Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have the following code (using boost 1.55 on MSVC9):

struct pair_first_impl
{
   template<class TPair> struct result { typedef typename TPair::first_type type; };

   template<class TPair>
   typename TPair::first_type const& operator() (TPair const& pair) const
   {
      return pair.first;
   }

   template<class TPair>
   typename TPair::first_type& operator() (TPair& pair)
   {
      return pair.first;
   }
};

static phx::function<pair_first_impl> pair_first;

int test()
{
   std::map<int, std::string> mymap;
   std::find_if(mymap.begin(), mymap.end(), pair_first(_1) == 1);
}

I'm getting a compiler error regarding pair_first_impl::result::type, which says:

error C2825: 'TPair': must be a class or namespace when followed by '::'
see reference to class template instantiation 'pair_first_impl::result<TPair>' being compiled
        with
        [
            TPair=const pair_first_impl (std::pair<const int,std::string> )
        ]

For some reason, it looks like it is passing in a function type (?) into my TPair template argument instead of the std::pair type directly.

Can anyone help me figure out what I'm doing wrong here?

share|improve this question
    
I know it is not the final goal but can you specialize pair_first_impl::operator() for std::pair<int, std::string>? If that works that might mean that template<...> operator() is too greedy and it is taking everything as argument, even other lazy functions (like _1 itself). – alfC Mar 23 '14 at 18:36
    
Also, I think there is a phoenix:at_c<0> that can do this, I can't find it now. Please post if anything of this worked. – alfC Mar 23 '14 at 18:38
    
I know about at_c but isn't very self documenting, so I'd rather create a lazy function. – void.pointer Mar 23 '14 at 19:02
    
I think it is used simply boost::phoenix::at_c<0>(_1), it is defined in boost/phoenix/fusion/at.hpp, however you may need to make std::pair an adapted fusion sequence first. I'll put this as a an answer to make the code more clear. – alfC Mar 23 '14 at 19:26
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I found the solution by reviewing the result_of protocol documentation (which is separate from phoenix; I was expecting phoenix docs to explain):

struct pair_first_impl
{
   template<class> struct result;

   template<class F, class TPair>
   struct result<F(TPair)>
   {
      typedef typename boost::remove_reference<TPair>::type actual_type;
      typedef typename actual_type::first_type type;
   };

   template<class TPair>
   typename TPair::first_type const& operator() (TPair const& pair) const
   {
      return pair.first;
   }

   template<class TPair>
   typename TPair::first_type& operator() (TPair& pair)
   {
      return pair.first;
   }
};

static phx::function<pair_first_impl> pair_first;

int test()
{
   std::map<int, std::string> mymap;
   std::find_if(mymap.begin(), mymap.end(), pair_first(_1) == 1);
   return 0;
}

The problem was that I thought that the type passed into the template parameter for the nested result struct was the type of the first parameter, which it isn't. It's actually the whole function type. So a template specialization of result must be created the can be used to extract the type of the first argument. You can then use this to access first_type in the pair.

My _1 placeholder is valid because at the top of my source file I'm doing the following:

using namespace boost::phoenix::placeholders;
namespace phx = boost::phoenix;
share|improve this answer

You're using the wrong placeholder _1. You need one that is actually a phoenix actor:

std::find_if(mymap.begin(), mymap.end(), pair_first(phx::placeholders::_1) == 1);

OTOH, your functor has inconsistent result_type protocol. This might not bite you when you use BOOST_SPIRIT_RESULT_OF_USE_DECLTYPE. Why don't you just use a bind? This will get all the deduction correct for you without the work:

using namespace phx::arg_names;

void test()
{
   std::map<int, std::string> mymap;

   using Pair = std::pair<const int, std::string>;
   std::find_if(mymap.begin(), mymap.end(), phx::bind(&Pair::first, arg1) == 1);
}

Of course, you can detect the pair-type if you want.

Full code Live On Coliru

#include <boost/phoenix.hpp>
#include <algorithm>
#include <map>

namespace phx = boost::phoenix;

struct pair_first_impl
{
   template<class TPair> struct result { typedef typename TPair::first_type const& type; };

   template<class TPair>
   typename TPair::first_type const& operator() (TPair const& pair) const {
      return pair.first;
   }

   template<class TPair>
   typename TPair::first_type& operator() (TPair& pair) {
      return pair.first;
   }
};

static phx::function<pair_first_impl> pair_first;


void test1()
{
   using phx::placeholders::_1;

   std::map<int, std::string> mymap;
   std::find_if(mymap.begin(), mymap.end(), pair_first(_1) == 1);
}

void test2()
{
   using Pair = std::pair<const int, std::string>;
   using namespace phx::arg_names;

   std::map<int, std::string> mymap;
   std::find_if(mymap.begin(), mymap.end(), phx::bind(&Pair::first, arg1) == 1);
}

void test3()
{
   std::map<int, std::string> mymap;
   using Pair = decltype(mymap)::value_type;
   using namespace phx::arg_names;

   std::find_if(mymap.begin(), mymap.end(), phx::bind(&Pair::first, arg1) == 1);
}

int main()
{
    test1();
    test2();
    test3();
}
share|improve this answer

This doesn't answer your question, but it gives a workaround that is based on existing implementation: (untested code)

#include <boost/fusion/adapted/std_pair.hpp>
#include <boost/phoenix/fusion/at.hpp>
...
int test()
{
   std::map<int, std::string> mymap;
   std::find_if(mymap.begin(), mymap.end(), boost::phoenix::at_c<0>(_1) == 1);
}

(This without even mention that with C++11 Lambdas you don't need any of this)

Even if this works, your question is a valid one. I suggest two experiments, 1) use enable_if to discard TPair if it is a phoenix expression. 2) Make your operator() more specific to std::pair, like this:

   ...
   template<class T1, T2> // change `result` accordingly.
   T1& operator() (std::pair<T1, T2>& pair)
   {
      return pair.first;
   }
   ...
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.