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This sounds simple enough but I haven't been able to figure out how to use a simple SELECT statement to return the current time in GMT.

I have been trying to use CONVERT_TZ() to convert NOW() to GMT based on the server time zone and the GMT time zone but for some reason it returns NULL when I put in the text time zones. The only way I get a result is to actually put in the offsets which is getting way too complicated for what should be a really simple operation. Here is what I mean:

mysql> SELECT CONVERT_TZ(NOW(),@@global.system_time_zone,'GMT');
NULL

mysql> SELECT CONVERT_TZ(NOW(),'PST','GMT');
NULL

mysql> SELECT CONVERT_TZ(NOW(),'-08:00','+00:00');
2010-02-13 18:28:22

All I need is a simple query to return the current time in GMT. Thanks in advance for your help!

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Note: Use UTC time if you need a universal time reference. It's the real reference, not GMT. The latter changes when daylight saving is on. –  culebrón Feb 13 '10 at 16:49
    
@culebron - Thanks for the suggestion! The question still stands. How then can I use a simple select statement to get the current UTC time? –  Russell C. Feb 13 '10 at 16:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

this should work, but with

SELECT CONVERT_TZ(NOW(),'PST','GMT');

i got also NULL as result. funny enough the example in the mysql docu also returns null

SELECT CONVERT_TZ('2004-01-01 12:00:00','GMT','MET');

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/date-and-time-functions.html#function_convert-tz seems you found a bug in mysql. (thanks to +Stephen Pritchard)

you could try:

SET @OLD_TIME_ZONE=@@TIME_ZONE;
SET TIME_ZONE='+00:00';
SELECT NOW();
SET TIME_ZONE=@OLD_TIME_ZONE;

ok is not exactly what you wanted (its 4 queries, but only one select :-)

or you use UTC (doesnt get affected with daylight savings time)

SELECT UTC_TIMESTAMP();
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3  
@Rufinus - Good, I'm not crazy. How can MySQL have a bug in such an important function? The UTC_TIMESTAMP() was exactly what I was looking for. Thanks! –  Russell C. Feb 13 '10 at 17:42

NO BUG in CONVERT_TZ()

To use CONVERT_TZ() you need to install the time-zone tables otherwise MySql returns NULL.

From the CLI run the following as root

# mysql_tzinfo_to_sql /usr/share/zoneinfo | mysql -u root mysql

SEE http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/time-zone-support.html

Thanks

http://www.ArcanaVision.com (SJP 2011-08-18)

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This worked for me almost everytime, but this time convert_tz() returns NULL even after timezone update. strange! and I checked - timezone_xxx tables are full. my server version is 5.0.92, compiled from source (as I always do). Never had this problem before... –  NickSoft Feb 24 '12 at 9:34
2  
Just found out that after filling the zones table PST time zone still does not exist. I read in wikipedia and It looks like that PST is not clear enough for defining a timezone because of daylight saving. Some of the cities use DST some do not. See: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_Time_Zone#Daylight_time . I used Pacific/Los_Angeles rather than PST (to take DST in account). –  NickSoft Feb 25 '12 at 17:31

Note: GMT might have DST UTC does not have DST

SELECT UTC_TIMESTAMP();

I made a cheatsheet here: Should MySQL have its timezone set to UTC?

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After seeing all the answers above and seeing it's unreliable to convert to PST, I just used this:

DATE_SUB(user_last_login, INTERVAL 7 hour)

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sorry, not clear how it's related with the question –  Roman Podlinov Jul 1 '13 at 22:05

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