Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want a Map that throws on attempt to overwrite a value for existing key. I tried:

trait Unoverwriteable[A, B] extends scala.collection.Map[A, B] {
    case class KeyAlreadyExistsException(e: String) extends Exception(e)

    abstract override def + [B1 >: B] (kv: (A, B1)): Unoverwriteable[A, B1] = {
        if (this contains(kv _1)) throw new KeyAlreadyExistsException(
            "key already exists in WritableOnce map: %s".format((kv _1) toString)
        )
        super.+(kv)
    }

    abstract override def get(key: A): Option[B] = super.get(key)
    abstract override def iterator: Iterator[(A, B)] = super.iterator
    abstract override def -(key: A): Unoverwriteable[A, B] = super.-(key)
}

and got:

<console>:11: error: type mismatch;
 found   : scala.collection.Map[A,B1]
 required: Unoverwirteable[A,B1]
               super.+(kv)
                      ^
<console>:16: error: type mismatch;
 found   : scala.collection.Map[A,B]
 required: Unoverwirteable[A,B]
           abstract override def -(key: A): Unoverwirteable[A, B] = super.-(key)
                                                                           ^

I'm quite new to Scala and can't figure out a way to overcome this. Any help? :)

edit: I'm using Scala 2.8.0.Beta1-prerelease (which brings some changes to scala.collection)

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

This fixed your compile error:

trait Unoverwriteable[A, B] extends scala.collection.Map[A, B] {
    case class KeyAlreadyExistsException(e: String) extends Exception(e)

    abstract override def + [B1 >: B] (kv: (A, B1)): scala.collection.Map[A, B1] = {
        if (this contains(kv _1)) throw new KeyAlreadyExistsException(
            "key already exists in WritableOnce map: %s".format((kv _1) toString)
        )
        super.+[B1](kv)
    }

    abstract override def get(key: A): Option[B] = super.get(key)
    abstract override def iterator: Iterator[(A, B)] = super.iterator
    abstract override def -(key: A): scala.collection.Map[A, B] = super.-(key)
}

However, I think you really want to decorate the collection.mutable.Map#+=, as follows:

trait Unoverwriteable[A, B] extends collection.mutable.Map[A, B] {
  case class KeyAlreadyExistsException(e: String) extends Exception(e)

  abstract override def +=(kv: (A, B)): this.type = {
    if (this contains (kv _1))
      throw new KeyAlreadyExistsException("key already exists in WritableOnce map: %s".format((kv _1) toString))
    super.+=(kv)
  }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
In case it's not clear why you want to extend collection.mutable.Map, it's because when you extend an immutable map, each call to + gives you a new map. Since you're creating the new map with a call to super, that new map won't be unoverwriteable! There are two ways out: override everything not with calls to super but with your own routines that take an old immutable unoverwriteable and create a new one with the new element (if allowed); or, use a mutable map and keep adding to the same map instead of replacing it. The latter is much less work. –  Rex Kerr Feb 14 '10 at 19:09

As you are overriding methods in Map, you can't define your trait as the return type.

The easiest solution is to just omit the types:

abstract override def + [B1 >: B] (kv: (A, B1)) = { /* ... */ }
// ...
abstract override def -(key: A) = super.-(key)

Or you could be explicit and add the super type:

import scala.collection.Map
abstract override def +[B1 >: B] (kv: (A, B1)): Map[A, B1] = { /* ... */ }
// ...
abstract override def -(key: A) = super.-(key): Map[A, B]

I think you would only have to override + though, as your other methods only delegate to Map.

share|improve this answer

You can do it using a scala.collection.immutable.Map with a little implicit magic. That is, you define one additional method in the interface and an implicit conversion. Here's how I would do it in 2.7, I'm sure there's different methods to override in 2.8, but you should get the general idea.

trait Unoverwriteable[A, B] extends scala.collection.immutable.Map[A, B] {
    import Unoverwriteable.unoverwriteableMap

    case class KeyAlreadyExistsException(e: String) extends Exception(e)

    def underlying: scala.collection.immutable.Map[A, B]

    def update [B1 >: B] (key: A, value: B1): Unoverwriteable[A, B1] = {
        if (this contains(key)) throw new KeyAlreadyExistsException(
            "key already exists in WritableOnce map: %s".format(key.toString)
        )
        underlying update (key, value)
    }

    def get(key: A): Option[B] = underlying get key 
    def elements: Iterator[(A, B)] = underlying.elements
    def -(key: A): Unoverwriteable[A,B] = underlying - key
    def empty[C]: Unoverwriteable[A,C] = underlying.empty[C]
    def size: Int = underlying.size
}

Then you define the implicit in the companion object:

object Unoverwriteable {
   implicit def unoverwriteableMap[A, B](map0: scala.collection.immutable.Map[A, B]): Unoverwriteable[A, B] =
      new Unoverwriteable[A, B] { def underlying = map0 }

}

To use it add an Unwriteable type annotation to your map. If you uncomment the last 2 lines in the main method, you get a KeyAlreadyExistsException as desired.

object UOMain {
   def main(args: Array[String]): Unit = {
      val map0 = Map((1 -> 1), (2 -> 2)): Unoverwriteable[Int, Int]
      println("map0="+ map0)

      val map1 = map0 - 2
      println("map1="+ map1)

      //val map2 = map1 + (1 -> 1000)
      //println("map2" + map2)
   }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.