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create statement and prepare statement: At which point is the server actually contacted in both cases? As in is the DB server contacted when you call createStatement() or prepareStatement()? Is the DB contacted when you set values of a prepared statement? And I am assuming there is definitely a communication when you call execute?

Also, assuming the statement is only being run once so optimisations are less prevalent with the prepare statement, is it equivalent to create a statement and execute? vs prepare, set then execute?

Can you use these methods concurrently? What if I have a web site powered by a DB. I may have many concurrent connections at the same time. Does create, prepare and execute statement allow concurrent calls (as in not crash)? And will it actually execute concurrently or are the methods internally synchronised?

Based on the answer to the above, how is it best to optimise concurrent access? I understand that you can use a connection pool. But if a single connection allows concurrent executes, what is the benefit?

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I think a lot of this (when is the DB contacted) is driver-dependent. –  David Ehrmann Mar 23 at 4:53
    
The Connection that provides these methods isn't thread-safe, so the methods aren't either. –  EJP Mar 23 at 6:11
    
It depends on the database and driver, there is no one answer to this question. Also you are asking +/- 5 (or more) different questions in one question, that is way too broad –  Mark Rotteveel Mar 23 at 9:17

1 Answer 1

Only part of what you're asking, but only one thread should use a Connection/(Prepared)Statement/ResultSet at a time. Generally, it's the same thread, but you could arrange something with awkward handoffs, too. Wanting to do things concurrently is a pretty common thing, so people often pool database connections to save on reconnect time. Take a look at DBCP; it's a connection pool for doing something like running a website that hits a database.

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