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I've got a problem which can be simplified to this:

parameters: a, b

if (a > 5)
{
    Print("Very well, a > 5");

    if (b > 7)
        Print("Even better, b > 7");
    else
    {
        Print("I don't like your variables");
    }
}
else
{
    Print("I don't like your variables");
}

I would like to use only one else instead of two since they are the same code. What I thought of was creating an additional method, which will return combined true`false`, but this is a serious overkill.

Another option would be a goto, but this would make code less readable and unsafe.

What is the way to do it, avoiding checking the same condition many times and making it as readable as possible?

share|improve this question
3  
There's no "magic" way of doing this. You're going to have to choose one of those "overkill" options: create a method, declare a flag, encapsulate it in a lambda/anonymouse method, etc. –  Kirk Woll Mar 24 '14 at 23:02
    
I've long wanted a language feature (in some language) that would help with this, even before Java was invented. So far nobody has ever accomplished this, though. I usually use a boolean. –  ajb Mar 24 '14 at 23:04
1  
@ajb: How would you differentiate that feature from actually just wanting to do one else at the outer loop? Which if inside the code which else part you want to be unified? What if I use switch statement inside? Will it work if the inner ifs are refactored to another function? What happen if an exception is raised? If you need to mark each if with special marker to indicate that you want the else part of this if to be taken care outside, then that would be the same as setting a flag. –  justhalf Mar 25 '14 at 4:35
4  
You can either obfuscate your code and jump through hoops to avoid goto because some college professor told you once that it was bad, or you can express what you intend using the well defined features of the language. One way is substantially more harmful to readability than the other. Dogma has little place in pragmatic programming. –  James Greenhalgh Mar 25 '14 at 8:20
    
Have a look at use of Ternary operator –  KisHan SarsecHa Gajjar Mar 25 '14 at 8:57

16 Answers 16

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Boolean logic 101:

public void test(int a, int b, int c) {
    boolean good = true;
    if (good = good && a > 5) {
        System.out.println("Very well, a > 5");
    }
    if (good = good && b > 7) {
        System.out.println("Even better, b > 7");
    }
    if (good = good && c > 13) {
        System.out.println("Even better, c > 13");
    }
    // Duplicare possint in infinitum
    if (!good) {
        System.out.println("I don't like your variables");
    }
}

Alternatively - if you want loads of checks -

enum Tests {
    A_gt_5 {
        @Override
        boolean test(int a, int b, int c) {
            return a > 5;
        }
    },
    B_gt_7 {
        @Override
        boolean test(int a, int b, int c) {
            return b > 7;
        }
    },
    C_gt_13 {
        @Override
        boolean test(int a, int b, int c) {
            return c > 13;
        }
    };

    abstract boolean test (int a, int b, int c);
}

public void test(int a, int b, int c) {
    boolean good = true;
    for ( Tests t : Tests.values() ) {
        good = good && t.test(a, b, c);
        if (!good) {
            break;
        }
    }
    if (!good) {
        System.out.println("I don't like your variables");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
// Duplicare possint in infinitum you mean and so on? –  Michał Mar 25 '14 at 0:02
2  
Isn't writing // Duplicate indefinitely more clear? :) –  Michał Mar 25 '14 at 0:09
1  
@Michał - yes - but not so much fun. I considered add hock (which is a joke referring to ad hoc) and etc. and ad infinitum but eventually decided to make you think. :) –  OldCurmudgeon Mar 25 '14 at 0:11
1  
The best answer of all. The most readable hands down, and raises no performance questions. +1. Talking about the first block of code though (the small and readable one). The second is the Java Enterprise version, and I think it is not that relevant, because IMO the author is asking in a more conceptual way, the question is even tagged with multiple languages. –  NothingsImpossible Mar 25 '14 at 3:34
1  
This is incorrect as it does not mirror the functionality of the original example. In the case where a>5 and b<=7, the behavior of original is to print "Very well, a > 5", then print "I don't like your variables". –  KevinZ Apr 21 '14 at 5:03
void doILikeYourVariables(int a, int b) {
  if (a > 5) {
    Print("Very well, a > 5");
    if (b > 7) {
      Print("Even better, b > 7");
      return;
    }
  }
  Print("I don't like your variables");
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This is an option, but still return somewhere inside is pretty much equivalent to goto. It just translates it into return language –  Michał Mar 24 '14 at 23:13
14  
@Michał mutliple return statements is much easier to read than goto And it is pretty safe if you are in the habit of using RAII. –  Chris Drew Mar 24 '14 at 23:23
1  
You are right, I haven't considered goto safety. And readability - I don't mind a goto sometimes, but still it is considered a bad habit. Thanks :) –  Michał Mar 24 '14 at 23:25
1  
In your code if a > 5 but b <= 7 it will dislike my variables, which is not what the author of the question wanted in his example –  NothingsImpossible Mar 25 '14 at 3:28
4  
@NothingsImpossible: As you post your misunderstanding in multiple answer, I'll explain in each of your comment. In OP's code, having a>5 and b<=7 will result in "I don't like your variables" after "Very well, a > 5" –  justhalf Mar 25 '14 at 4:31
if (a > 5)
{
    Print("Very well, a > 5");
}
if(a > 5 && b >7)
{
    Print("Even better, b > 7");
}
else
{
    Print("I don't like your variables");
}

