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I have a specific function that I want to be executed after 5 seconds. How can i do that in Java?

I found javax.swing.timer, but I can't really understand how to use it. It looks like I'm looking for something way simpler then this class provides.

Please add a simple usage example.

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Do you want to wait 5 seconds and then execute something or do you want to continue doing something else in the 5 seconds? –  whiskeysierra Feb 13 '10 at 15:38
    
i want to continue doing something else –  ufk Feb 13 '10 at 15:40

6 Answers 6

up vote 35 down vote accepted
new java.util.Timer().schedule( 
        new java.util.TimerTask() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                // your code here
            }
        }, 
        5000 
);

EDIT:

javadoc says:

After the last live reference to a Timer object goes away and all outstanding tasks have completed execution, the timer's task execution thread terminates gracefully (and becomes subject to garbage collection). However, this can take arbitrarily long to occur.

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1  
If you run that code, you'll leak threads. Make sure to clean up the timer when you've finished. –  skaffman Feb 13 '10 at 15:40
    
@skaffman: I added a statement from the javadoc. Do you really have to clean up after calling schedule? –  tangens Feb 13 '10 at 15:47
    
It might be OK, but then it might not be. If you run that code fragment multiple times, you'll have loose threads kicking about with no means of tidying them up. –  skaffman Feb 13 '10 at 15:51
2  
import java.util.Timer; import java.util.TimerTask; might make it more obvious that this is not javax.swing.Timer. / Note, if you are using Swing (and actually AWT) you shouldn't be doing anything to change components on non-Event Dispatch Thread (EDT) threads (java.util.Timer tasks bad; javax.swing.Timer actions good). –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Feb 13 '10 at 19:08
    
so how would you go about cleaning up the loose threads? –  cbrook Aug 15 at 14:47

My code is as follows:

new java.util.Timer().schedule(

    new java.util.TimerTask() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            // your code here, and if you have to refresh UI put this code: 
           runOnUiThread(new   Runnable() {
                  public void run() {
                            //your code

                        }
                   });
        }
    }, 
    5000 
);
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Example of using javax.swing.Timer

Timer timer = new Timer(3000, new ActionListener() {
  @Override
  public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
    // Code to be executed
  }
});
timer.setRepeats(false); // Only execute once
timer.start(); // Go go go!

This code will only be executed once, and the execution happens in 3000 ms (3 seconds).

As camickr mentions, you should lookup "How to Use Swing Timers" for a short introduction.

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Something like this:

// When your program starts up
ScheduledExecutorService executor = Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor();

// then, when you want to schedule a task
Runnable task = ....    
executor.schedule(task, 5, TimeUnit.SECONDS);

// and finally, when your program wants to exit
executor.shutdown();

There are various other factory methods on Executor which you can use instead, if you want more threads in the pool.

And remember, it's important to shutdown the executor when you've finished. The shutdown() method will cleanly shut down the thread pool when the last task has completed, and will block until this happens. shutdownNow() will terminate the thread pool immediately.

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Your original question mentions the "Swing Timer". If in fact your question is related to SWing, then you should be using the Swing Timer and NOT the util.Timer.

Read the section from the Swing tutorial on "How to Use Timers" for more information.

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you could use the Thread.Sleep() function

Thread.sleep(4000);
myfunction();

Your function will execute after 4 seconds. However this will pause the entire program...

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2  
It will pause the current thread, not the whole program. –  skaffman Feb 13 '10 at 15:42
    
Yeah, ofcourse :) –  dale Feb 13 '10 at 15:54
    
And it only guarantees that the execution will run after 4sec, which could mean after 10 sec as well! –  questzen Feb 13 '10 at 22:28
    
questzen, you'll find that all the methods here do that. In fact, even if you're scheduling something at the OS level, you generally can only guarantee a minimum elapsed time before an event. –  Ethan Mar 21 '13 at 5:19

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