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Have you ever tried this before?

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int x = 10;
    x = x++;
    Console.WriteLine(x);
}

Output: 10.

but for

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int x = 10;
    x++;
    Console.WriteLine(x);
}

Output: 11.

Could anyone explain why this?

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13  
Wow - I don't think I've ever seen as many incorrect answers to question here... –  Jon Skeet Oct 22 '08 at 14:48
3  
And the moral of the story is to avoid writing that into production code :) –  Robert Paulson Oct 22 '08 at 19:31
    
I totally agree with you, we should avoid writing this pieces of code into production code as Jon said, many incorrect answers, this may cause many problems during any project. –  Ahmed Oct 23 '08 at 10:18
1  
Note that in C and C++, both of these output 11. It all relies on whether the compiler does the assignment first or the post-increment first. C and C++ do assignment first and post-increments after the assignment. –  Alain Aug 24 '11 at 13:15

14 Answers 14

up vote 59 down vote accepted

X++ will increment the value, but then return its old value.

So in this case:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int x = 10;
    x = x++;
    Console.WriteLine(x);
}

You have X at 11 just for a moment, then it gets back to 10 because 10 is the return value of (x++).

You could instead do this for the same result:

static int plusplus(ref int x)
{
  int xOld = x;
  x++;
  return xOld;
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int x = 10;
    x = plusplus(x);
    Console.WriteLine(x);
}

It is also worth mentioning that you would have your expected result of 11 if you would have done:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int x = 10;
    x = ++x;
    Console.WriteLine(x);
}
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2  
x = ++x seems pretty useless, i don't particularly see a reason for either of those constructs... just x++ or ++x .. or what about x = x + ((Ceiling (Abs(x) + 1))/(Ceiling (Abs(x) + 1))) that should work too –  stephenbayer Oct 22 '08 at 15:47
4  
agreed, but I think the question was just asking why it reacts like that. –  Brian R. Bondy Oct 22 '08 at 15:53
3  
First phrase is wrong, x++ it will first return the value and afterwards increment - whereas ++x will first increment, than return the value. –  BeowulfOF Dec 15 '08 at 11:38
7  
The first phrase is not wrong. –  Brian R. Bondy Jan 18 '09 at 15:40

In the assignment x = x++ you first extract the old value of x to use in evaluating the right-hand side expression, in this case 'x'; then, you increment x by 1. Last, you assign the results of the expression evaluation (10) to x via the assignment statement.

Perhaps an equivalent code would make the predicament clear:

var tmp = x;
x++;
x = tmp;

This is the equivalent of your x = x++ code in C#.

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That sounds strange to me... my impression is that the change should've been applied already by the time x hits Console.Writeline –  Jon Limjap Oct 22 '08 at 14:41
    
The problem is the difference between pre-fix and -post-fix. x++ and ++x behave differently. –  jjnguy Oct 22 '08 at 14:44
    
The change was applied but lost in the assignment. If you either use y = x++ instead or if you do x = ++x; the first example will output 11 as well. –  Vinko Vrsalovic Oct 22 '08 at 14:44
    
x is incremented, then set back to 10 (which is the evaluated value of x++) - it's not that it's delayed until after Console.WriteLine. –  Jon Skeet Oct 22 '08 at 14:44
1  
Just trying to keep the misinformation appropriately corrected :) Unfortunately I need to go out now. But hey, I'd have written an answer if the existing correct ones such as yours didn't already do a great job! –  Jon Skeet Oct 22 '08 at 14:52

The behaviour of x++ is to increment x but return the value before the increment. Its called a post increment for this reason.

So x = x++; simply put will increment x first, then assign the original value of x to x.

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x = ++x

would equal 11.

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x++;

does the following:

int returnValue = x;
x = x+1;
return returnValue;

As you can see, the original value is saved, x is incremented, and then the original value is returned.

What this ends up doing is saving the value 10 somewhere, setting x equal to 11, and then returning 10, which causes x to be set back to 10. Note that x does actually become 11 for a few cycles (assuming no compiler optimization).

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This isn't answering the question directly, but why in the world would anyone use

x = x++;

?

It totally defeats the purpose of the post-increment/pre-increment operator.

