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The problem is with object's variable:

this.timer

it's not "global", so when I click the stop button the value of the variable is wrong.
If I declare a global variable MyObject (loke var mytimer;) and use it instead this.timer, it works.

This is my code:

<html>
    <head>
        <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
        <title></title>
        <script type="text/javascript" language="JavaScript">               
            var MyObject = {

                init: function(){
                    this.timer = 0;
                    document.getElementById("btn1").onclick = function(){
                        MyObject.RunIt();
                    };
                    document.getElementById("btn2").onclick = function(){
                        clearInterval(this.timer);
                    };

                },

                RunIt: function(){
                    var x=0;
                    this.timer = setInterval(function(){
                x++;
                        document.getElementById("spn").innerHTML=x;
                    }, 1000);

                }

            };


        </script>
        <style type="text/css">
        </style>
    </head>
    <body onload="MyObject.init();">
        <input type="button" id="btn1" value="Run"/>
        <input type="button" id="btn2" value="Stop"/>
        <span id="spn"></span>
    </body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
"When I do it the wrong way it doesn't work"? I don't get what you're asking here... –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Feb 13 '10 at 12:44
    
are you quoting me? –  mariki Feb 13 '10 at 12:47
1  
I asked, why I don't get the real value of this.timer when I click the stop button. –  mariki Feb 13 '10 at 12:48
1  
Incidentally, you have a problem if you click ‘stop’ when it's already stopped, or ‘start’ when it's already started. I suggest setting this.timer to null initially and on stop, then testing this.timer!==null before trying to clear the interval, and also stopping the existing timer before starting a new one. –  bobince Feb 13 '10 at 13:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is this: when you set "onclick" to a function call like that, there's no object reference in the call. The browser calls your function to do the "clearInterval", but "this" is not pointing to your object - in fact, it's pointing at the button element itself.

Here's one way to work around the problem:

var self = this;
document.getElementById('btn2').onclick = function() {
  clearInterval(self.timer);
};

I know that question-askers on Stackoverflow get annoyed sometimes when people urge them to investigate jQuery or some other modern Javascript framework, but it's simply a better way to do things.

share|improve this answer
    
@Pointy: Regarding your last sentence, that's just your opinion. There are plenty of situations where I think it's preferable not to use one of the big JavaScript libraries. –  Tim Down Feb 13 '10 at 13:13
    
about jquery maybe you're right, but If i wanted jquery I would added the necessary tag... –  mariki Feb 13 '10 at 13:14
    
@frunsi, so this answer is also not good? –  mariki Feb 13 '10 at 13:15
    
Nah, my fault! It is correct. –  Frunsi Feb 13 '10 at 13:16

This is a common problem in writing javascript code; the Scope.

in an .onclick method on an element, the scope (this) is the element itself not the class you are in (MyObject).

i use this/that method; like below:

            init: function(){
                this.timer = 0;
                document.getElementById("btn1").onclick = function(){
                    MyObject.RunIt();
                };

                var that = this;
                document.getElementById("btn2").onclick = function(){
                    /** 
                        Here i use 'that' instead of 'this';
                        because 'this' is the button element
                    */
                    clearInterval(that.timer);
                };

            },
share|improve this answer

You can access an object through this only if the object was created by new.

The this in your code refers to the window object. In the event handlers it refers to the respective HTML element.

Read a detailled explanation.

Your MyObject declaration is an object, but lets say that it is not an object instance. There is a difference in JS.

Object instance example:

        function MyClass() {
                this.timer = 0;

                this.RunIt = function() {
                        var x=0;
                        this.timer = setInterval(function(){
                                x++;
                                document.getElementById("spn").innerHTML=x;
                        }, 1000);
                };

                var me = this; // alias to current "this"

                document.getElementById("btn1").onclick = function(){
                    // "this" refers to btn1, use me
                    me.RunIt();
                };
                document.getElementById("btn2").onclick = function(){
                    // "this" refers to btn2, use me
                    clearInterval(me.timer);
                };
        }

        var MyObject = new MyClass();

Note, that there are many different ways to construct objects in JavaScript.

EDIT: it contains another bug: the event handler functions will be executed as members of the HTML element. So this in the handlers refers to the HTML element, not to your object.

EDIT: fixed the code

EDIT: Bad day, don't listen to me ;-)

share|improve this answer
    
That first sentence is absolutely not correct. –  Pointy Feb 13 '10 at 12:54
    
Is there a workaround using the object declaration that I used? –  mariki Feb 13 '10 at 12:57
    
mariki: you can put timer into your MyObject declaration, e.g. var MyObject = { timer:0, ... }. But the you always have to reference it through MyObject.timer - even in RunIt and the other two functions. –  Frunsi Feb 13 '10 at 12:59
    
@frunsi again, that is simply not correct. There are ways of making it work the way he wants it to. –  Pointy Feb 13 '10 at 13:04
1  
@frunsi I suggest you do some reading. It is entirely possible to arrange for the callback to work the way he wants, with the "this" pointer pointing at his object. (Also, the "this" in the original question will NOT refer to the "window" object, it'll refer to the button.) –  Pointy Feb 13 '10 at 13:12

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