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If I run this shell script, I get exec causing wget to act goofy.

echo "wget http://www.google.com/ -O -  >> output.html" > /tmp/mytext
while read line
do
exec $line
done < /tmp/mytext

It acts like wget is operating on three different urls

wget http://www.google.com/ -O -  
wget >> 
wget output.html

The first command spits the output to STDOUT and the next two wget commands fail as they are nonsense.

How do I get exec to work properly?

I'm using exec instead of simply calling bash on the file because if I use exec on a large list of wget calls I get more than one wget process spawned. Simply calling bash on a file with a large list of urls is slow as it waits for one wget operation to complete before moving onto the next one.

Versions: GNU Wget 1.15 built on linux-gnu. GNU bash, version 4.3.0(1)-release (i686-pc-linux-gnu)

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm using exec instead of simply calling bash on the file because if I use exec on a large list of wget calls I get more than one wget process spawned.

No.  When exec is called, it does not spawn a new process. It replaces the existing process. See man bash for details.

Simply calling bash on a file with a large list of urls is slow as it waits for one wget operation to complete before moving onto the next one.

True. Fortunately, there is a solution. To run a lot of processes in parallel, run them in the background. For example, to run many wget processes in parallel, use:

while read url
do
    wget "$url" -O -  >> output.html &
done <list_of_urls

The ampersand at the end of the line causes that that command to run in the background in parallel with everything else. The above code will start new wget processes as fast as it can. Those processes will continue until they complete.

You can experiment with this idea very simply at the command prompt. Run

sleep 10s

and your command prompt will disappear for 10 seconds. However, run:

sleep 10s &

and your command prompt will return immediately while sleep runs in the background.

man bash explains:

   If a command is terminated by the  control  operator  &,
   the  shell  executes  the command in the background in a
   subshell.  The shell does not wait for  the  command  to
   finish,  and the return status is 0.
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I feel awful silly. I have no idea why I was looking for a more extravagant solution than just backgrounding the wget op. Thanks! – N Klosterman Mar 22 '14 at 23:35

I think, you can use

exec $(cat /tmp/mytext)
share|improve this answer
    
I just tested that and it behaves the same way where wget acts as if there are three inputs. – N Klosterman Mar 22 '14 at 21:22

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