Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have been getting a really annoying error about an std::out_of_range when calling substr. The exact error is

terminate called after throwing an instance of 'std::out_of_range'
what(): basic_string::substr

I'm absolutely sure that tmp_request has a length greater then 1. No matter what I pass to substr—1, 2, or bodypos—it always throws that error. I'm using g++ on Unix.

Only interesting thing I can include is the string has multiple "\r\n", including one "\r\n\r\n".

In one cpp file:

std::string tmp_request, outRequest;

tmp_request = SS_Twitter->readData();
outRequest = SS_Twitter->parse(tmp_request);

In another:

 std::string parse(const std::string &request)
 {
  std::map<std::string,std::string> keyval;
  std::string outRequest;
  if(request[0]=='P')
  {
   if(request.find("register")!=std::string::npos)
   { //we have a register request
    size_t bodypos = request.find("username");
    if(bodypos==std::string::npos) 
    {
     HttpError(400,"Malformed HTTP POST request. Could not find key username.",request); 
    }
    else
    {
     std::string body = request.substr(bodypos);
     StringExplode(body,"&", "=",keyval);
     outRequest = "doing stuff";
    }

   }

Update:

std::string request2("P\r\nregister\r\nusername=hello\r\n\r\n");

std::string body = request2.substr(4);

That throws the same error. Now I know this is perfectly valid and correct code, but it's still throwing the error. //removed source link

share|improve this question
3  
Whether or not something is a bug is rarely an opinion, when it comes to language. You should seriously doubt such a primitive function has a bug in the implementation, otherwise you get caught on the wrong thing. The fact you keep persisting your code is right and the implementation is somehow wrong will never solve your problem. Obvious, you have a logical error somewhere; you must drop your assumptions and start fresh. –  GManNickG Feb 13 '10 at 20:36
6  
This is wrong: if(int(request.find("register"))!=std::string::npos). npos is a size_t, an unsigned integer, while int is a signed integer. There is zero need to cast the result of find, and all you're doing is chopping the range in half. In fact, you'll always enter this if-statement, since an int likely can never reach the maximum value of a size_t (which is what npos is). If it's not the bug, it is a bug. –  GManNickG Feb 13 '10 at 20:40
1  
I would suggest logging the length of request and the value of bodypos. That will tell you for certain whether you are seeing bad behavior from substr or whether you passed in bad arguments. –  Omnifarious Feb 13 '10 at 20:40
1  
The only time I've seen a mysterious "bug" in a string method (or in any other place where nothing could possibly be wrong), it had to do with unrelated undefined behavior elsewhere in the program. –  UncleBens Feb 13 '10 at 21:05
1  
I'm not sure why people downvote this question. It's legitimate code with a legitimate problem, let's help the guy find it and clean up our answers so they help others who might have similar troubles. –  Matt Curtis Feb 13 '10 at 21:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I modified your sample slightly to decrease amount of indentation used.
There are 5 "test cases" and none causes any problem. Could you please provide a sample request to reproduce the problem you're having.

EDIT: Forgot to mention: if this sample as it is (with commented-out bits) doesn't produce that error, your best bet is that you have a bug in your StringExplode function. You could post its source, to get a more helpful advice.

EDIT2: In your StringExplode, change results[tmpKey] = tmpKey.substr(found+1); to results[tmpKey] = tmpResult[i].substr(found+1);. Change int found to size_t found, and remove all of if (found > 0), that will fix your mysterious out_of_range. You were substr-ing a wrong string. Just in case, here's the code with a fix:

void StringExplode(std::string str, std::string objseparator, std::string keyseperator,
                   std::map <std::string, std::string> &results)
{
    size_t found;
    std::vector<std::string> tmpResult;
    found = str.find_first_of(objseparator);
    while(found != std::string::npos)
    {
        tmpResult.push_back(str.substr(0,found));
        str = str.substr(found+1);
        found = str.find_first_of(objseparator);
    }
    if(str.length() > 0)
    {
        tmpResult.push_back(str);
    }

    for(size_t i = 0; i < tmpResult.size(); i++)
    {
        found = tmpResult[i].find_first_of(keyseperator);
        while(found != std::string::npos)
        {
                std::string tmpKey = tmpResult[i].substr(0, found);
                results[tmpKey] = tmpResult[i].substr(found+1);
                found = tmpResult[i].find_first_of(keyseperator, found + results[tmpKey].size());
        }

    }
}

Initial test code:

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <string>

std::string parse(const std::string &request)
{
    std::map<std::string,std::string> keyval;
    std::string outRequest;

    if(request[0] != 'P')
        return outRequest;

    if(request.find("register") == std::string::npos)
        return outRequest;

