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When a user wants to do a password reset, an email is sent with an unique URL so he can reset it. Like this: website.com/forgot.php?email'.$email.'&hash='.$thehash

$thehash is a unique hash for every user stored in the database.

The problem is that $thehash is stored in the database just the way it´s used in the URL. That´s just as stupid as storing the passwords in plain text. If someone get´s access to the database it doesn't matter that I have my passwords stored with sha512 and a secure salt, the attacker can just get access to all account using the values (email and hash) all found in the database and change passwords for users.

When I hashed user passwords the user had one part of information that could not be found in the database, the plaintext password so it worked out. But now, I have no idea what to do since I have nothing unique not found in the database. So what is a good way solve this? How do I securely store hashes?

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Generate a one-time use random key. – Paul Dessert Mar 24 '14 at 23:35
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I see.. So when the user request an email it creates a key that expires in a short period of time. That´s pretty nice, but if the attacker has access to the database he can still get all those keys and reset the passwords.. – user3297181 Mar 24 '14 at 23:42
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If someone has access to your database, you're probably already screwed. The point of hashing is to make it hard/impossible for someone to get the real passwords – Paul Dessert Mar 24 '14 at 23:49
    
"...The problem is that $thehash is stored in the database just the way it´s used in the URL..." - I believe you should be using a POST rather than a GET to keep the security parameters out of the URL. See stackoverflow.com/questions/13643888/…. – jww Mar 25 '14 at 2:59
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem isn't with how you're storing hashes, it's with how the reset link works.

You don't want to use the hash to authenticate a user for password resets, for the reasons you mentioned.

Use a perishable token instead. Whenever a user requests a password reset, generate a token (256-bit should be enough) and store its hash in your database, along with the user who requested it, and the token creation datetime. Put that token in the reset link (instead of the email+hash). When the user clicks the link, your server will receive the token, find the corresponding user and it'll be safe to change the password.

By only storing the token's hash in your database, but using the unhashed token in the email link, you're making sure that even if the attacker still has access to your database, he won't be able to forge his own reset links.

By comparing the time when the user clicked the link with the datetime stored when the token was generated, you'll be able to control how long the reset link is valid (and avoid situations where a user forgets to delete the email, gets his email account compromised, and have the attacker use the reset link).

Check this Authlogic Password Reset Tutorial for a full implementation.

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Don't forget to use random salt to make the hash harder to crack. – jariq Mar 25 '14 at 8:03
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@jariq A hash of a random value already has plenty of entropy - adding a salt gains you nothing. – Nick Johnson Mar 25 '14 at 10:38
    
@NickJohnson It is mentioned in the 4th paragraph of the answer: "By only storing the token's hash in your database, but using the unhashed token in the email link..." This clearly indicates that the token is vulnerable to attacks with rainbow tables. – jariq Mar 25 '14 at 13:12
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@jariq Brute force attacks and rainbow tables are not an issue if the token is random and large enough (say, 256 bits). Passwords are a different beast because they are non-random, restricted to ASCII, and much shorter. – ntoskrnl Mar 25 '14 at 18:07
    
@ntoskrnl IMO it does not matter how large or how random is the token. Without the salt attacker just needs to provide any data that produce the same hash value - I know that probability of finding such data is very small but also the effort to implement salting is very small and the risk can be mitigated. – jariq Mar 25 '14 at 18:28

When a user wants to do a password reset...

I will refer you to the OWASP Forgot Password Cheat Sheet, which in essence states:

1 Gather Identity Data or Security Questions

2 Verify Security Questions

And an alternate to giving the users a hash of something:

3 Send a Token Over a Side-Channel: "After step 2, lock out the user's account immediately. Then email or SMS the user a randomly-generated code having 8 or more characters... It is also a good idea to have the random code which your system generates to only have a limited validity period, say no more than 20 minutes or so... Of course, by all means, once a user's password has been reset, the randomly-generated token should no longer be valid..."

  • Allow me to add here that you can email the user the original token, but store a hash of it in the database using exactly the same protections you use for normal passwords, i.e PBKDF2/BCrypt/SCrypt, and storing only the resultant hash in the database. Then when the user uses the password reset email, if it's still within the very short time window, take whatever they give you, and use your password_verify() function to compare it to the reset token hash.

    4 Allow user to change password

Thus, your reset tokens are protected by:

  • Only being issued upon a validated request
  • Only being valid for a few minutes
    • i.e. hopefully too short a time for someone who's stealing your database backups to be able to use them!
  • Optionally being protected from rogue database access by your password hashing mechanism, just like any other password.

