Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to execute extra lines of code during debugging in Visual Studio 2012. Is it possible to make it. One application would be to execute some WRITE(,) statements, or evaluate some expressions.

share|improve this question
    
Thanks for the explanation. But I think I did not make myself clear. What I was actually looking for is something similar to the "p" command in GDB. That is you could print to screen and see whatever you want when debugging.(The Visual Studio Watch Window) is designed to work this way, but for Fortran, the debugger doesn't work very nicely. I cannot see all the attributes of an object when the data structure is "deep". –  user2008151314 Mar 25 at 17:50
    
And some other features in GDB like "up" and "down" which could be used to access memory temporarily out of scope, I will be excited to know similar features in Visual Studio. –  user2008151314 Mar 25 at 17:53
add comment

2 Answers 2

You can use the #if to do this within Visual Studio.

#if DEBUG
    Console.WriteLine("Debug version");
#endif

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/4y6tbswk(v=vs.110).aspx

share|improve this answer
1  
This is not a valid Fortran code –  Peter Mar 24 at 17:35
    
Thanks. But is there a way that I could print those lines during debugging mode, and the code doesn't need to recompile in order to run extra lines of code? I added some more comments to the question to make myself clearer. I appreciate your response! –  user2008151314 Mar 25 at 17:54
add comment

If you're using F77 with the Intel Compiler, have a look at the /D-lines option. You can write code like

      if (x.gt.10) then
          x = 0
D         print *, 'x reset'
      end if

It will only compile the lines with D in column 1 if the /D-lines option is present, otherwise it is treated as a comment. I've only ever used this on F77. I don't know if it works on F90 etc.

Reference http://software.intel.com/sites/products/documentation/doclib/stdxe/2013/composerxe/compiler/fortran-lin/GUID-E356B0E3-F847-40A9-A932-77B4D8EEF53B.htm

The Intel compiler also supports preprocessing. You could use either

If you're using Silverfrost, have a look at the CIF-CELSE-CENDIF /VPARAM /SPARAM options.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I started with Fortran 95... So basically knew little about legacy F77. But thanks for the info! –  user2008151314 Mar 25 at 17:56
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.