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Dictionary<string,double> myDict = new Dictionary();
//...
foreach (KeyValuePair<string,double> kvp in myDict)
 {
     kvp.Value = Math.Round(kvp.Value, 3);
}

I get an error: "Property or indexer 'System.Collections.Generic.KeyValuePair.Value' cannot be assigned to -- it is read only."
How can I iterate through myDict and change values?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 52 down vote accepted

According to MSDN:

The foreach statement is a wrapper around the enumerator, which allows only reading from the collection, not writing to it.

Use this:

var dictionary = new Dictionary<string, double>();
var keys = new List<string>(dictionary.Keys);
foreach (string key in keys)
{
   dictionary[key] = Math.Round(dictionary[key], 3);
}
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3  
I tested your example in .NET 2 and 3.5 and it throws 'Collection was modified exception'. See: stackoverflow.com/questions/1562729/… Has this changed in .NET 4 or did you not test your example? –  Ash Feb 19 '11 at 3:39
    
Doesn't work in .NET 4 either –  foson Nov 6 '11 at 3:23
1  
How embarrassing - I left out the part where the list is populated. Fixed now. The idea here is that you can change the dictionary entry's value, just not its reference. –  Justin R. Nov 8 '11 at 19:00

For the lazy programmers:

Dictionary<string, double> dictionary = new Dictionary<string, double>();
foreach (var key in dictionary.Keys.ToList())
{
   dictionary[key] = Math.Round(dictionary[key], 3);
}
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As I'm coding now with .NET 4.5, the ToList() method is unavailable, but the Keys member is iterable so .ToList() is unnecessary. –  Mike C Feb 13 at 22:58

You shouldn't change the dictionary while iterating it, otherwise you get an exception.

So first copy the key-value pairs to a temp list and then iterate through this temp list and then change your dictionary:

Dictionary<string, double> myDict = new Dictionary<string, double>();

// a few values to play with
myDict["a"] = 2.200001;
myDict["b"] = 77777.3333;
myDict["c"] = 2.3459999999;

// prepare the temp list
List<KeyValuePair<string, double>> list = new List<KeyValuePair<string, double>>(myDict);

// iterate through the list and then change the dictionary object
foreach (KeyValuePair<string, double> kvp in list)
{
    myDict[kvp.Key] = Math.Round(kvp.Value, 3);
}


// print the output
foreach (var pair in myDict)
{
    Console.WriteLine(pair.Key + " = " + pair.Value);
}

// uncomment if needed
// Console.ReadLine();

output (on my machine):

a = 2.2
b = 77777.333
c = 2.346

Note: in terms of performance, this solution is a bit better than currently posted solutions, since the value is already assigned with the key, and there's no need to fetch it again from the dictionary object.

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That is probably the approach I will follow, but would love to know the overhead of copying the full dictionary. –  Alberto May 24 at 15:10

One solution would be to put the keys in a list(or another collection) beforehand and iterate through the them while changing the dictionary

Dictionary<string, double> dictionary = new Dictionary<string, double>();
// populate it
List<string> keys = new List<string>(dictionary.Keys);    
foreach (string key in keys)
{
   dictionary[key] = Math.Round(dictionary[key], 3);
}
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I noticed that fastest way (at this moment) iterate over Dictionary with modify is:

//Just a dumb class
class Test<T>
{
    public T value;

    public Test() { }
    public Test(T v) { value = v; }
}

Dictionary<int, Test<object>> dic = new Dictionary<int, Test<object>>();
//Init dictionary
foreach (KeyValuePair<int, Test> pair in dic)
{
    pair.Value.value = TheObject;//Modify
}

VS

List<int> keys = new List<int>(dic.Keys); //This is fast operation   
foreach (int key in keys)
{
    dic[key] = TheObject;
}

First one takes about 2.2s and second one 4.5s (tested dictionary size of 1000 and repeated 10k time, changing dictionary size to 10 didn't change the ratios). Also there wasn't a big deal with getting the Key list, dictionary[key] value get is just slow VS built in iteration. Also if you want even more speed use hard coded type to dumb ("Test") class, with that I got it about 1.85s (with hard coded to "object").

EDIT:

Anna has posted the same solution before: http://stackoverflow.com/a/6515474/766304

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While iterating over the dictionary directly is not possible because you get an exception (like Ron already said), you don't need to use a temp list to solve the problem.

Instead use not the foreach, but a for loop to iterate through the dictionary and change the values with indexed access:

Dictionary<string, double> myDict = new Dictionary<string,double>();
//...    
for(int i = 0; i < myDict.Count; i++) {
    myDict[myDict.ElementAt(i).Key] = Math.Round(myDict.ElementAt(i).Value, 3);
}
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Although this will work, Enumerable.ElementAt() - which is the extension method you are using - is an O(n) operation for non-IList<>s. –  Eugene Beresovsky Jan 7 at 6:58

Loop through the keys in the dictionary, not the KeyValuePairs.

Dictionary<string, double> myDict = new Dictionary<string, double>();
//...
foreach (string key in myDict.Keys)
{
    myDict[key] = Math.Round(myDict[key], 3);
}
share|improve this answer
6  
Surprisingly it throws a "Collection modified..." exception. –  Slauma Mar 6 '14 at 19:15
    
@Slauma Indeed surprisingly, as this change is not a structural change, therefore having the enumerator throw would in fact not be necessary. –  Eugene Beresovsky Jan 7 at 7:02

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