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I am trying to program tic-tac-toe in R - here are my two functions for making a move and evaluating all valid moves (the ones are X's, zeros are O's and NA is not taken yet):

move <- function(board,square,mark)
{
  if (square < 1 || square > 9 || !is.na(board[square]))
  {
    return(NA)
  }
  else
    board[square] <- mark
    return(board)
}

valid.moves <- function(board)
{
  return(which(is.na(board)))
}

Now setting up a test position, evaluating all valid moves and then make those moves...

test.last <- matrix(c(1,1,NA,0,NA,0,NA,0,1),nrow=3)
moves <- valid.moves(test.last)
move(test.last,moves,1)

...gives a result which I didn't intend:

     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    1    0    1
[2,]    1    1    0
[3,]    1    0    1

I wanted to have three different boards with the respective valid moves (which will then be evaluated with another function whether it is a winning position) and not one board with all valid moves made at once.

I don't want to do this with a loop but the vectorization should not take place all at once 'inside' the move function but 'outside' of it - so basically I want to do the following without a loop (the eval.pos function to evaluate the position is of the form eval.pos <- function(board){}):

for (i in 1:length(moves))
{
  after.moves <- move(test.last,moves[i],1)
  print(after.moves)
  print(eval.pos(after.moves))
}

How can I accomplish this without a loop?

share|improve this question
    
Although, this is just a mapply, see -perhaps- something like Vectorize(move, "square", SIMPLIFY = F)(test.last, moves, 1) –  alexis_laz Mar 22 '14 at 20:31
    
which returns a length-3 vector in this case. You might have had better luck using the arr.ind=TRUE option so you could identify the matrix indices. –  BondedDust Mar 22 '14 at 20:53
    
@IShouldBuyABoat: I tried that but I find this solution a little bit easier because you only have one number as coordinates. –  vonjd Mar 22 '14 at 20:55
    
If one of the answers "works" for you then you need to checkmark it. Otherwise people will assume there remains an outstanding unsolved issue. –  BondedDust Mar 22 '14 at 21:17
    
@IShouldBuyABoat: Thank you, I am well aware how the system works ;-) –  vonjd Mar 22 '14 at 21:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
move2 <- function(board, square, mark) {
  lapply(square, function(x,i,value) `[<-`(x,i,value), x=board, value=mark) 
}

Note that the anonymous function() is needed because [<- is primitive.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: Great thank you. How can I use the output of the function directly as input for my eval.pos function which is of the form eval.pos <- function(board){}? With eval.pos(move2(test.last,moves,1)) I get the following error: Error in board[1, ] : incorrect number of dimensions –  vonjd Mar 22 '14 at 20:48
    
lapply returns a list; I suppose you could use it again for eval.pos also, eg lapply(X, eval.pos) with X being the result of move2 –  Neal Fultz Mar 22 '14 at 20:53
    
Ok, that works too. What is a little bit bulky is that one now has all these lists as containers. Do you think that there could be a solution that does the same trick without lists as with standard vectorization (which also doesn't use lists as containers)? –  vonjd Mar 22 '14 at 20:59
    
@vonjd like sapply? –  rawr Mar 22 '14 at 21:10
    
@rawr: To be honest with you the whole 'apply' family of functions still confuses me! I just want to get a vector back of all the evaluated board positions after the respective valid moves habe been made: eval.pos(move2(test.last,moves,1)) –  vonjd Mar 22 '14 at 21:14

Expanding my suggestion in the comment. How to use matrix indices to generate a list of move options:

 valid.moves <- function(board)
 {
     return(which(is.na(board), arr.ind=TRUE))
 }

> moves <- valid.moves(test.last)
> moves
     row col
[1,]   3   1
[2,]   2   2
[3,]   1   3

> lapply(1:3, function( mv) {start <- test.last 
                             start[matrix(moves[mv,],ncol=2)] <- 1
                             start})
[[1]]
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    1    0   NA
[2,]    1   NA    0
[3,]    1    0    1

[[2]]
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    1    0   NA
[2,]    1    1    0
[3,]   NA    0    1

[[3]]
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    1    0    1
[2,]    1   NA    0
[3,]   NA    0    1
share|improve this answer
    
+1: Thank you! What I find a little bit bulky also with this solution is that one now has a list as a container. Do you think that there could be a solution that does the same trick without a list as is the case with standard vectorization (which also doesn't use lists as containers)? I just want to get a vector back of all the evaluated board positions after the respective valid moves have been made: eval.pos(move2(test.last,moves,1)) –  vonjd Mar 22 '14 at 21:19
1  
A list is the only structure that can deliver three separate matrices in a useful package. If you used sapply you would have gotten a 9 x 3 matrix which would not have seemed as natural for doing the evaluation that I'm guessing you would want to do. Or are you just creating random moves? –  BondedDust Mar 22 '14 at 21:59

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