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For a project not using ARC, assuming I have a property on my class:

@property (assign) CGPathRef pathRef;

And I have a method updating this Path reference at some point, for example:

UIBezierPath *bezierPath = [UIBezierPath bezierPathWithOvalInRect:rect];
self.pathRef = CGPathCreateCopy(bezierPath.CGPath);

In my dealloc, I am doing as follows:

- (void)dealloc
{
    CGPathRelease(self.pathRef);
    self.pathRef = nil;

    [super dealloc];
}

When running the static analyser I'm getting this Memory advice for the line where I am using CGPathRelease:

Incorrect decrement of the reference count of an object that is not owned at this point by the caller.

I thought I was onto something here https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/qa/qa1565/_index.html but it seems this is explaining how to hand off foundation objects to the Core Animation APIs.

Can anyone advise on this, how can I manage this Foundation object without static analyser warning?

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2 Answers 2

You don't own the return value of a property accessor. Use the instance variable instead.

CGPathRelease(_pathRef);

Alternatively (and preferably), you can implement the accessor methods yourself and include the memory management.

- (void)setPathRef:(CGPathRef)val
{
    if (_pathRef)
    {
        CGPathRelease(_pathRef);
        _pathRef = NULL;
    }
    if (val)
    {
         _pathRef = CGPathCreateCopy(val);
    }
}
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+1 Regarding your first solution, in addition to CGPathRelease(_pathRef) in dealloc, you would obviously also use the ivar for assignment, too, such a _pathRef = CGPathCreateCopy(bezierPath.CGPath);. That eliminates the other static analyzer warning. –  Rob Mar 24 at 15:29
1  
Regarding your custom setter solution, while that enjoys a certain elegance (a) you will get a warning with this setPathRef unless you define the property to be nonatomic; and (b) it's vaguely discomfiting to have an assign property that is actually engaging in retain-like behavior (though, you obviously cannot use retain with non-objects), so I'd advise a comment at the property declaration to make this clear. –  Rob Mar 24 at 15:30

The other obvious solution in this scenario is to just use the UIBezierPath object, which gets you out of the weeds of CGPathRef create/release logic and bypasses this static analyzer idiosyncrasy. Thus, define a property:

@property (nonatomic, retain) UIBezierPath *bezierPath;

And then, when you want to set it:

UIBezierPath *bezierPath = [UIBezierPath bezierPathWithOvalInRect:rect];
self.bezierPath = bezierPath;

And when you need the CGPath, just grab it from the UIBezierPath, e.g.:

CGContextAddPath(context, self.bezierPath.CGPath);

And then in dealloc, you can just release it:

- (void)dealloc
{
    [_bezierPath release];
    [super dealloc];
}

That way, you can enjoy the simplicity of the object memory semantics, can use some of the nice convenience methods of UIBezierPath, can use other techniques that aren't readily available for Core Foundation types (e.g. autorelease), but you still get the CGPath for it whenever you need it.

There are times you have to employ one of the techniques advised by Darren (+1), notably when there isn't some logical object corresponding to the Core Foundation type, but in this CGPathRef example, I generally use UIBezierPath object instead. Given that you're starting with a UIBezierPath object already, it's even more compelling.

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