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We encountered an issue with PostgreSQL 9.0.12 locking mechanism.

This is our minimal code to reproduce the issue:

Scenario

Transaction 1      Transaction 2
BEGIN              BEGIN
......             select trees for update;                
update apples;      
--passes
update apples;    
-- stuck!      

reproduce code: If you want to try it in your PostgreSQL - here is a code you can copy/paste.

I have a following db schema:

CREATE TABLE trees (
    id       integer primary key
);

create table apples (
    id       integer primary key,
    tree_id  integer references trees(id)
);

insert into trees values(1);
insert into apples values(1,1);

open two psql shells:

on shell 1:

BEGIN;
    SELECT id FROM trees WHERE id = 1 FOR UPDATE;    

on shell 2:

BEGIN;
UPDATE apples SET id = id WHERE id = 1;
UPDATE apples SET id = id WHERE id = 1;

The second update of apples will stuck and it seems that the porcess of shell 2 is wating on the transaction of shell 1 to finish.

relname  |transactionid|procpid|mode              |substr                                    |       age      |procpid
-----------+-------------+-------+------------------+------------------------------------------+----------------+-------
           |             | 4911  | ExclusiveLock    | <IDLE> in transaction                    | 00:05:42.718051|4911
           |   190839904 | 4911  | ExclusiveLock    | <IDLE> in transaction                    | 00:05:42.718051|4911
trees      |             | 4911  | RowShareLock     | <IDLE> in transaction                    | 00:05:42.718051|4911
           |             | 5111  | ExclusiveLock    | UPDATE apples SET id = id WHERE id = 1;  | 00:05:21.67203 |5111
           |   190839905 | 5111  | ExclusiveLock    | UPDATE apples SET id = id WHERE id = 1;  | 00:05:21.67203 |5111
apples_pkey|             | 5111  | RowExclusiveLock | UPDATE apples SET id = id WHERE id = 1;  | 00:05:21.67203 |5111
apples     |             | 5111  | RowExclusiveLock | UPDATE apples SET id = id WHERE id = 1;  | 00:05:21.67203 |5111
trees      |             | 5111  | RowShareLock     | UPDATE apples SET id = id WHERE id = 1;  | 00:05:21.67203 |5111
trees      |             | 5111  | ShareLock        | UPDATE apples SET id = id WHERE id = 1;  | 00:05:21.67203 |5111
           |             | 2369  | ExclusiveLock    | <IDLE> in transaction                    | 00:00:00.199268|2369
           |             | 2369  | ExclusiveLock    | <IDLE> in transaction                    | 00:00:00.199268|2369
           |             | 5226  | ExclusiveLock    | select pg_class.relname,pg_locks.transac | 00:00:00       |5226

Have we misunderstood something or it is a bug in postgres?

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typos(in first snippet): s/apple/apples/g; s/tree/trees/g` ?? Also(final snippet): terminal1 <--> terminal2 ?? –  joop Mar 24 at 10:07
    
This is probably better sent to the Postgres mailing list. –  a_horse_with_no_name Mar 24 at 10:17
    
The first shell is done as soon as you do the COMMIT. The second shell tries to update a record which is in the process of being updated. –  Patrick Mar 24 at 11:14
2  
@ErwinBrandstetter: I could reproduce the behavior using 9.3.4 (although without committing the select from the first transaction) - the second transaction hangs on the second update, not the first update which is kind of weird –  a_horse_with_no_name Mar 24 at 11:30
2  
The : in UPDATE apples SET id = id WHERE id = 1: is just a typo then? –  Erwin Brandstetter Mar 24 at 11:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

There is no bug, and I don't think you're misunderstanding anything; you're just missing a couple of pieces of the puzzle.

Foreign keys are implemented internally using row-level locking; starting from Postgres 8.1 and up to 9.2, whenever you update the referencing table (apples in this case), a query is fired that does SELECT FOR SHARE on the referenced table (trees). So that SELECT FOR UPDATE in the first transaction blocks the SELECT FOR SHARE of the referential integrity for the second transaction. This is what causes the block in the second command.

Now I hear you yell, “Wait! How come it blocks on the second command and not the first? The explanation is simple, really -- that's just because there is a simple optimization that skips the internal SELECT FOR SHARE when the key is not being modified. However, this is simplistic in that if you update a tuple a second time, this optimization will not fire because it's harder to track down the original values. Hence the blockage.

You might also be wondering why I said this is up to 9.2 --- what's with 9.3? The main difference there is that in 9.3 it uses SELECT FOR KEY SHARE, which is a new, lighter lock level; it allows for better concurrency. If you try your example in 9.3 and also change the SELECT FOR UPDATE to SELECT FOR NO KEY UPDATE (which is a lighter mode than SELECT FOR UPDATE that says you are maybe going to update the tuple, but you promise to not modify the primary key and promise not to delete it), you should see it doesn't block. (Also, you can try an UPDATE on the referenced row and if you don't modify the primary key, then it will also not block.)

This 9.3 stuff was introduced by a patch by yours truly as http://git.postgresql.org/gitweb/?p=postgresql.git;a=commit;h=0ac5ad5134f2769ccbaefec73844f8504c4d6182 and I think it was a pretty cool hack (The commit message has some more details, if you care about that sort of stuff). But beware, do not use versions prior to 9.3.4 because that patch was so hugely complex that a few serious bugs went unnoticed and we only fixed recently.

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Thanks, We are having hard time to workaround it in our application. It leads us to deadlock. script to reproduce the deadlock: shell 1: BEGIN; SELECT id FROM trees WHERE id = 1 FOR UPDATE; --> then move to shell 2. UPDATE apples SET id = id WHERE id = 1; --> deadlock on shell 2: BEGIN; UPDATE apples SET id = id WHERE id = 1; UPDATE apples SET id = id WHERE id = 1; then return to shell 1 Any tips how to avoid this deadlock? –  Amir Baron Mar 24 at 14:42
1  
UPDATE set id=id doesn't seem very reasonable. Are you really updating the value of the primary key? If so, nothing can help you. And can you use FOR SHARE instead of FOR UPDATE in the first session? –  alvherre Mar 24 at 15:27

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