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I am a very newbie programmer, so I don't really know much about writing code to protect the application.. Basically, I created a basicMath.h file and created a do while loop to make a very basic console calculator (only two floats are passed through the functions). I use a series of if and else if statements to determine what the users wants to do. (1.add, 2.subtract, 3.multiply, 4.divide) I used a else { cout << "invalid input" << endl;} to protect against any other values, but then I tried to actually write a letter, and the program entered a infinite loop. Is there anyway to protect against users who accidentally hit a character instead of a number?

 `#include <iostream>
  #include "basicMath.h"

  using namespace std;
  char tryAgain = 'y';
  float numOne = 0, numTwo = 0;
  int options = 0;
  int main()
  {
   cout << "welcome to my calculator program." << endl;
 cout << "This will be a basic calculator." << endl;
 do{
    cout << "What would you like to do?" << endl;
    cout << "1. Addition." << endl;
    cout << "2. Subtraction." << endl;
    cout << "3. Multiplication" << endl;
    cout << "4. Division." << endl;
    cin >> options;
    if (options == 1){
        cout << "Enter your first number." << endl;
        cin >> numOne;
        cout << "Enter your second number." << endl;
        cin >> numTwo;
        cout << numOne << " + " << numTwo << " = " << add(numOne, numTwo) << endl;
    }
    else if (options == 2){
        cout << "Enter your first number." << endl;
        cin >> numOne;
        cout << "Enter your second number." << endl;
        cin >> numTwo;
        cout << numOne << " - " << numTwo << " = " << subtract(numOne, numTwo) << endl;
    }
    else if (options == 3){
        cout << "Enter your first number." << endl;
        cin >> numOne;
        cout << "Enter your second number." << endl;
        cin >> numTwo;
        cout << numOne << " * " << numTwo << " = " << multiply(numOne, numTwo) << endl;
    }
    else if (options == 4){
        cout << "Enter your first number." << endl;
        cin >> numOne;
        cout << "Enter your second number." << endl;
        cin >> numTwo;
        cout << numOne << " / " << numTwo << " = " << divide(numOne, numTwo) << endl;
    }
    else {
        cout << "Error, invalid option input." << endl;
    }
    cout << "Would you like to use this calculator again? (y/n)" << endl;
    cin >> tryAgain;
}while (tryAgain == 'y');
cout << "Thank you for using my basic calculator!" << endl;
return 0;
}
 `
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1  
Of course there is a way-- if you post your code we might be able to tell where you went wrong –  antlersoft Mar 22 '14 at 3:56
    
Try if (cin >> options) { // input was a number } else { // input was something else. } –  Raphael Mar 22 '14 at 4:16
    
I'm not sure I understand what you mean? Where should I add the if ( cin >> options)? Before I start the original if statements? –  user3448741 Mar 22 '14 at 4:30
    
That is, replace cin >> options with that if statement above. –  touko Mar 22 '14 at 4:46
    
+1 for caring about user-input validation despite being a novice programmer. –  Christian Hackl Mar 22 '14 at 10:11

3 Answers 3

One way would be to use exception handling, but as a newbie you're probably far from learning that.

Instead use the cin.fail() which returns 1 after a bad or unexpected input. Note that you need to clear the "bad" status using cin.clear().

A simple way would be to implement a function:

int GetNumber ()
{
    int n;
    cin >> n;
    while (cin.fail())
    {
        cin.clear();
        cin.ignore();
        cout << "Not a valid number. Please reenter: ";
        cin >> n;
    }
    return n;
}

Now in your main function wherever you are taking input, just call GetNumber and store the returned value in your variable. For example, instead of cin >> numOne;, do numOne = GetNumber();

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1  
heard ot do while loops? –  Ed Heal Mar 22 '14 at 5:51
    
Sure but then I'd have to put the "Not a valid number" statement in an if (cin.fail()) condition to avoid displaying it the first iteration. I prefer this. –  aakashjain Mar 22 '14 at 5:59

When you input to cin, it is expecting a specific type, such as an integer. If it receives something that it does not expect, such as a letter, it sets a bad flag.

You can usually catch that by looking for fail, and if you find it, flush your input as well as the bad bit (using clear), and try again.

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if (cin >> some_int) { /* it worked */ } –  Ed S. Mar 22 '14 at 5:15

Read a whole line of text first, then convert the line of text to a number and handle any errors in the string-to-number conversion.

Reading a whole line of text from std::cin is done with the std::getline function (not to be confused with the stream's member function):

std::string line;
std::getline(std::cin, line);
if (!std::cin) {
    // some catastrophic failure
}

String-to-number conversion is done with std::istringstream (pre-C++11) or with std::stoi (C++11). Here is the pre-C++11 version:

std::istringstream is(line);
int number = 0;
is >> number;
if (!is) {
    // line is not a number, e.g. "abc" or "abc123", or the number is too big
    // to fit in an int, e.g. "11111111111111111111111111111111111"
} else if (!is.eof()) {
    // line is a number, but ends with a non-number, e.g. "123abc",
    // whether that's an error depends on your requirements
} else {
    // number is OK
}

And here the C++11 version:

try {
    std::cout << std::stoi(line) << "\n";
} catch (std::exception const &exc) {
    // line is not a number, e.g. "abc" or "abc123", or the number is too big
    // to fit in an int, e.g. "11111111111111111111111111111111111"
    std::cout << exc.what() << "\n";
}
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