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I'm new to C++. I have the following form of code. I was wondering how I could rewrite this without the use of goto. If I use break in place of it, then I still check the if statement following the loop on every pass through this code even though if I did break I know this condition will fail, so why check it? The only solution I was able to come up with is to make this code a function and replace the goto with a return and remove the if conditional following the loop, leaving just the statements. Would this be a place where goto IS acceptable?

Edit: I should also mention the reason I leave the loop when we find an equal member, is because I don't need to check the remainder of the members in my object cause I already know the one we found is unique to the objects we are iterating, therefore there will never be a match if we continued through the rest of the iterators. So I just exit the loop then.

while (begIt != endIt)
    if ((*begIt).member == someObject.member){
        // Do these statements
        goto someLabel; // then goto someLabel
    }
    ++begIt;
}
if (begIt == endIt){ // We must have not found an equal member
    // So do these statements
}
someLabel: // ...
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1  
If you really don't want to use goto, you could create a function somelable() –  awesomeyi Mar 22 at 1:33
    
please use neither gotos nor lambdas for this..... I have no idea why everybody is suggesting one of those two.... –  example Mar 22 at 1:52
    
@example What's wrong with lambdas? They're perfectly fine. –  Rapptz Mar 22 at 2:35
    
@example: Time to explain your viewpoint, because your answer contains arguably the least readable code of any snippet here. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 22 at 2:39
    
@Rappatz lambdas are great (and I think your answer is good), but using them as a program-flow mechanism by executing them like []{ ... }(); and using return statements inside them only obfuscates the code (and that was the only use of lambdas I saw before commenting). While it might be possible to think of cases where this is an acceptible downside (probably the same cases where gotos are acceptible), this it not one of those. There is no goto or lambda function needed to get this very same behaviour. (see my answer) –  example Mar 22 at 2:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
while (true)
    if (begIt == endIt){ // We must have not found an equal member
        // So do these statements
        break;
    }
    if ((*begIt).member == someObject.member){
        // Do these statements
        break;
    }
    ++begIt;
}

// someLabel: ...

The only solution I would accept in my code. (or seperate function. directly executing a lambda for this is ugly...)

But it is very likely that you are worrying about the wrong things. Inserting a goto will probably not increase performance because the thing that you are intending to "optimize away" is a single conditional (pointer == pointer) which is negligible in 99.9999999% of all programs out there. So even if you are writing high-performance numerical code I would advice you to simple break and check with an if after the loop (I dare you to show me some profiler output to prove me wrong ;) )

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Inserting a goto will probably decrease performance because the compiler will disable some optimization routines Huh? Why's that, then? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 22 at 1:52
    
Well I only want to execute the if (begIt == endIt) once OUTSIDE the while loop if we did not find an equal member. Not on every iteration. –  Wallboy Mar 22 at 2:00
    
@Wallboy what exactly are you worried about? that is a simple if condition. The loop condition that you have is pretty much equivalent to it. –  example Mar 22 at 2:03
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit Unfortunately I cannot find a credible source at the moment. The best I can do at this late hour is an wikipedia quote Although these three control structures can all be hand-coded using gotos and ifs, the desire for clarity and efficient optimization led to the introduction and refinement of supporting structures [...]. While I'm still convinced that the goto will not improve performance, I will still remove the part of my answer about it decreasing performance as long as I have no good source for that. –  example Mar 22 at 2:11
    
@Wallboy It seems to me this really is what you want. The break statements will exit the loop, so it will not keep iterating after the first equal element and the body of the if (begIt == endIt) will only be executed (at most) once. –  example Mar 22 at 2:16

Use algorithms and lambdas.

auto it = std::find_if(begin, end, [&](const A& a) {
    return a.member == other.member;
});

if(it != end) {
    // found
}
else {
    // not found
}
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1  
It's not really the same because he executes a conditional set of statements per found member, and then another behaviour if found. –  Puppy Mar 22 at 1:37
3  
@DeadMG: Actually, it is. This is the canonical answer, though it jumps a few conceptual steps from the OP's code. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 22 at 1:40
    
I have not learned about lambdas yet, but will look into it. Thanks. I just thought I was missing some simple change in my program to get the exact same result without the use of the goto. –  Wallboy Mar 22 at 2:22

This looks like a perfectly reasonable use of goto to me.

There's no spaghetti logic in your code, and don't let the naysayers brainwash you into their lies.

