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I'm trying to combine the functions of two different base classes into a new class, to no avail. Say I have class A and B, whereas B is a descendant of A with different functionality (i.e. can't be used as a substitute for A during runtime) and need a class C, which combines A and B, uses both and provides a unique interface to users of C. How can I achieve this? Multiple inheritance isn't possible with C#, interfaces don't seem to fit. So what can I do?

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Ah, and combination is also not possible. It must be an inheritance. – neil Feb 14 '10 at 14:18
    
"B is a descendant of A with different functionality (i.e. can't be used as a substitute for A during runtime)" - this sure sounds messy. Why are you doing this? – Jørn Schou-Rode Feb 14 '10 at 14:22
    
Can you give an example of what these classes would do? And why interfaces and combination won't work? – Ray Feb 14 '10 at 14:23
    
a concrete example might help. If B derives from A, instances of B can always be used as instances of A during runtime. You can downcast an instance of B to an instance of A. Also, can you explain further about C. You said C uses both A and B, and provides a unique interface. Why then, would you even consider multiple inheritance? Nothing in your description provides a reason for deriving C from anything. – Cheeso Feb 14 '10 at 14:23
    
multiple inheritance is possiblæe in c# but only from interface types (and yes interfaces are types in C# :) ), so if multiple inheritance would fit so should interfaces it's one and the same it's only a matter of where you put the implementation – Rune FS Feb 14 '10 at 15:13

Your design is broken.

B is a descendant of A with different functionality (i.e. can't be used as a substitute for A during runtime)

That situation is a mis-use of inheritance. If you want to do that, you should either use composition or a common interface that both A & B implement separately instead.

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2  
+1 for composition – Luhmann Feb 14 '10 at 14:24
    
Hmm. Thanks for the flowers. A and B are classes from an external type library, namely SecureBlackbox, especially classes TElSecureServer and TElDTLSServer. The latter inherits from the first. Whereas the first may be used to secure TCP connections, the latter is used for UDP. I have to support both in my app, and would be done fine, if I could roll my own class, a descendant of TElDTLSServer. Unfortunatley if I inherit from TElDTLSServer only, I cannot use my class to secure TCP anymore. It does simply not work and end up in an explicit error (for some reasons, I don't know). – neil Feb 14 '10 at 16:02
    
Composition does not work, because I need to associate external objects with the used base classes. The base class is able to reflect a reference to itself in some callbacks (need it). If I use combination, the reference points to the pure base class object and I'm loosing the context. So I have to inherit a new class from the base class, add my objects, in order to retrieve the context... Oh what a mess.... – neil Feb 14 '10 at 16:13
    
@neil In that case, it's not your design that's broken, it's someone else's. But that doesn't change that it's still a broken design. One way to adapt to fix it is build your own interface with the functions you need, and then build types that wrap your existing A & B using composition and also implement this new interface. – Joel Coehoorn Feb 14 '10 at 18:05
    
I have uploaded some explanations here maps.alphadex.de/eldos/explained.txt – neil Feb 14 '10 at 22:48

Consider explicit interface implementation:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173157.aspx

public interface IFriendly
{
  void Greet();
}

public interface IEnemy
{
  void Greet();
}

public class SomeGuy : IFriendly, IEnemy
{
  //default Greeting
  public void Greet()
  {
    //...
  }

  //greeting when using an IFriendly reference
  void IFriendly.Greet()
  {
    //,,
  }

  //greeting when using an IEnemy reference
  void IEnemy.Greet()
  {
    //,,
  }
}
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+0.5 ... the other 0.5 you'll get when you remove the public keyword from the explicit interface method implementation signatures :-> – herzmeister Feb 14 '10 at 14:33

You say that B descends from A but is different and cannot be used as an A; this defies the purpose of inheritance altogether. What are you trying to achieve? Regardless, it sounds as though you should be using composition, not inheritance. If C does not expose the interface defined by A or B, then it should not inherit from either.

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Its not me, providing A and B. External typ lib. I was in the hope, I could use B and return it to A function with a setting, but this isnt the case. B does not work for TCP connections (see above). – neil Feb 14 '10 at 16:16

The fact that you need to consider such an action makes me think that you might need to consider refactoring your class structure.

But, to solve your immediate problem why not instantiate the two classes (ignore the fact that they are in an inheritance relationship) and call the methods in the sequence you need? Think of C as a facade pattern for A and B.

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Two classes would help, but because the interfacing is nearly identical, I would have to branch too much (in other words: I have to care about, what type of underlaying object I'm facing, whereas I don't want to care at all) – neil Feb 14 '10 at 16:10
    
For those of you demanding concrete information: I have put some detailed information here: maps.alphadex.de/eldos/explained.txt Pointers welcome. – neil Feb 14 '10 at 17:02

Problem solved. Using System.Reflection now.

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