or

bool isEvenBetter = false;
if (a > 5)
{
    Print("Very well, a > 5");
    isEvenBetter = b > 7;
}
if(isEvenBetter)
{
    Print("Even better, b > 7");
}
else
{
    Print("I don't like your variables");
}
share|improve this answer
2  
But we still do the a > 5 twice. When I use more complicated ifs, it gets unefficient –  Michał Mar 24 '14 at 23:36
    
Check my edit please. –  Mert Mar 24 '14 at 23:39
    
isEvenBetter is not in the scope, this won't compile –  Michał Mar 24 '14 at 23:40

Actually for your case, there is only one instance where you "like" the variables, which is when a>5 and b>7. In that case, you just need to set a flag in the innermost if. Like this:

parameters: a, b

boolean good = false;
if (a > 5){
    Print("Very well, a > 5");
    if (b > 7){
        Print("Even better, b > 7");
        good = true;
    }
}
if(!good){
    Print("I don't like your variables");
}

Which is only additional one line (and one variable) while removing the multiple else (actually there is even no else!)


Side note

I would say that using goto (or anything that looks like it that is supported) in this case is acceptable.

I agree that "unconstrained use of goto" is bad, since it confuses the program flow, but on some situations, it's best to use goto, like the case you describe.

See this question: GOTO still considered harmful?

Actually, if you think about it, raising a (probably custom) exception is the same as goto, because it would make the program flow jump to a certain point (which is the catch or except).

What is the best reason not to use goto? It is because there might be multiple ways to enter a line of code. That's the same reason why multiple returns is not recommended by some people. But in your case, we indeed want to exit at multiple points, and hence that feature is required.

A constrained goto (such as exception handling in Java, which can only do "goto" to a "catch" line) is good.

I'm not saying that you should use goto, but I'm addressing the point where you say "goto is bad", and at the same time contributing to the pool of answers.

share|improve this answer

You might alter a state:

bool good = a > 5;
if(good)
{
    Print("Very well, a > 5");
    good = b > 7;
    if(good) {
        Print("Even better, b > 7");
    }
}
if( ! good) {
    Print("I don't like your variables");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I haven't thought about a flag! –  Michał Mar 24 '14 at 23:17
    
introduce a variable which is used in multiple places, not good coding style IMHO. –  billz Mar 24 '14 at 23:20
    
@DieterLücking true i saw bad, edit it i'll remove downvote –  nachokk Mar 24 '14 at 23:27
1  
I think setting good only once is more readable, I made an edit to show that. However this one is correct too –  Michał Mar 24 '14 at 23:32

How about using a do with breaks. This is actually a sneaky way of doing a goto though you can think of it as a filter composed of several if statements in which the default is the last bit if none of the if statements are hit.

parameters: a, b

do {
  if (a > 5)
  {
    Print("Very well, a > 5");

    if (b > 7)
    {
        Print("Even better, b > 7");
        break;
    }
  }

  Print("I don't like your variables");
} while (false);

EDIT - On repurposing language

A number of people have objected to this specialized use of a do while to solve a particular problem. The main objection seems to be that it appears to be a loop but isn't really a loop so this construct falls into a kind of uncanny valley of loop use. In other words, "It just ain't natural."

And I agree that it is an uncommon usage and there really should be comments to identify that this is a filter using a do while to create a block allowing the use of break statements whenever a decision tree branch end point is reached. That is really what this is, a hard coded forward traversal decision tree without backtracking made up of a series of decisions. At any point in the decision process we can break out with a decision or fall through with a default decision including indicating no decision at all.

One could say that any source that requires comments to be understandable is not good code. On the other hand, the reason almost all programming languages have some way of inserting comments is because annotating source code is extremely helpful when you come back six months later to make a change.

The nice thing about this approach is that it creates a local scope so that variables required during the decision process can be constructed and destructed properly.

In some ways it is somewhat like a lambda, to which I doubt anyone would object and it can be used in languages that do not support a lambda. In another way it is some what similar to a try catch.

Perusing the web one can find quite a few articles in which someone uses a programming language in a way different from it's original design intent such as this article on using C++ in a functional programming style or this online book on using object oriented practices with the C programming language.

All programmers have certain styles or language use habits. One good thing that can come from source code reviews and reading the source code of others is learning about a different way of using a programming language.

