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I am using rsync to backup a folder regularly to another server, like this, creating a duplicate failsafe version.

rsync --partial --progress -avzl -e ssh /backup_source user@backupserver.com:/backup_dest/ >> /backup.log

I understand it uses compression when transferring the files. I've noticed some unusual differences in the destination folder's storage usage. Depending on the command used on the destination folder, I get:

ls -lart: returns identical list of files with filesize numbers matching between src/dest

du: returned folder size on destination is anywhere from 20-50% of the same du results on the source folder.

If I run "du [filename]" comparison on the same file on the source/destination, the destination is once again 20-50% the size. The contents are often text, and appear to be the same and entirely intact.

How can I account for this file size difference? Is there some sort of compression carrying over to the destination file? Yet how can the file appear identical in contents but take up less space? Confused.

EDIT:

md5sum comparison of a couple files returns the same result, which is a good sign. Still curious about "du" though. Or a more reliable way to compare file size of a directory structure I suppose.

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I'm not sure about this but I think what you're seeing might be a difference in disk usage based on filesystem. Remember, du doesn't really show file sizes , but rather an "estimate" of "file space usage". ls or stat are accurate depictions of file size. Don't use filesize as a checksum. If you want to make sure 2 files are exactly the same, use a real checksum - or a few ( md5/sha comes to mind). –  Dan Farrell Mar 23 '14 at 16:28
    
md5sum comparison of a couple files returns the same result, which is a good sign. –  Miro Mar 23 '14 at 16:35
    
I'm upgrading my comment to answer :) –  Dan Farrell Mar 23 '14 at 16:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think what you're seeing might be a difference in disk usage based on filesystem. Remember, du doesn't really show file sizes , but rather an "estimate" of "file space usage". ls or stat are accurate depictions of file size.

Don't use filesize as a checksum. If you want to make sure 2 files are exactly the same, use a real checksum - or a few ( md5/sha comes to mind). If you think you might be seeing a hash collision ( extremely unlikely), use 2 checksums. The likelihood of having 2 hash collisions with different checksums on the same input data is infinitesimal.

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