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I am looking for the data structure that would be good for the implementation of a decision matrix with arguments of a non-POD type on the one hand and callback functions on the other hand.

Particularly I would like to use some kind of the one-to-one correspondence between the set/tuple of the arguments and the callback function. In this case presence of a particular set of argument values ​​would lead to an unambiguous definition of the callback, something like that:

template<typename t1, typename t2, ...>
(t1 arg1 == _1_1, t2 arg2 == _2_1, t3 arg3 == _3_1) -> void callback_func_1()
(t1 arg1 == _1_2, t2 arg2 == _2_2, t3 arg3 == _3_2) -> void callback_func_2()
(t1 arg1 == _1_3, t2 arg2 == _2_3, t3 arg3 == _3_3) -> void callback_func_3()
...
(t1 arg1 == _1_n, t2 arg2 == _2_n, t3 arg3 == _3_n) -> void callback_func_n^3()

There should be a search method that will select the callback function that corresponds to the set of arguments with values equal to the given values (in the terms of C++-like pseudocode):

template<typename t1, typename t2, ...>
void CallbackMatrix::SelectCallback(t1& arg1, t2& arg2, t3& arg3, ...)
{
    BOOST_FOREACH(const auto& item, Matrix)
    {
        if( arg1 == item.arg1 && arg2 == item.arg2 && ... )
        {
             item.function();
             break;
        }
    }
}

From my point of view this data structure could be useful for many developers, so I am looking for library implementation of the one (may be, somewhere in Boost?). Although I'll be grateful if someone offers his own version of this data structure.

Thank you.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+100

What you are looking for seems complicated to me. Are you sure you cannot redesign your program to avoid this?

Anyway, let's consider your non-POD type to be the class MyType

struct MyType
{
  int         i;
  double      d;
  std::string s;

  MyType(...) {...} //ctor
  bool operator<( const MyType& other) //define a 'lexicographical' order
  {
    if(      i < other.i 
        || ( i == other.i && d < other.d )
        || ( i == other.i && d == other.d && s.compare( other.s ) < 0 ) )
    {
      return true;
    }
    else
      return false;
  }
};

Then, instead of callbacks, let's use a strategy pattern.

class MyFunc
{
public:
  virtual void function( MyType& ) = 0;
  virtual ~MyFunc() = default;
};

class FirstImpl : public MyFunc
{
public:
  void function( MyType& t ) {...} // do something
};

class SecondImpl : public MyFunc
{
public:
  void function( MyType& t ) {...} // do something else
};

Finally, use a map where keys are of MyType (and this is why we need to overload the operator < in MyType) and values are (pointers to) MyFunc derived objects.

std::map<MyType, MyFunc*> Matrix;
//feed you map
MyType t1( 42, 0., "hey" );
MyType t2( 7, 12.34, "cool" );
MyFunc *f1 = new FirstImpl;
MyFunc *f2 = new SecondImpl;
Matrix.insert( std::make_pair<MyType, MyFunc*>( t1, f1 ) ); // can also use the C++11 map::emplace
Matrix.insert( std::make_pair<MyType, MyFunc*>( t2, f2 ) );

Then, you can call your select function

template<typename t1, typename t2, ...>
void CallbackMatrix::SelectCallback(t1& i, t2& d, t3& s, ...)
{
    for_each(const auto& item : Matrix)
    {
        if( i == item.first.i && d == item.first.d && ... )
        {
             item.second->function( item.first );
             break;
        }
    }
}

Does this solution fit you?

Edit - second solution

Caution: the following is pseudo-code; I didn't try to compile it! But the idea is here.

We still need a MyType class to overload the operator <. Notice that MyType becomes a POD. Is it a problem?

struct MyType
{
  std::vector< boost::any > myVec;

  bool operator<( const MyType& other)
  {
    if( myVec.size() != other.myVec.size() )
      return false;
    else
    {
      for( int i = 0; i < myVec.size(); ++i )
      {
        if( myVec[i] < other.myVec[i] ) // so types must be comparable
          return true;
        else if( myVec[i] > other.myVec[i] )
          return false;
      }

      return false; // meaning myVec and other.myVec are identical
    }
  }
};

Then, SelectCallback becomes

void CallbackMatrix::SelectCallback( std::vector< boost::any > args )
{
  for_each(const auto& item : Matrix)
    if( args.size() == item.first.myVec.size() )
    {
      auto mismatch_pairs = std::mismatch( args.begin(), 
                                           args.end(), 
                                           item.first.myVec.begin() );

      if( mismatch_pairs.empty() ) // if no mismatch
      {
           item.second->function( item.first );
           break;
      }
    }
}

Of course, filling MyType objects with data will be slightly different, like

MyType t1;
t1.myVec.push_back( 42 );
t1.myVec.push_back( 0. );
t1.myVec.push_back( static_cast<char const *>("hey") );    
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your response, I learned a lot from them (especially the strategy pattern). But honestly I need a little more abstract solution (possibly based on variadic templates?) that would provide an opportunity to build and operate the std::map (mentioned in your answer) with any level of MyType complexity (== any number of dimensions). –  Vitaly Isaev Mar 26 '14 at 7:03
    
@VitalyIsaev Ok, I propose a second solution. What do you think? –  Florian Richoux Mar 26 '14 at 10:35
    
Thank you, your second solution is clear for me (so I will award the bounty as soon as site will allow me to do that). The only thing I still can't figure is why are you wrapping the callbacks into the classes, what do we gain from this? –  Vitaly Isaev Mar 26 '14 at 10:52
    
@VitalyIsaev Well, I guess it is a matter of style. If I should implement your problem, I will do this way. But you can indeed use generic callback as map values, using C++11 std::function + std::bind or boost::function + boost::bind. –  Florian Richoux Mar 26 '14 at 12:28

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