    //we have a register request
    size_t bodypos = request.find("username");
    if(bodypos==std::string::npos)
    {
        // HttpError(400,"Malformed HTTP POST request. Could not find key username.",request);
        // you said HttpError returns, so here's a return
        return outRequest;
    }

    std::string body = request.substr(bodypos);
    // StringExplode(body,"&", "=",keyval);
    outRequest = "doing stuff";

    return outRequest;
}

int main()
{

    std::string request("P\r\nregister\r\nusername=hello\r\n\r\n");
    std::cout << "[" << parse(request) << "]\n";

    request = "Pregisternusername=hello\r\n\r\n";
    std::cout << "[" << parse(request) << "]\n";

    request = "Pregisternusername=hello";
    std::cout << "[" << parse(request) << "]\n";

    request = "registernusername=hello";
    std::cout << "[" << parse(request) << "]\n";

    request = "";
    std::cout << "[" << parse(request) << "]\n";

    return 0;
}

This outputs, predictably:

[doing stuff]
[doing stuff]
[doing stuff]
[]
[]

share|improve this answer
    
I tried hardcoding that string string, and it gives me the same error. Not sure what's going on here :/ std::string request2("P\r\nregister\r\nusername=hello\r\n\r\n"); std::string body = request2.substr(4); –  Stanislav Palatnik Feb 13 '10 at 21:50
1  
@Stanislav Palatnik, could you please post the source for StringExplode? Most likely the bug is there. –  Dmitry Feb 13 '10 at 21:59
1  
@ Dmitry: I posted the complete code in the original post, but here is just the code for StringExplode : pastebin.ca/1795667 @ Curtis: Yes, Dmitry's code runs just fine. –  Stanislav Palatnik Feb 13 '10 at 22:10
2  
@Stanislav Palatnik, check my EDIT2 in the answer, that should help. –  Dmitry Feb 13 '10 at 22:14
1  
Yup, the culprit was StringExplode! Thanks alot! –  Stanislav Palatnik Feb 13 '10 at 22:24

Are you sure that it's failing on that substr and not on a substr call within the HttpError or StringExplode functions? If you haven't already, you should run this through a debugger so that you can see exactly where it's throwing the exception. Alternatively, you could add a:

std::cout << "calling substr" << std::endl;

line immediately before you call substr, and a similar line immediately afterwards, so that it would look like:

std::cout << "calling substr" << std::endl;
std::string body = request.substr(bodypos);
std::cout << "finished calling substr" << std::endl;

StringExplode(body,"&", "=",keyval);
outRequest = "doing stuff";

If that substr really is throwing the exception, then you'll know because the program will print "calling substr" without a matching "finished calling substr". If it prints the pair of debug messages, though, or none at all, then something else is throwing the exception.

share|improve this answer

One fairly obvious thing wrong with your code:

int k = read(ns, buf, sizeof(buf)-1);
buf[k] = '\0';

You are not checking that read() succeeded - it returns -1 on failure which will cause all sorts of memory corruption problems if it occurs.

Also:

char * buf2 = const_cast<char *>(reply.c_str());
write(ns,buf2,sizeof(buf2));

You are taking the size of the pointer - you want the length of the output string:

write(ns, buf2, reply.size() );

And you should once again test that write succeeded and that it wrote as many bytes as you requested, though this shouldn't directly cause the substr() error.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that tip. –  Stanislav Palatnik Feb 13 '10 at 22:06

Looks like you need an else after

if(bodypos==std::string::npos)
{
    HttpError(...);
}

otherwise you are calling substr with bodypos = npos

share|improve this answer
    
No, because HttpError exits the program. I appreciate that advice, but the main reason I posted here is to find out why the substr is failing on Good strings. –  Stanislav Palatnik Feb 13 '10 at 20:33
8  
@Stanislav Palatnik: The way to never find your error is to have a preconceived notion about what the error is. –  Omnifarious Feb 13 '10 at 20:39
    
Create a small test program that includes this code, then call it. Set a breakpoint in the debugger and you'll see your mistake as you examine the variables as you step through code. –  maxpolk Feb 13 '10 at 20:46
2  
For the record, this answer was posted before the else existed, and (obviously) before we knew HttpError would exit the function. A valid but now irrelevant answer. –  GManNickG Feb 13 '10 at 21:04

You might consider using the (unsigned) type std::string::size_type instead of int.

Why are you casting the result of find to an int here: int(request.find("register"))!=std::string::npos

share|improve this answer
    
std::string body = request.substr(bodypos); . Now back to me question :) –  Stanislav Palatnik Feb 13 '10 at 20:32
    
OK I've removed that question from my answer ("Where is the exception happening?") What about my second question: why are you casting to int? find returns an unsigned std::string::size_type –  Matt Curtis Feb 13 '10 at 21:01
    
Hi Stanislav. Since I posted this answer you've edited your original question so the casts are now gone and you use size_t (not std::string::size_type, but you get the idea). Can you please confirm that you've also edited and tested your code, and the exception still occurs? Cheers. –  Matt Curtis Feb 13 '10 at 21:10
    
Yes, it still occurs. I even hardcoded a test string and called substr, and it gave the same error. –  Stanislav Palatnik Feb 13 '10 at 21:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.