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May be, no one can use x = x++, but you may face this static void Main(string[] args) { int x = 10; int y = x++; Console.WriteLine(y); } Output: 10. so, why? –  Ahmed Oct 22 '08 at 14:56

You can think of it like this:

int x = 10;

X is a container, and contains a value, 10.

x = x++;

This can be broken down to:

1) increment the value contained in x 
	now x contains 11

2) return the value that was contained in x before it was incremented
	that is 10

3) assign that value to x
	now, x contains 10

Now, print the value contained in x

Console.WriteLine(x);

And, unsurprisingly, it prints out 10.

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By definition, x++, returns the value of x and then increments x.

http://blogs.msdn.com/lucabol/archive/2004/08/31/223580.aspx

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1  
+1 for the link, although your first sentence doesn't really explain why x is still 10 in the first result. –  matt b Oct 22 '08 at 14:38

The first thing you do is called "post-increment" meaning that

    int x = 10;
    x++; //x still is 10
    Console.WriteLine(x); //x is now 11(post increment)

so the moment you assign x = x++; x still is 10 what you could do, if you need x to be 11 at this line write ++x (think its called pre increment correct me if im wrong) ... alternatively right x++; and than x = x++;

question, is it dependend on the line or on statement meaning that it will increment after the ; ?

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Try calling ++x and see if that works.

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Putting the increment operator after the variable means that the increment and assignment happens after the expression is evaluated... so The original statement x = x++; translates to 1. Evaluate x and store value in tyransient memory ... Now execute code called for by ++ operator .... (steps 2 & 3) 2. Increment value of x (in transient memory) 3. Assign Incremented value to x's storage location ... Now, continue with rest of the line's execution, to the left, there's an = sign... 5. So assign value stored in Step 1 (unincremented value) to expression on left of = sign... which is x

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As a standalone statement, x++; is both an increment and assignment. It seems that there is some confusions as to what happens when. If we have

int x = 10;
int y = (x++) + 2;

We will get x = 11 and y = 12. The current value of x is assigned, and then the increment and reassignment of x takes place. So, when using the same variable,

int x = 10; // Create a variable x, and assign an initial value of 10.
x = x++;    // First, assign the current value of x to x. (x = x)
            // Second, increment x by one. (x++ - first part)
            // Third, assign the new value of x to x. (x++ - second part)

Any way you look at it, the new value of x is 11.

I was completely wrong on that one.

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No, the correct sequence is "determine the current value of x and remember it; increment x; assign the remembered value to x" - hence the final value of x is 10. –  Jon Skeet Oct 22 '08 at 14:46
    
The final value is 10. –  Ahmed Oct 22 '08 at 14:48
3  
Wow. It is 10. I'm editing my own garbage. –  Jarrett Meyer Oct 22 '08 at 15:40

Simple explanation:

x++ is a postfix incrementation.

What the compiler does:

a) Assign the value of x to x b) Increase a temporary value of x (I guess it may be even optimized away) c) Throw away temporary value of x

If you want the code to return 11 with the assignment, write:

x = ++x;

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Why do you give an answer to an two years old question that is already correct answered? Not enough you give also just the same answer as it is already been given. –  Oliver Jun 2 '10 at 8:17
2  
Because I can! :-D –  stormianrootsolver Jun 2 '10 at 8:26

The result of the assignment

x = x++;

is undefined in C and C++, and I would guess the same with C# too.

So, the actual sequence of operations that occurs depends on how the compiler decides to implements it, there's no guarantee whether the assignment or the increment will occur first. (this is well defined in C#, as Jon Skeet has pointed out in the comments. Though I now feel this answer is of much less value now, I'm keeping this post undeleted for the OP's question and its answer in the comments.)

However, in this case, it appears the sequence of operations that happens is:

  1. the old value (10) of x is saved
  2. x is incremented for the ++ part
  3. the old value is now assigned to x for the assignment

In this way, though the increment occurs, it is overtaken by the assignment with old value, thus keeping x at 10.

HTH

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It's very well-defined in C#, which is generally a saner language than C or C++ when it comes to this kind of thing. –  Jon Skeet Oct 22 '08 at 14:42
    
3. the old value is now assigned to x for the assignment Why the old value, not the value afetr it's incremented? –  Ahmed Oct 22 '08 at 14:43
    
Because the value of a post-increment expression is the result before it was incremented. –  Jon Skeet Oct 22 '08 at 14:49

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