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I'm trying to convert an integer, 0 to 65536, to a Color object in C#. Originally, I thought about creating a list of all the possible 16 bit Colors and addressing them with the integer, but this is very inefficient.

How can I get the ith possible 16 bit Color object?

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First you'll need to define the mapping between ushort and a color. Oh, and surely you mean 65535. – David Heffernan Mar 23 '14 at 21:05
    
Well, what is your addressing scheme? is that a 16-bit palette? or is that 3x5-bit RGB? or 4x4-bit RGBA? or...? If it is a palette, then we don't know what the colo[u]rs are: that needs to be defined separately. A 16-bit palette can reference a 32-bit colo[u]r set. – Marc Gravell Mar 23 '14 at 21:05
    
I'm attempting to use 16 bit high colour. My logic is, in short: if I was to generate every possible 16 bit colour, in order, what colour would occur at point i? – Transmission Mar 23 '14 at 21:10
up vote 4 down vote accepted

A 16 bit color is normally made up of 5 bits of red, 6 bits of green and 5 bits of blue:

rrrr rggg gggb bbbb

Ref: Wikipedia: High color

To turn that into a 24 bit color that the Color structure represents, you would extract the color components and convert them to the 0..255 range:

int red = color >> 11;
int green = (color >> 5) & 63;
int blue = color & 31;

red = red * 255 / 31;
green = green * 255 / 63;
blue = blue * 255 / 31;

Color result = Color.FromArgb(red, green, blue);
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Fantastic, exactly what I was after, thank you! – Transmission Mar 23 '14 at 21:22

The .NET Color struct stores color in 32 bits.

You need to know how your 16 bit color is encoded :

  • R5 G6 B5 (5 bits for red, 6 bits for green, 5 bits for blue)
  • A1 R5 G5 B5 (1 bit for alpha)
  • any other encoding

Let's assume that your 16 bit color is A1 R5 G5 B5.

The target will be A8 R8 G8 B8

public static Color FromUInt16(UInt16 color)
{
    Int32 fullColor = color;

    Int32 maskA = 32768;    // binary 1 00000 00000 00000
    Int32 maskR = 0x7C00;   // binary 0 11111 00000 00000
    Int32 maskG = 0x3E0;    // binary 0 00000 11111 00000
    Int32 maskB = 0x1F;     // binary 0 00000 00000 11111

    // Mask the whole color with bitmasks to isolate each color.
    // for example : 1 11111 11111 11111 (white) masked 
    //with 0 11111 00000 00000 (red) will give : 0 11111 00000 00000
    Int32 alpha =  ((maskA & fullColor) >> 8);
    Int32 red = ((maskR & fullColor) >> 7);
    Int32 green = ((maskG & fullColor) >> 2);
    Int32 blue = ((maskB & fullColor) << 3);

    // 1 bit alpha encoding.
    // if   alpha = 1
    // then alpha = 11111111
    // else alpha = 00000000
    alpha = alpha > 0 ? 255 : 0;

    // Since the original resolution for each color is 5 bits,
    // and the new resolution is 8 bits, the 3 least significant bits 
    // must be padded with 1's if the 5th bit is 1, otherwise pad them with 0.
    red = (red & 0x8) == 0x8 ? red | 0xF : red;
    green = (green & 0x8) == 0x8 ? green | 0xF : green;
    blue = (blue & 0x8) == 0x8 ? blue | 0xF : blue;

    return Color.FromArgb(alpha,red,green,blue);
}
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That's a fantastic answer, but I do have a question. I see PNGs that are themselves 16 bit colour images, which is visible in the image properties. Is there a way to save the image like this? – Transmission Mar 24 '14 at 18:25
    
What do you mean exactly ? Do you want to save a whole image into PNG ? PNG does not just encode images in 16 bits, but also compress them, and compression is a far more complex subject. – Sebastien Guimmara Mar 24 '14 at 18:29
    
Well, for example, here's a PNG that's saved in 8 bit colour. If I'm understanding this right, you could store that image as bit depth 16, and the image would be unchanged, but twice as large. Am I not wasting space or misrepresenting my output by saving it in 24 bit depth when the data is 16? – Transmission Mar 24 '14 at 18:37
    
Yes it would be a waste, because those new bits will add no information into the image, they will merely duplicate existing information (exactly like what I did with padding 1's to the 3 least significant bits). It's like stretching a piece of clothing. You will make it bigger, but in no way there will be more fabric in it. That is, in theory. In practice, maybe the PNG algorithm will perform some smoothing over the colors or other similar stuff that will actually change the information contained in the image. – Sebastien Guimmara Mar 24 '14 at 19:10

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