Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Today I encountered a rather amazing behavior in java, or is slower than and!

I even made a test case that you can see at the below.Now I wonder why this happens? Am I doing something wrong or does it happen just on my computer? I don't see any reason that or should be slower than and specially with this significant difference. I want to test this phenomenon with some other languages, do you have any idea about this in general?

public class TestClass {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        long[] or = new long[10];
        long[] and = new long[10];
        long lStartTime, lEndTime, difference = 0;
        for (int idx = 0; idx < 10; idx++) {

            lStartTime = System.nanoTime();
            for (int i= 0; i < 1000000000; i++) { 
                int j = i | i+1 ;
            }
            lEndTime = System.nanoTime();
            difference = lEndTime - lStartTime;
            System.out.println("Elapsed milliseconds: " + difference/1000000);
            or[idx] = difference;

            lStartTime = System.nanoTime();
            for (int i= 0; i < 1000000000; i++) {
                int j = i & i+1 ;
            }
            lEndTime = System.nanoTime();
            difference = lEndTime - lStartTime;
            System.out.println("Elapsed milliseconds: " + difference/1000000);  
            and[idx] = difference;
            System.out.println("------------------------------------" );

        }

        long tmp = 0;
        for (long l : or) {
            tmp += l;
        }
        tmp /= 10;
        System.out.println("Elapsed milliseconds for or: " + tmp/1000000);
        tmp = 0;
        for (long l : and) {
            tmp += l;
        }
        tmp /= 10;
        System.out.println("Elapsed milliseconds for and: " + tmp/1000000);
    }
}

results :

Elapsed milliseconds: 1600
Elapsed milliseconds: 1332
------------------------------------
Elapsed milliseconds: 1609
Elapsed milliseconds: 1335
------------------------------------
Elapsed milliseconds: 1609
Elapsed milliseconds: 1335
------------------------------------
Elapsed milliseconds: 1542
Elapsed milliseconds: 1314
------------------------------------
Elapsed milliseconds: 1705
Elapsed milliseconds: 1324
------------------------------------
Elapsed milliseconds: 1559
Elapsed milliseconds: 1315
------------------------------------
Elapsed milliseconds: 1526
Elapsed milliseconds: 1314
------------------------------------
Elapsed milliseconds: 1568
Elapsed milliseconds: 1340
------------------------------------
Elapsed milliseconds: 1551
Elapsed milliseconds: 1318
------------------------------------
Elapsed milliseconds: 1574
Elapsed milliseconds: 1321
------------------------------------
Elapsed milliseconds for or: 1584
Elapsed milliseconds for and: 1325
share|improve this question
    
i think it's different by shifting. but AND only filled up, and OR check each bits,.. – Adrian Preuss Mar 22 '14 at 8:38
    
@AdrianPreuss- I don't understand "i think it's different by shifting", would you please explain? – mok Mar 22 '14 at 8:41
    
Check out the function en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitwise_operator – Adrian Preuss Mar 22 '14 at 8:44
    
You see, the OR must calculated a little bit more than an AND ^^ – Adrian Preuss Mar 22 '14 at 8:45
2  
II can think of several reasons: (i) your measurement methodology is flawed: if you swap the tests, do you get same result? (ii) your processor is better at and-ing than or-ing (on recent Intel processors it should be the same) (iii) the JVM has found an optimisation in one case but not the other. – assylias Mar 22 '14 at 8:51
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Writing correct micro benchmarks like the one you have done is very time consuming and error prone. I recommend using an existing library like e.g. Caliper instead.

Here is a corresponding benchmark done in Caliper (latest git version necessary to compile):

public class BitwiseOperatorPerformance {
    @Benchmark
    public int timeOr(int reps){
        int dummy = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < reps; i++) {
            dummy |= i+1;
        }
        return dummy;
    }
    @Benchmark
    public int timeAnd(int reps){
        int dummy = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < reps; i++) {
            dummy &= i+1;
        }
        return dummy;
    }
}

And here is the test result: link

The result shows, that the performance of the AND and OR operators is exactly the same.

share|improve this answer
    
Really useful, I should learn about it. – mok Mar 22 '14 at 10:05

Bit-Wise OR is not slower than Bit-Wise AND!

Swap between the time-measuring snippets in your code, and you'll get the opposite results:

for (int idx = 0; idx < 10; idx++) {

    lStartTime = System.nanoTime();
    for (int i= 0; i < 1000000000; i++) {
        int j = i & i+1 ;
    }
    lEndTime = System.nanoTime();

    difference = lEndTime - lStartTime;
    System.out.println("Elapsed milliseconds: " + difference/1000000);  
    and[idx] = difference;

    lStartTime = System.nanoTime();
    for (int i= 0; i < 1000000000; i++) { 
        int j = i | i+1 ;
    }
    lEndTime = System.nanoTime();

    difference = lEndTime - lStartTime;
    System.out.println("Elapsed milliseconds: " + difference/1000000);
    or[idx] = difference;

    System.out.println("------------------------------------");
}

I tend to guess that the JVM applies some kind of runtime optimization during the second snippet.

share|improve this answer
    
I completely agree. I tried as immibs and ... said. But what's wrong in my test? – mok Mar 22 '14 at 9:57
    
@mok: As I mentioned at the bottom of the answer, I tend to guess that the JVM applies some kind of runtime optimization during the second snippet. Other than that, I don't think that there's anything wrong with your test, only with your conclusions from this test. – barak manos Mar 22 '14 at 10:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.