This is not tricky code like one would find as an entry to the Obfuscated C Programming contest. It is quite straightforward.

Edit: Better than a goto?

One question about this unusual use of a do while is, "Why not just use a goto?" Reading Dijkstra's essay of Go To Statement Considered Harmful, as well as this blog discussion on the essay and the goto statement, we can see there are several nice characteristics about using a loop with break statements which are not characteristics of a goto and its associated label.

The main characteristic, especially with this example is the one way flow in which there is a definite beginning and a definite end. There is no danger of inadvertently changing the program flow by moving the goto label. There is no danger of somewhere else in the function using the goto label as an opportune place to jump creating a dependency that was not originally intended. Reading the code, every programmer knows that where there is a break, you are leaving the loop and that on leaving the loop, you go to the source line after the loop close. The result is that you have a nice clean knowledge chunk, something that can be labeled as "figure out the text to print"

share|improve this answer
    
This is pretty sneaky - I don't need to make any additional method or lambda or whatever to achieve my goal. +1 –  Michał Mar 25 '14 at 0:10
    
in your code , if a > 5 but b <= 7, it will dislike my variables, which the example code in the question doesn't do - so this is not quite right yet –  NothingsImpossible Mar 25 '14 at 3:32
1  
@NothingsImpossible: As you post your misunderstanding in multiple answer, I'll explain in each of your comment. In OP's code, having a>5 and b<=7 will result in "I don't like your variables" after "Very well, a > 5" –  justhalf Mar 25 '14 at 4:32
    
@justhalf Wait a sec while I bury my head in the ground, brb –  NothingsImpossible Mar 25 '14 at 10:16
    
Don't do confusing constructs like loops not actually being loops. Just use goto instead. –  rightfold Mar 25 '14 at 10:38

Just for fun!

class VariableLiker {
  private:
    bool isGood_;
  public:
    VariableLiker() : isGood_(false) {}
    void checkA(int a) {
      if (a > 5) {
        Print("Very well, a > 5");
        isGood_ = true;
      }
    }
    void checkB(int b){
      if (isGood_ && b > 7)
        Print("Even better, b > 7");
      else
        Print("I don't like your variables");
    }
};

//...

VariableLiker variableLiker;
variableLiker.checkA(a);
variableLiker.checkB(b);
share|improve this answer
1  
Bad API. Your API suggests that you can also reverse the order of calling the checks, but in reality you can't. –  André Mar 25 '14 at 8:53
    
@André, Agreed, clearly a class is a bit overkill for this and it needs expanding to be more robust. I was just pointing out that if you have to maintain state, it might make sense to encapsulate the state in a class and have methods on the class that use that state. Probably not in this case but I thought it was worth noting. –  Chris Drew Mar 25 '14 at 9:01

Looking at all the answers, I would write it this way, and keep both elses. It makes no sense to complicate it.

parameters: a, b

if (a > 5)
{
    Print("Very well, a > 5");

    if (b > 7)
        Print("Even better, b > 7");
    else
        DontLikeIt();
}
else
{
    DontLikeIt();
}

And have a method, DontLikeIt(), that prints the response you want.

share|improve this answer
    
Are you kidding !!!! Two else are not removed and another method also added !!! Read the question again dude. :p :p and FYI, I am not the downvoter. –  KisHan SarsecHa Gajjar Mar 25 '14 at 14:01
    
No, I'm not kidding. I argue for keeping both elses due to readability, and introduce an extra method to minimize code duplication. My conclusion is that the OP has a larger code-base than this small sample. –  cederlof Mar 27 '14 at 9:04

The interesting aspect of your code is that even if it likes a, it "doesn't like your variables" if b is then not good enough.

Obviously you're not actually concerned about having two else statements in the code; it's the duplication of the "don't like" code that you seek to avoid. The following will do the trick and is useful if you don't mind throwing away the value of b.

if (a > 5)
    Print("Very well, a > 5");
else
    b = 0;

if (b > 7)
    Print("Even better, b > 7");
else
    Print("I don't like your variables");

If you need to retain the value of b then then you can use an additional variable.

var evenBetter = (b > 7);
if (a > 5)
    Print("Very well, a > 5");
else
    evenBetter = false;

if (evenBetter)
    Print("Even better, b > 7");
else
    Print("I don't like your variables");

Here's a version which doesn't precalculate b's goodness until required. This is better when the test is expensive or if it could produce side effects. It also does away with an else, if that really is important. ;-)

var evenBetter = false;
if (a > 5)
{
    Print("Very well, a > 5");
    evenBetter = (b > 7);
}

if (evenBetter)
    Print("Even better, b > 7");
else
    Print("I don't like your variables");

The downside of this "splitting out" method is that a sloppy reader may assume that the second if statement has nothing to do with a and thus fail to note the unusual case that "don't like your variables" occurs when a is good but b is not.

