Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am building a registration form and I need a way of preventing users from submitting less than 5 numbers for the zip code. When I comment out my attempt for the else if entirely, the other function (making sure that users won't submit any letters) works. I am using return false at the end so that the form won't submit and I can test for bad input. Sorry for the lack of jsfiddle - it wouldn't let me submit forms for some reason (I am a noob, so that may be the reason). Here's a snippet of my code:

HTML:

<form name="reg" onSubmit="return formValidation();">    
<p>Zip Code: <input type="text" id="zip" maxlength="5" name="zip"></p>
<input type="submit" id="submitbutton" name="submitbutton" value="Submit" />
<div id="msg"></div> 
</form>

JS:

function formValidation()  
{  
    var zip = document.reg.zip; 
    allnumeric(zip);

function allnumeric(zip)
{   
    var numbers = /^[0-9]+$/;  
    if(zip.value.match(numbers))  
    {  
        document.getElementById("msg").innerHTML=("OK &#x2713;");
        msg.style.color="green";
    }  
    else if (zip.numbers < 5) /*DOES NOT COMPUTE*/
    {
        msg.innerHTML=("Has to be 5 numbers.");
        msg.style.color="red";
    }
    else
    {  
        msg.innerHTML=("Numbers only please.");
        msg.style.color="red";
    }  
};  
    return false;
};
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You want zip.value.length, not zip.numbers.

You can also do the whole thing with the regex:

var numbers = /^\d{5}$/;  
if(zip.value.match(numbers))  
{  
    document.getElementById("msg").innerHTML=("OK &#x2713;");
    msg.style.color="green";
}  
else
{  
    msg.innerHTML=("Numbers only please.");
    msg.style.color="red";
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Nice solution. I really need to read up on regex. Right now it's pure sorcery to me. –  user3361043 Mar 24 at 21:04

I'd suggest embracing HTML5

<form name="reg" onSubmit="return formValidation();">
    <p>Zip Code:
        <input type="text" id="zip" pattern="\d{5}" maxlength="5" name="zip" required="required" />
    </p>
    <input type="submit" id="submitbutton" name="submitbutton" value="Submit" />
    <div id="msg"></div>
</form>

FIDDLE

share|improve this answer

I think the other answers cover the essence of your JS question but not really the Data Quality aspect as I don't think you really should be validating a zip in this way.

You're certainly taking the correct approach by trying to ensure the quality of the user input - but just checking for 5 numbers might not be enough.

There of tens of thousands of addresses where a 4 or 3 digit zip code should be considered valid input - where the Zip starts with one or two 0's. Some examples include:

  • Bridgeton, NJ 08302
  • Holtsville, NY 00544
  • Adjuntas, PR 00601 (All zip codes in Puerto Rico start with 00)
  • Christiansted, VI 00821

Users frequently omit the leading 00 / 0 and that should really be allowed in your form - they may find it an unpleasant distraction from your workflow if users are getting the handy inline validation message telling them they are incorrect when they know they are not.

The second possible flaw (again depending upon your workflow) is that people may enter the zip+4 too. You probably don't want to limit them to just the 5 when you may be able to get the full 9.

This means that your JS test would have to be updated to allow for the combinations, but would lead to a more robust final product. At a minimum, I'd suggest that as part of your form you include example zip codes (placeholder text or similar) which include the '00' case so users know what is expected. To allow for the optional +4 to be entered, update your regex to:

var numbers = ^\d{5}(-\d{4})?$;  
if(zip.value.match(numbers))  
{
    ....
}
else
{
    ...
}

And finally the ultimate way to ensure that you are catching the correct zip code and that they are correctly associated with an address is to validate the whole thing (regardless of the length of the zip). These validation services which you either make and maintain yourself or use a third party (such my company - http://www.qas.com/products/on-demand-address-validation.htm) can speed the capture of an address and ensure it is valid - coping with 3, 4 or 5 digit zips, enhancing the address with missing +4, correcting typos in the zip or other address elements.

Hope that helps and good luck!

Al.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.