Your alternative is to move the loop and the ensuing conditional into their own function, and return from that function. You could use a lambda to keep all the logic inline:

[&]() {
    while (begIt != endIt)
        if ((*begIt).member == someObject.member){
            // Do these statements
            return;
        }
        ++begIt;
    }
    if (begIt == endIt){ // We must have not found an equal member
        // So do these statements
    }
}();

// ...

You can likely shorten your loop logic using C++'s standard algorithms, anyway.

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Awaiting the downvote explanation that will likely never come. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 22 at 1:38
    
This looks like a perfectly reasonable use of goto to me. This is against the grain of modern software engineering and OP or novice programmers shouldn't be encouraged to use them. If you want to say this in a more qualified fashion (since I do agree this is one of the hardest blocks of code to write in structured programming without a goto) I'll remove. –  djechlin Mar 22 at 2:01
    
@djechlin: "It's against the grain" is not an argument. It is baseless mantra. If you want to present a counter-argument for this scenario, you say it in a more qualified fashion. Blindly following trends is not useful. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 22 at 2:24
1  
@djechlin: You're once again supposing that the popularity of something, or its profit margin, or the number of words written on it, somehow inherently makes it right or proper. Please come back when you have a good argument on why this is not a viable solution for the stated problem. Generalised rhetoric is not a good argument. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 22 at 2:40
1  
@djechlin if your downvote is based on personal issues, then something is clearly wrong here. The answerer made a very valid point that goto hate is simply repeated without any thought given, which you seem to be confirming alright. –  Bartek Banachewicz Mar 22 at 12:53

See Steve McConnell's article for a discussion of ways to refactor gotos. I agree you have one of a few cases that (without C stdlib idioms) are harder to refactor than most intro programming textbooks would suggest, but it's not that hard to refactor and still better to do so.

I agree the above solution that better uses the standard library is best. A standard pattern that works in all languages (that is pure structured programming), is to create a bool foundMatch = false, set it when you find it, and check in your code between the while loop and the goto's label.

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1  
This is no better than the goto. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 22 at 1:40
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit I believe getting into that argument would be outside the scope of the question. –  djechlin Mar 22 at 1:41
    
On the contrary, this question is that argument. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 22 at 1:42
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit I believe the question was "how to rewrite this using goto," not "should one use goto." Similarly if I ask for advice on how to do something in Java I don't expect to get into an argument on whether there are better languages. –  djechlin Mar 22 at 1:43
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit nonetheless, I won't disappoint. Firstly, in many code bases using goto is illegal. The code will not check in. I know you're thinking those companies are probably idiotic. One such company is my former company Bloomberg, and you can argue with their billions of dollars of profit how they're clearly making terrible engineering decisions that are only making them billions of dollars a year if you like. The OP may have such a consideration. If not, other visitors to this question may need this information. –  djechlin Mar 22 at 1:49

AFAIK the idea of using goto has been dead for a while apart from maybe in Windows batch scripts and certainly not in C++ where we have all kinds of flow control magic. This is done primarily to improve code readability and avoid ending up with spaghetti code which is code with so many gotos and labels flying around that it's utter hell to mke head nor tail of, let alone maintain. If you want to jump out of the loop I the break command is what you want. Like so:

bool not_broken;
not_broken = true;
while (begIt != endIt)
    if ((*begIt).member == someObject.member){
        // Do these statements
        not_broken=false;
        break; // quit out of while loop
    }
    ++begIt;
}
if (not_broken && begIt == endIt){ // We must have not found an equal member
    // So do these statements
}
// code continues...

I wouldn't be overly concerned about knowing that begIt wont equal endIt but if this really bothers you then you could set a bool just before you break and use the logical and operator && to check whether or not the while loop was broken. It is important that the bool is first in the if as this will result in the begIt and endIt not being compared when the bool is false.

share|improve this answer
    
I had the break; in place of the goto originally, but I was just bothered by the If condition after the loop knowing that it will fail all the time if we came from the break so why even check it then. And yes I thought of just setting up a "flag" variable where in would set it to true in we found an equal member and then check for that in the if following the loop, but the goto just completely eliminated the need for that. –  Wallboy Mar 22 at 2:09
    
Using a goto may be marginally more efficient but in my opinion it's dirtier and less readable and readability matters. Thinking over this a little more I think this would be better with the while loop in it's own function. –  nettux443 Mar 22 at 2:23

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