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So I'm trying to familiarise myself with c++ pointers by running the following code.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main(void){
    int* x;
    cout << &x << endl;
    return 0;
 }

which works fine and prints the pointer value of x but

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main(void){
    int* x;
    *x = 100;
    cout << &x << endl;
    return 0;
 }

gives me a segmentation fault when I try to tun it. Why is this? I don't see how that extra line should change anything about the address of x.

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Of course it does... x is an uninitialized pointer. Writing to it is therefore undefined behavior. You have to initialize the pointer first, either by allocating memory like x = new int; or pointing it at an existing variable like x = &someExistingInt;. (Note that when you cout << &x you're printing the address of the pointer, i.e. the address of the local variable x, not the value of the pointer or the address it points to.) –  TypeIA Mar 24 '14 at 13:30
    
*x = 100; because you didn't initialize the pointer to point at a valid memory location where your value can be stored. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Mar 24 '14 at 13:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

and prints the pointer value of x but

Not exactly.

  • std::cout << &x; it prints x's address (the pointer's address);
  • std::cout << x; prints the address, x points to;
  • std::cout << *x; prints what x points to;

int* x;
*x = 100;

Here, x is just a pointer, you need to allocate memory for the 100. For example

int* x = new int;
*x = 100;
std::cout << *x;

Or just

int* x = new int( 100 );
std::cout << *x;

Without allocating memory and leaving x uninitialized, by *x = 100 you're trying to change some random memory, which leads to undefined behavior.

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You did not allocate an object which you are going to assign.

int* x;

The value of x is unspecified and can be any arbitrary value. So the next statement

*x = 100;

is invalid.

You have to write

x = new int;

*x = 100;

Or

x = new int( 100 );

Or even

x = new int { 100 };

provided that your compiler supports the list initialization for operator new which was introduced in the C++ 2011..

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You have undefined behaviour.

Your first example is fine since &x (which has type int**) is the address of a stack allocated pointer. One of the << overloads in cout is defined to output that correctly.

In the second example, you are dereferencing a pointer that is not pointing to anything. That's undefined behaviour; hence the crash. If you'd written

int y;
int* x;
x = &y;
*x = 100; /*this means that y is now 100*/

then all would have been well since now x is pointing to something.

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