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I have a checkBox named as testCheck. When user check this the value becomes TRUE. I am able to implement the compare of the TRUE/FALSE with the following ways

1.

if (testCheck.getValue() == Boolean.TRUE) {

   // Respective Code

}

2.

if (testCheck.getValue().equals(Boolean.TRUE)) {

   //Respective Code
}

3.

if (testCheck.getValue()) {

   //Respective Code
 }

My questions:

  • Is there any difference ?
  • If yes, Which one is the best way of implementation ?
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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It depends....

if the return type of testCheck.getValue() is boolean, the 3rd one is ok.

But if it was Boolean (Big B), I would do:

Boolean.TRUE.equals(testCheck.getValue())

to avoid the NPE during autoboxing.

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The answers:

  • There's no difference for compiler: a good optimizer will generate the same code. But there's difference for human beings (developers, testers, supporters etc): it's readability.
  • The 3d option is far more natural and that's why easier to read.

So the expected code (least surprise principle) is

  if (testCheck.getValue()) {
    ...
    //Respective Code
  }
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I prefer 3rd option. It's elegant. Since the testCheck.getValue() evaluated to boolean, you can use it inside the if condition

In java, with == operator, we are checking two reference are referring same object in memory.

To check two object are meaningfully equal, use .equals() method.

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Is there any difference ?

There is only a difference in readability.

If yes, Which one is the best way of implementation ?

The last one is probably the way to go if you want your code to be read and understood fast.

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Is there any difference ?

Yes, there is.

If yes, Which one is the best way of implementation ?

3rd one.

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1  
If everyone answered like you, I don't think people would learn much on SO. Yes/No answers are not very helpful in the long run, if there is no why. –  Joffrey Mar 24 '14 at 10:31

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