Your reset tokens are obviously not protected from an attacker with access to the user's email account, or who can change the listed email account, while the token is active.

Password reset via security questions as a whole is obviously not protected from an attacker who knows or can compromise the security answers and who has access to (or who can change) the user's listed email account.

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@relentless is correct. If the attacked gains access to the database isn't it true that he/she would be able to reset the passwords regardless of whether they had the keys? You're also assuming they've either gained access to the user's e-mail account or guessed the hash entirely. Another thing to consider, you don't necessarily have to store the hashes in the database. Consider this: let's say the hash is created by combining the user's e-mail with a key you've previously determined. When the reset page loads simply rehash the e-mail and key and see if it matches the hash in the query string.

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No. I just finished beating a developer because he did this. It's all fine and dandy to re-hash the emails of 10 users, but it's a real problem when you get to 300,000+ users. Store the hash, or I will find you. – Sammitch Mar 24 '14 at 23:58
    
@Sammitch It's probably OK to simply generate a one time key for the link in the email. Then only store a hash over the email address, creation time - which should be stored alongside - and the one time key. Upon discovery of the DB, the attacker has at least to alter the run code to unlock the accounts. A hash over a small amount of data is probably OK, especially if you do use a PBKDF for the passwords already. – Maarten Bodewes Mar 25 '14 at 0:17

Why don't you pass $thehash as a session variable, then check it to the function your directed to 'if it is set?', if it is, then execute, after then delete the session variable.

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How do I securely store hashes?

...

So what is a good way solve this? How do I securely store hashes?

This is the "Unattended Key Storage" problem, and its a problem without a solution. See Peter Gutmann Engineering Security.

John Steven of OWASP provides one of the better write ups related to password hashing and storage. He takes you through the various threats and explains why things are done a certain way. See

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There are multiple posts on the Internet regarding this issue, but here's how I see it.

(Do correct me if I'm wrong in what follows...)

A hacker can only do permanent damage if your actual DB and login credentials get known/compromised, where the data can be changed. Otherwise, the data remains safe even by changing the email address in the URL. Just as long as you don't give a potential hacker a back door to change the Email address; that's gold in its own right.

If passwords are properly stored using a one-way irreversible hashing method, then they are just that; irreversible and chances are rather great that they cannot be put back together. If a user's password has been compromised, then that will be a red flag for you to re-think the way you're using your DB.

At best, even if a user's password gets changed, give the user a method to change it again, then set a column to track how many times it has been changed. If it keeps changing too often, then again that will be another red flag. I have used a similar method to what you're using now and nothing got changed in the DB even when changing the Email address in the URL; everything must match.

Plus, even if someone did change a user's password, depending on what type of permissions or access you've given your users, what's the hacker going to do, change the password again?

The URL should contain the Email associated with the account, the hashed key stored in the DB and then retrieved, and will only work if a hacker has gotten hold of the user's Email account credentials and has gotten access to what should be a unique link.

I don't know which hashing method you're presently using, but there are a few that many suggest using.

Other links:


Footnotes:

Quoting owlstead if I may: (which I do agree with)

"The best methods are PBKDF's such as PBKDF2, bcrypt and scrypt. crypt should not be used if possible, password_hash() is an implementation of crypt and bcrypt and not a separate algorithm. Users passwords can always be compromised if they choose a bad password. One way cryptographic hashes or PBKDF's cannot be reversed, but they can be brute forced (e.g. using a dictionary attack)"

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I said correct me if I'm wrong, I didn't say downvote and keep your mouth shut. Explanation perhaps? – Fred -ii- Mar 25 '14 at 0:21
    
The best methods are PBKDF's such as PBKDF2, bcrypt and scrypt. crypt should not be used if possible, password_hash() is an implementation of crypt and bcrypt and not a separate algorithm. Users passwords can always be compromised if they choose a bad password. One way cryptographic hashes or PBKDF's cannot be reversed, but they can be brute forced (e.g. using a dictionary attack). – Maarten Bodewes Mar 25 '14 at 0:22
    
I never said that they were the best; I stated that many suggest that along with a lot of higher rep guys here on SO. @owlstead – Fred -ii- Mar 25 '14 at 0:23
    
"Users passwords can always be compromised if they choose a bad password." @owlstead Did you read all of it or did you merely glance at it in 30 seconds? – Fred -ii- Mar 25 '14 at 0:24
    
Yes, I did. I'm a terribly fast reader. – Maarten Bodewes Mar 25 '14 at 0:24

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