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I need to be able to convert byte arrays to/from other primitive type arrays, but instead of casting, I need type punning. Correct term for raw copy without casting?

I thought it would be possible to do the following:

// idea: byte[12] -> int[3], and int[3] -> byte[12]

int[] ints;

ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.wrap(
    new byte[]{ 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 2, 0, 0, 0, 3 });
IntBuffer ib = bb.asIntBuffer();

ints = ib.array(); // java.lang.UnsupportedOperationException
ints = ib.duplicate().array(); // java.lang.UnsupportedOperationException

Unfortunately, it seems that bb.asIntBuffer() is not creating a new IntBuffer by copying the content "bitwise" or "raw", but creates a new "view" on existing ByteBuffer. That's why .array() is intended to fail.

I browsed around in JDK's sources, and found few classes, which are used by all these buffer classes and would do the stuff I need, but are internal (such as the class Unsafe).

While I think that my goal could be achieved by wrapping the byte buffer in some ObjectInputStream and read the primitive values by .readInt(), I think it would be a messy and slow workaround.

So, are there any other solutions possible without doing magical primitive type arithmetics (shifting, checking endians, ...)?

NOTE: I need both directions: byte[12] -> int[3], and int[3] -> byte[12]

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Note that if you do the bit shifting yourself you don't have to worry about endianness. Java is always big endian. –  John Kugelman Feb 13 '10 at 8:03
1  
I think the whole point of "type punning" is that precisely there's NO conversion going on (besides the type conversion itself, but this is not modifying the data underneath). I remember lots of C and Assembly fun doing things like that 20 years ago. So I'd say "type punning" is definitely not the right term if you explicitely convert your arrays, for the whole point of "type punning" is to do hacky magic without the cost of conversion. –  SyntaxT3rr0r Feb 13 '10 at 11:54
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

According to the javadoc, array() [1] returns the buffer's backing array which is the array you specify with the call to wrap() [2].

Hence, you must create a new array with the desired type. But the arithmetics can still be handled via the Buffer classes.

ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.wrap(new byte[]{ 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 2, 0, 0, 0, 3 });
IntBuffer ib = bb.asIntBuffer();

int[] intArray = new int[ib.limit()];
ib.get(intArray);

Backwards requires a little bit of calculation by yourself.

ByteBuffer newBb = ByteBuffer.allocate(intArray.length*4);
newBb.asIntBuffer().put(intArray);
byte[] byteArray = newBb.array();

See:

[1] http://java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/nio/ByteBuffer.html#array%28%29

[2] http://java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/nio/ByteBuffer.html#wrap%28byte[]%29

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Great! Never came to the idea to look at those get(...) methods. Consistent API naming rules ;) –  java.is.for.desktop Feb 13 '10 at 8:25
    
Uhm, any idea how to do this backwards (NBuffer to ByteBuffer)? ByteBuffer has all there .asSomething() methods, but IntBuffer does not. –  java.is.for.desktop Feb 13 '10 at 8:50
    
Very nice! And without loops! –  java.is.for.desktop Feb 13 '10 at 12:26
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Many thanks to wierob for his code for converting byte[]->int[] !

I played around a bit to get the opposite direction working.

1) API

// byte[] -> int[]
public static int[] punnedToInteger(byte[] in){
    ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.wrap(in);
    IntBuffer pb = bb.asIntBuffer();

    int[] out = new int[pb.limit()];
    pb.get(out);

    return out;
}

// int[] -> byte[]
public static byte[] punnedFromInteger(int[] in){
    byte[] out = new byte[in.length * Integer.SIZE / Byte.SIZE];
    ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.wrap(out);

    for(int i=0; i<in.length; ++i){
        bb.putInt(in[i]);
    }

    return out;
}

2) Test case

{
    byte[] bytes = new byte[]{ 0,0,0,1, 0,0,1,0, 0,1,0,0, 1,0,0,0 };
    int[] ints = punnedToInteger(bytes);
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(bytes));
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(ints));
    System.out.println();
}
{
    int[] ints = new int[]{ 1, 256, 65536, 16777216 };
    byte[] bytes = punnedFromInteger(ints);
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(ints));
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(bytes));
    System.out.println();
}

3) Output

[0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0]
[1, 256, 65536, 16777216]

[1, 256, 65536, 16777216]
[0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0]
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I've implemented this conversions in Dollar: bitbucket.org/dfa/dollar –  dfa Feb 13 '10 at 11:36
    
please note that int -> byte could be a lossy conversion –  dfa Feb 13 '10 at 11:39
    
Well, I understand that int -> byte cast is lossy. But why type punning could be lossy? –  java.is.for.desktop Feb 13 '10 at 11:47
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