share|improve this answer

Another way without break or goto is:

int c = (new[] { a > 5 ,a > 5 && b > 7 }).Count(x=>x);
if (c > 0)
{
    Print("Very well, a > 5 ");
}
if (c > 1)
{
    Print("Even better, b > 7");
}
else
{
    Print("I don't like your variables");
}
share|improve this answer

Have you tried something like

string badResponse = "I don't like your variables";
string goodReponse = "Very well, a > 5";
string betterReponse = "Even better b > 7";

(a > 5) ? ((b>7) ? Print(betterReponse) : Print(goodReponse)) : Print(badResponse);
share|improve this answer
    
If a=6 and b=6 this prints "Very well, a > 5" but OPs code prints "Very well, a > 5", "I don't like your variables". If a=6 and b=8 this prints "Even better b > 7" but OPs code prints "Very well, a > 5", "Even better b > 7" –  Chris Drew Mar 25 '14 at 11:59

if ((a < 5)||(b < 7)) print ("I don't like your variables.");

Invert the logic, and patch it together. What you're doing is an "and"; so check for invalid cases first and proceed with additional checks below it. This also follows the DRY principle.

share|improve this answer
 if (a > 5 && b > 7)
    {
        Print("Very well, a > 5");
        Print("Even better, b > 7");
    }
    else
    {
        if (a > 5)
        {
            Print("Very well, a > 5");
        }
        Print("I don't like your variables");

    }
share|improve this answer
    
OK, you have removed one else and one Print("I don't like your variables") but gained an extra Print("Very well, a > 5") and if (a > 5) check. –  Chris Drew Mar 25 '14 at 14:08
    
@ChrisDrew: And also against your solution, this code has no return! –  Meysam Hit Mar 25 '14 at 15:05
string msgFirstPart, msgSecondPart = "I don't like your variables";
if (a > 5) {
  msgFirstPart = "Very well, a > 5\n";
  if (b > 7)
    msgSecondPart = "Even better, b > 7";
}
Print(msgFirstPart + msgSecondPart);
share|improve this answer
    
Is this special case or you always prefer to provide more fun and even more. ;) –  KisHan SarsecHa Gajjar Mar 25 '14 at 12:49
1  
@KishanSarsechaGajjar Special case. Honestly I don't always answer the same question three times! :) I just like the question and had three unique answers and wanted to see what people think. –  Chris Drew Mar 25 '14 at 13:17

Well, you can do with with 0 else and 0 if, if you are using C++:

switch ( ( a > 5 ) + ( ( b > 7 ) << 1 ) )
{
case 1:
    printf ( "Very well, a > 5" );
case 0:
case 2:
    printf ( "I don't like your variables" );
    break;
case 3:
    printf ( "Very well, a > 5" );
    printf ( "Even better, b > 7" );
    break;
}

C# version has some stealth if statements in the form of ternary operators: (use System.out.print for Java)

switch ( ( a > 5 ? 1 : 0 ) + ( b > 7 ? 2 : 0 ) )
{
case 1:
    Console.WriteLine ( "Very well, a > 5" );
    Console.WriteLine ( "I don't like your variables" );
    break;
case 0:
case 2:
    Console.WriteLine ( "I don't like your variables" );
    break;
case 3:
    Console.WriteLine ( "Very well, a > 5" );
    Console.WriteLine ( "Even better, b > 7" );
    break;
}
share|improve this answer

use ? : operator, else will not be required. So that same code will be eliminated and also there will not be another method or goto in picture.

Note : However this will not print exact result if a > 5 and b < 7. Extra "I don't like your variables" will not be printed in that case.

Example :

string result = "I don't like your variables";

if (a > 5)
{
    result = (b > 7) ? "Even better, b > 7" : "Very well, a > 5";
}

Print(result);
share|improve this answer
    
For a=6, b=6 and a=6, b=8 this does not print the same output as OPs code. I expect there is a clever way that uses the ternary operator though. –  Chris Drew Mar 25 '14 at 8:18
    
This is a way to eliminate else and OP wants to eliminate the same code...so both issues are solved in this answer...and OP also don't want to create another method...!!! I am wondering that you properly read question or not... –  KisHan SarsecHa Gajjar Mar 25 '14 at 8:52
    
if a=6, b=6 then your code outputs "Very well, a > 5" but OPs code outputs "Very well, a > 5", "I don't like your variables". If a=6, b=8 your code outputs "Even better, b > 7" but OPs code outputs "Very well, a > 5", "Even better, b > 7". –  Chris Drew Mar 25 '14 at 8:56
    
Ans updated for 2nd case, and I am suggesting just an alternative for eliminating else. –  KisHan SarsecHa Gajjar Mar 25 '14 at 9:06
    
OP's post have two Prints in the first case. Your answer only prints once. –  cederlof Mar 25 '14 at 13:53

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