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At the moment the only way I can see it is by cycling through the argv argument list, getting the largest of the input strings and creating a new dynamic array with this largest size dictating the memory allocation for each element.

Or is there a more straightforward way?

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3  
Do you need copies, or can you use the originals? Because space was already allocated for them… Can you show what you are really trying to do; as it is, you make me think "huh? why not reference argv directly?" –  Floris Mar 23 at 16:18
    
There might be a more straightforward way but it requires a more straightforward explanation of what you are really trying to accomplish. –  Duck Mar 23 at 16:21
    
I want to prepend another string to the initial argument list. –  user1561108 Mar 23 at 16:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

See if the following helps:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
  char** myStrings;
  int ii;
  myStrings = malloc(argc * sizeof *myStrings);
  for(ii = 0; ii < argc; ii++) {
    myStrings[ii] = malloc(strlen(argv[ii])+1);
    strcpy(myStrings[ii], argv[ii]);
  }
  for (ii = 0; ii < argc; ii++) {
    printf("copied argument %d: it is '%s'\n", ii, myStrings[ii]);
  }
}
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If you define your main with the signature as

int main(int argc, char *argv[]);

then, here argv is an array of pointers to strings passed as command line arguments. Quoting the C99 standard section 5.1.2.2.1 -

The parameters argc and argv and the strings pointed to by the argv array shall be modifiable by the program, and retain their last-stored values between program startup and program termination.

Therefore, you can either directly modify the strings pointed to by elements of argv, or you can copy those strings and then process them.

#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    char *strlist[argc];
    int i = 0;
    while(i < argc) {
        strlist[i] = malloc(1 + strlen(argv[i]));
        if(strlist[i] == NULL) {
            printf("not enough memory to allocate\n");
            // handle it
        }
        strcpy(strlist[i], argv[i]);
        i++;
    }
    // process strlist
    // after you are done with it, free it
    for(i = 0; i < argc; i++) {
        free(strlist[i]);
        strlist[i] = NULL;
    }

    return 0;    
}
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1  
IINM, strings pointed to by argv are modifiable. They certanly aren't string literals. –  jrok Mar 23 at 16:53
    
@jrok you are right. The C99 standard 5.1.2.2.1 says The parameters argc and argv and the strings pointed to by the argv array shall be modifiable by the program, and retain their last-stored values between program startup and program termination. Thanks :) I updated my answer. –  ajay Mar 23 at 17:13

argv is a 'string array' itself: it is an array of char*.

You can simply duplicate it (allocating memory for each element). Using a 2D array of char (as you suggest) for strings might be not a very efficient approach.

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code example for 'duplicate'? –  user1561108 Mar 23 at 16:21
1  
char **my_argv = malloc(argc * sizeof(char*)); for (int i = 0; i < argc; i++) { my_argv[i] = malloc(strlen(argv[i])+1); strcpy(my_argv[i], argv[i]); } // This doesn't include 'NULL' string in the end of argv. –  Inspired Mar 23 at 16:24

This depends on what you want to achieve.

  • You can use argv as it is. argv is already an array of string pointers.
  • You can use a fixed size array, e.g. char argv_copy[7][256]. This means, you can use an array, which is large enough for the expected strings
  • As you suggested, you can go through argv and look for the largest string.
  • You can simply copy the argv structure, which means

    char **argv_copy = malloc((argc - 1) * sizeof(char*));
    int i;
    for (i = 1; i < argc; ++i) {
        argv_copy[i - 1] = malloc(strlen(argv[i]) + 1);
        strcpy(argv_copy[i - 1], argv[i]);
    }
    
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