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I am quite new to ruby and just to get a hang of it, i tried to solve some project euler problems. The one i am currently stuck on is the #23 problem.

The link: http://projecteuler.net/problem=23

The problem is that the ruby solution keeps running and i was tired waiting.

The solution:

def check(n)
  s=0
  for i in (1..(n/2)+1)
    if n % i == 0 then
      s+=i
    end
  end

  if s>n then
    return true

  end
end

def abundant()
  sum = 0
  for j in (1..28123)
    for k in (1..28123)
      ans = check(j)
      ans2 = check(k)
      if ans == true and ans2 == true then
        sum += (j + k)
      end    

    end
  end
  return sum
end        

a = abundant()
puts a

Any help will be highly appreciated! Thanks!

OK. So i will do some caching later. But i made a few of my own attempts to lessen the looping.

This is the current code now:

def check(n)
  s=0
  for i in (1..(n/2)+1)
    if n % i == 0 then
      s+=i
    end
  end

  if s>n then
    return true
  else
    return false

  end
end

def abundant()
  sum = 0
  for j in (1..28123)
    ans = check(j)
    if ans == false then
      for k in (j..28123)
        ans2 = check(k)
        if ans2 == false then
          sum += (j+k)
        end

      end  
    end
  end
end  

a = abundant()
puts a
share|improve this question
2  
The whole point of Project Euler (which I'm currently trying to do in Haskell, but I'm only on question 12) is that you have to find clever solutions. I've heard anecdotal mention that the first few dozen questions can all be solved on a circa early 90s 486 under-100mhz processor in under 1 minute. Try thinking about how you can remove some of the looping, 28123^2 by itself is a huge number, and you're doing another (1..n/2+1) loop an top of it. For starters, why not check if ans is true before bothering to compute ans2? –  Dan Farrell Mar 23 '14 at 17:00
1  
Building yourself a library of efficient prime number utilities is very important for project Euler ;) –  Chris Ballard Mar 23 '14 at 17:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You should try caching your results - if you already calculated if 13453 is a prime, you don't have to check it again:

@cache = {}
def check(n)
  if @cache[n].nil?
    s=0
    for i in (1..(n/2)+1)
      if n % i == 0 then
        s+=i
      end
    end

    @cache[n] = s>n
  end
  @cache[n]
end

def abundant()
  sum = 0
  for j in (1..28123)
    for k in (1..28123)
      ans = check(j)
      ans2 = check(k)
      if ans == true and ans2 == true then
        sum += (j + k)
      end    

    end
  end
  return sum
end        

a = abundant()
puts a

What this does is save every result (whether a number is a prime or not) in a Hashtable, and before making the calculation, it first checks if the result is already in the Hashtable of saved numbers. That is what caching means.

If you read your code, you'll see that you calculate whether each number is a prime 28124(!) times (once for each iteration in the inner loop, plus one when j==k), this many times, and for a heavy calculation as well... the fact that you re-calculate each number for so many times makes you code a few orders of magnitude slower than when caching the results.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you please explain what caching and BEGIN keyword does –  Bhavya Mar 23 '14 at 17:10
    
added an explanation about caching –  Uri Agassi Mar 23 '14 at 17:20

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