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First, an idealized working example of doing almost what I want to do:

public final class One {
    private int i;

    public class InOne {
        public int foo() { return i; }
    }
}

public class Two {
    private final One aOne = new One();

    Object getInTwo() {
        return aOne.new InOne() {
            public int someMethod() { return foo() + 100; }
        };
    }
}

Fine, I can extend a non-static class in a non-baseclass, by qualifying new with an enclosing instance. But of course, as it stands this makes no sense, since someMethod becomes inaccessible in the returned object. In actuality, the return type of getInTwo is not supposed to be Object but SomeInterface, defined like this:

public interface SomeInterface {
    int someMethod();
}

As far as I know, there is no way to create an anonymous class that both extends a class and implements an interface not implemented by that class. So I'll have to do a non-anonymous class, something like this:

public class Two {
    private final One aOne = new One();

    Object getInTwo() {
        class InTwo extends One.InOne implements SomeInterface {
            public int someMethod() { return foo() + 100; }
        }
        return new InTwo();
    }
}

Now the compiler tells me that an enclosing instance that contains One.InOne is required, which makes sense, but I have the object that I want to be the enclosing instance, and in the anonymous class case I was able to specify that by aOne.new. But now that I can't use an anonymous class, I can't specify the enclosing instance, or can I?

Obviously there are ways around this by moving things around in the class hierarchy (e.g., encapsulating an InOne in the InTwo instead if extending), which look fine in this idealized toy example, but in the context I actually want to do this they get much messier, so what I am asking is actually what I would like to do. As far as I can see, there is nothing structural that prevents it, it's just a syntax problem.

share|improve this question
    
Should One be final class? –  Rohit Jain Mar 24 '14 at 13:26
    
Yes, that's an actual complication: it prevents me from extending InOne inside something that extends One. –  njlarsson Mar 24 '14 at 13:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This should work for you

public class Two {
   private final One aOne = new One();

   Object getInTwo() {
      class InTwo extends One.InOne implements SomeInterface {

            public InTwo(){
                aOne.super();
            }
            public int someMethod() { return foo() + 100; }
       }
       return new InTwo();
    }
}

Your problem is that the inner class of One.InOne can only exist within the context of an instance of One. Therefore, in the constructor, you must be able to provide an enclosing instance of any class than extends One.InOne.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the nice explanation missing in my answer. –  Balder Mar 24 '14 at 14:00

This is not very beautiful, and I wouldn't recommend it at all... anyway - here you go:

public class Two {
    private final One aOne = new One();

    Object getInTwo() {
        class InTwo extends One.InOne implements SomeInterface {
            public InTwo() {
                Two.this.aOne.super();
            }
            public int someMethod() { return foo() + 100; }
        }
        return new InTwo();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, well in my case the options are even less beautiful, and writing the super call without the Two.this. like @jacobhyphenated did also makes it a tiny bit less ugly. –  njlarsson Mar 24 '14 at 13:54
    
Yes, a tiny bit - I actually added Two.this. to make it a tiny bit more ugly. ;) –  Balder Mar 24 '14 at 14:00

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