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I know that FreePascal apps for Linux are statically linked. I imagine that there are some low-level APIs required. Is this just GTK for GUI applications? I assume a command-line app wouldn't have the same dependencies.

Where can I find a way to determine which LCL classes require which underlying APIs?

Edit: Vitaly wanted to know what I found with his answer.

With a small console app: ldd confirmed that it was a statically linked executable.
strace was more interesting. A console-only application showed no open files. I guess it's totally self contained.

With a simple GUI application, ldd showed some dynamic linking, and strace's output showed many "open"s.

It'll still take a little more research before I'm comfortable with this.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since they are statically linked, exactly what kind of dependencies could they have?..

However you can try to work it out with a several methods...

  1. ldd <executable> (just to be sure that your binary is not dynamically linked)
  2. strace <executable> > log.file 2&>1 && cat log.file | grep open

Where can I find a way to determine which LCL classes require which underlying APIs?

From my point of view, this purpose requires some hard work. I'd advice to try systemtap for the one.

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I'd played with ldd, but was unaware of strace. I'm new to Linux development. Thanks! – David Crowell Mar 25 '14 at 2:00
    
@David Crowell, please write a few words if you will manage to find the dependencies, it's interesting – Vitaly Isaev Mar 25 '14 at 6:43

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