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I am new to grunt and npm. So I am trying some "cookbook-example" on the site 'http://tech.pro/tutorial/1190/package-managers-an-introductory-guide-for-the-uninitiated-front-end-developer#front_end_developers'. You should not have to look there now, but I thought it could be good to share the site. So far so good, til it comes to the global installing. (Ok, some errors I had to figure out, but now I have working npm).

When it comes to the point trying to install something globally I get stuck.

What I did so far for testing globally installing some package:

  1. Created test-dicretory "grunttest"

  2. Inside that directory

    npm install -g jshint

    output I can see

npm http GET https://registry.npmjs.org/jshint
npm http 304 https://registry.npmjs.org/jshint
...
npm http 304 https://registry.npmjs.org/string_decoder
C:\Program Files\nodejs\node_modules\npm\jshint -> C:\Program Files\nodejs\node_modules\npm\node_modules\jshinnt
jshint@2.4.4 C:\Program Files\nodejs\node_modules\npm\node_modules\jshint
├── console-browserify@0.1.6
├── exit@0.1.2
├── underscore@1.4.4
├── shelljs@0.1.4
├── minimatch@0.2.14 (sigmund@1.0.0, lru-cache@2.5.0)
├── cli@0.4.5 (glob@3.2.9)
└── htmlparser2@3.3.0 (domelementtype@1.1.1, domutils@1.1.6, domhandler@2.1.0, readable-stream@1.0.26-2)

I just realize the 304, which should be ok, due to just says the ressource was not modified since last installation (few minutes before).

Checking if the jshint exists with:

  1. npm -global list

    output

npm@1.4.3 C:\Program Files\nodejs\node_modules\npm ├── abbrev@1.0.4 ├── ansi@0.2.1 ├─... ├── ├── graceful-fs@2.0.2 ├── inherits@2.0.1 ├── ini@1.1.0 ├─┬ init-package-json@0.0.14 │ └── promzard@0.2.1 ├─┬ jshint@2.4.4 extraneous │ ├─┬ cli@0.4.5 │ │ └─┬ glob@3.2.9 │ │ └── inherits@2.0.1 │ ├── console-browserify@0.1.6 │ ├── exit@0.1.2 │ ├─┬ htmlparser2@3.3.0 │ │ ├── domelementtype@1.1.1 │ │ ├── domhandler@2.1.0 │ │ ├── domutils@1.1.6 │ │ └─┬ readable-stream@1.0.26-2 │ │ └─... ├── text-table@0.2.0 ├── uid-number@0.0.3 └── which@1.0.5

npm ERR! extraneous: jshint@2.4.4 C:\Program Files\nodejs\node_modules\npm\node_modules\jshint npm

Questions:

  1. Why do I get npm ERR! extraneous ...?
  2. What does it mean?
  3. How can I resolve this issue?

Information

I am on a windows-machine Windows 7, using cygwin as shell. trying to just the jshint (jshint someTestfile.js) of course does not work.

Thanks in advance, Meru

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1 Answer 1

up vote 23 down vote accepted

npm ERR! extraneous means a package is installed but is not listed in your project's package.json.

Since you're listing packages that have been installed globally, it's going to give you a lot of extraneous errors that can be simply ignored because most things installed globally will not be in your project's package.json.

share|improve this answer
    
hi! Thanks for the answer. Does this mean also, that I acutally should be able to execute the "jshint", correct? –  Meru Mar 25 '14 at 21:26
    
Correct. Running jshint myfile.js should run jshint on myfile.js. –  Kyle Robinson Young Mar 26 '14 at 4:07
    
I just realized that I did not write the question exact enough, what I meant was: executing the jshint via the gruntfile. Therewith, if I execute the gruntfile via "grunt" and have the jshint included in grunt.js and package.json, then this validation also is executed. Correct? (Whereas your answer is also a very good hint for me.) –  Meru Mar 28 '14 at 6:52
    
Ah I see. With Grunt, everything goes through tasks. You would load and configure the grunt-contrib-jshint task in your Gruntfile.js. The only thing you install globally is npm i grunt-cli -g which gives you access to run the grunt command to run a Gruntfile.js. See this guide for more info: gruntjs.com/getting-started –  Kyle Robinson Young Mar 28 '14 at 17:38

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