Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

'man uniq' documents the -f=N and -s=N options which make uniq skip the first N fields/characters respectively when comparing lines, but how would you force uniq to skip the last N fields/characters?

share|improve this question
up vote 8 down vote accepted

you will need to sort your data first if you want to use uniq

 sort file | rev | uniq -f 10 | rev
share|improve this answer
    
uniq without sort removes consecutive identical line which can definitely be useful. – R Samuel Klatchko Feb 13 '10 at 17:56

rev $filename | sort | uniq -f=N | rev

share|improve this answer
1  
anyone care to come up with an argument as to why this behaviour isn't incorporated into uniq as a command line switch/option? – Julius Feb 19 '10 at 12:23

If you want the functionality of sorting first and then keeping only one line for each unique combination of the fields you are sorting on, you can make do with the unix utility sort alone.

As an example, consider the following file, named some_data

a;c;4
a;b;9
a;b;6

We want to sort by the first and second field, and leave the third field alone, so we do a stable sort, like this:

$ sort -k1,1 -k2,2 -t';' --stable some_data

which gives

a;b;9
a;b;6
a;c;4

Now say we'd like to keep only unique combinations of the first and second column. Then we'd do this:

$ sort -k1,1 -k2,2 -t';' --stable --unique some_data

which gives

a;b;9
a;c;4
share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly what I wanted, actually, since sort has better control over what counts as a field than uniq does. Thanks! – Nick Felt Jun 17 '13 at 17:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.