 21:11

1 Answer 1

http://www.gsm-modem.de/sms-pdu-mode.html i would think you can set the 'TP-REFERENCE reference number' in 'byte' 0x02 of the pdu yourself so 'the phone would not reference it by itself (like it does when set to 0). no idea what the 'reference number' is for tho, it might be used further along the network to avoid doubles or something. (but from the looks of it you're not using pdu mode, as text mode doesn't even work on half of the stuff out there, i would not know).

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