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Suppose I want to distribute a Java application.

Suppose I want to distribute it as a single executable. I could easily build a .jar with both the application and all its external dependencies in a single file (with some Ant hacking).

Now suppose I want to distribute it as an .exe file on Windows. That's easy enough, given the nice tools out there (such as Launch4j and the likes).

But suppose now that I also don't want to depend on the end user having the right JRE (or any JRE at all for that matter) installed. I want to distribute a JRE with my app, and my app should run on this JRE. It's easy enough to create a Windows installer executable, and embed a folder with all necessary JRE files in it. But then I'm distributing an installer and not a single-file app.

Is there a way to embed both the application, and a JRE, into an .exe file acting as the application launcher (and not as an installer)?

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3 years on -- looking at the rapid improvement available on the web-based app, I'd say this distribution technique is obsolete. You can build a web-app as good as a desktop app nowadays, and distribute it easily. User don't event have to worry about downloading/installing, and any new releases can take effect immediately –  gerrytan Mar 25 '13 at 4:30
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@gerrytan Kind of a broad assumption to make when you have absolutely no idea what my requirements were! Had the same project been done today, it would have still been distributed as a regular application. –  perp Mar 25 '13 at 8:37
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Regular applications via installer or stand-alone executable will never disappear. There's a ton of reasons why a web-based deployment is not a one-size-fits-all solution. –  SnakeDoc Aug 8 '13 at 15:19
    
Updating for 2013 - check into ej-technologies exe4j product. It will do exactly as you want, it's cheap for a commercial license, and free for opensource projects. Can't beat that! ej-technologies.com/products/exe4j/overview.html –  SnakeDoc Aug 8 '13 at 15:23

9 Answers 9

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Try to use Avian and ProGuard toolkits. Avian allows to embed lightweight virtual machine in you app. Linux, MacOS, Windows and iOS are supported. And ProGuard allows you to shrink large jar file to prepare to embed.

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Quite a few options around, commercially this is very good:

http://www.excelsior-usa.com/jet.html

There are two key open source options GCJ and VMKit

http://gcc.gnu.org/java/ and http://vmkit.llvm.org/

Other more prolonged paths would include IKVM.NET:

http://www.ikvm.net/

Which is a .NET JVM which can be statically compiled to an EXE

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Excelsior JET looks kind of interesting. Will give it a closer look. I'm afraid I don't trust GCJ enough, but I could give it a try. Re: VMKit, wouldn't a JRE implementation for CLI require .NET? –  perp Feb 13 '10 at 21:44
    
VMKit is both a .net and JVM solution in compilation terms, for the JVM side I think it merges in GNU Classpath; but its in beta for the moment, so I think its a little off commercial usage. (The only thing I found limiting with Excelsior JET was no MacOSX support.) –  metismo Feb 14 '10 at 0:31
    
We have free Excelsior JET licenses available for non-commercial use, just in case: excelsior-usa.com/jetfree.html –  Dmitry Leskov Feb 21 '12 at 4:09

Is there a way to embed both the application, and a JRE, into an .exe file acting as the application launcher (and not as an installer)?

If a commercial tool is ok for you, install4j solves this problem very smoothly (see its "Features" page). It can generate both application launchers and installers.

I'd hate to repeat myself too much, so check e.g. this earlier answer where I plugged it (as installer builder, but it doesn't make much difference here).

Summary / bottom line: install4j can create native .exe launchers that absolutely do not depend on a pre-installed JRE (or any other specific libs), and it offers flexible options for bundling (and detecting) JREs.

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I've downloaded a trial version, but I can't really figure out how to make it do what I want. All I can make it do is create an installer? –  perp Feb 13 '10 at 21:36
    
@perp Maybe you can get started by looking at "Step 3: Configure Launchers" in the reference manual: resources.ej-technologies.com/install4j/help/doc/…. Other than that, I'm not sure, as personally I've just created installers. If the manual doesn't help, you could ask their support (which I know to be very good): ej-technologies.com/support/supportRequest –  Jonik Feb 14 '10 at 11:17
    
I just realised that the company behind install4j also has a product called exe4j specifically for creating launchers: ej-technologies.com/products/exe4j/overview.html. I'm not 100% right now if exe4j can do something that install4j doesn't – AFAIK both can create exe launchers with bundled JRE. –  Jonik May 2 '10 at 12:35
    
@Jonik install4j is for creating a bundled exe with embedded jre (or use system jre) to install java applications. exe4j builds a stand-alone exe with bundled jre or use system jre that requires no installation... much like the famed minecraft.exe launcher which requires no isntallation... just double-click it and go. –  SnakeDoc Aug 8 '13 at 15:29

JSmooth can do this according to the documentation. I have only tried it without an embedded JRE, but been very satisfied. It is scriptable with ant and we build on Linux.

http://jsmooth.sourceforge.net/features.php

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Where does it say that? I browsed through it, and all I can see mentioned is that it supports a "bundled" JRE, which isn't the same thing. All I could see on the subject was what's mentioned in section 3.4.2 in the manual... –  perp Feb 13 '10 at 21:10
    
"Sometimes it's more convenient to bundle a JRE with your application. JSmooth can deal with that too, you just need to define in which folder the JRE is expected. It falls back nicely to a standard JVM search if the JRE is not where it should be." I read this as being an unpacked JRE, not an installer. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Feb 13 '10 at 22:01
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Yes, exactly, the .exe can look for a JRE in a specified folder, but I already knew that was possible with several different tools. I'm wondering if there's a solution where the JRE can be embedded inside the application binary itself, which is different. So not "bundle with" but "embed in". :-) –  perp Feb 13 '10 at 22:50
    
Please check this question and give me a solution in case of JSMOOTH stackoverflow.com/questions/5407178/… –  Venky Mar 23 '11 at 15:34
    
@venka, i have not tried the embedded use case myself, and i found tje service launcher not to work well. If you cannot make it work easily and the author is not responsive I suggest using another launcher. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Mar 23 '11 at 16:02

You might take a look at: http://ulibgcj.sourceforge.net/uswt.html It has micro-swt library that make easy to build GUI using SWT and have a look at Eclipse GCJ Builder

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Install4j is a great tool for this kink of purpose.Also you could check out JSmooth or launch4j-all though I have tried to bundle jres with JSmooth and was not able to..

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I know I'm a little late to this party, however it looks like ej-technologies (love their stuff) has a new solution called exe4j which will do exactly as the OP wanted without any funny business needed.

http://www.ej-technologies.com/products/exe4j/overview.html

If you are working in an OpenSource project, they provide free licenses (you just need to contact them). If it's a commercial project, then a license is required... but at $69 USD for a license, it's darn cheap and worth while imho.

From their website:

If you want your own process name instead of java.exe in the task manager
and a user friendly task-bar grouping, exe4j does the job for you.

exe4j helps you with starting your Java applications in a safe way, displaying
native splash screens, detecting or distributing suitable JREs and JDKs,
startup error handling and much more.
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There's a new tool that does this: Packr
https://github.com/libgdx/packr

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